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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk 
Thread started 07 Jan 2016 (Thursday) 11:44
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Macro Lens Comparison

 
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Dalantech
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Mar 15, 2016 02:51 |  #46

John Koerner wrote in post #17935739 (external link)
Why don't we just agree to disagree.
Jack

I walked away from this one several days ago. It's a pointless discussion because you and I have completely different frames of reference and experience levels.


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davholla
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Mar 15, 2016 16:15 |  #47

John Koerner wrote in post #17935730 (external link)
My mistake. I should have said, "Show me a quality image" ...

That is needless rude. Actually I misread you that was with a flash but not a macro rail.




  
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davholla
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Mar 15, 2016 16:18 |  #48

John Koerner wrote in post #17935739 (external link)
Why don't we just agree to disagree.

I consider you to be a "backyard shooter," not a wildlife photographer.

Based on reviewing your photos, I think you take photos of baited bees, posed mantids, and maybe whatever lands in your garden.

Nothing wrong with shooting whatever it is you want to shoot, but don't misrepresent, okay?

In order to understand my article, you have to actually realize what I am talking about: an optimal, all-around macro lens, for wildlife excursions (not posed/staged shots in your backyard).

Jack

Is an animal in your garden not wildlife? What is wildlife? Is it a park? BTW if you ever go to somewhere in the US where people sometimes have bears in their garden, don't be afraid of them. By definition they are NOT wildlife and therefore NOT dangerous.




  
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Dalantech
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Mar 15, 2016 23:14 |  #49

davholla wrote in post #17936403 (external link)
Is an animal in your garden not wildlife? What is wildlife? Is it a park? BTW if you ever go to somewhere in the US where people sometimes have bears in their garden, don't be afraid of them. By definition they are NOT wildlife and therefore NOT dangerous.

You're wasting your time my friend -the only way he can look better than anyone is to put them down.


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John ­ Koerner
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Mar 19, 2016 13:17 |  #50
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Archibald wrote in post #17935775 (external link)
Hope you don't mind, but it's Voigtlander, no h, or even more correct, Voigtländer.

Don't mind at all, thanks.




  
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John ­ Koerner
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Mar 19, 2016 13:21 |  #51
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Dalantech wrote in post #17935870 (external link)
I walked away from this one several days ago.

Limped away, more like :p


Dalantech wrote in post #17935870 (external link)
It's a pointless discussion because you and I have completely different frames of reference and experience levels.

It is pointless because we have different comprehension levels.

And I agree, we do have different experience levels as well: you shooting staged, flash-assisted, non-nature shots in your garden, and I shooting non-staged, natural light photos, out in nature.

Jack




  
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John ­ Koerner
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Mar 19, 2016 13:31 |  #52
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davholla wrote in post #17936403 (external link)
Is an animal in your garden not wildlife? What is wildlife? Is it a park? BTW if you ever go to somewhere in the US where people sometimes have bears in their garden, don't be afraid of them. By definition they are NOT wildlife and therefore NOT dangerous.

This is actually a very good and very interesting question.

I would say an authentic wildlife shot = a shot of an animal, in its original, nature-created habitat, in the actual, un-manipulated light of the moment, totally un-influenced by man (i.e., you happened upon, and captured an image of, a wild animal, where it belongs, as it truly was found, in-situ).

A bear in your garden, if you live in the foothills, is a bear in your garden ... not in its natural habitat.

You going to the bear, in its nature-created habitat (and capturing a photo) = a wildlife photograph.

You walking out in your garden (taking a photo of a bear that got through your fence) = you taking a photo of a bear in your garden.

The trouble Dalantech can't seem to reconcile is that 99.99% of everything he has ever done = taking photos of arthropods either flatly staged, or drawn to his man-made, non-natural garden. (There is nothing wrong with this, of course, but it has nothing to do with wildlife photography.)

The entire point of the original article was a macro lens choice for wildlife (not staged, nor garden) macro photography. The point was to describe a macro lens with the most strengths to deal with the widest variety of potential circumstances ... with features to deal with each ... while sporting the highest image-quality ... and with the least limitations. And I believe the selection was spot-on.

If a person is looking for extreme, flash-assisted, staged macro-photography ... then this has nothing to do with the subject of the original article ... and so I wouldn't recommend the Sigma 180mm for that purpose.

I thought this was clearly explained (and, actually, it was clearly explained); however, many people don't actually read an article ... they "skim and comment" reflexively.

Jack




  
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CyberDyneSystems
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Mar 19, 2016 13:49 |  #53

Reviewer-ers?
Critique-erers?

Anyway, I found it a very good article, with a wealth of information.

On a side note, I've been looking at a possible USED SIGMA 180mm f/3.5 for some time, as an ultimate bargain long Macro. Of course this is an ENTIRELY different beast from the lens in question here, and yet it still has a number of the same advantages, and used it's 1/4 the price. Now, i reach for my old EF 100mm macro so rarely, I know I could not justify the price of this beauty of a lens.


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John ­ Koerner
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Mar 19, 2016 13:56 |  #54
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CyberDyneSystems wrote in post #17940844 (external link)
Reviewer-ers?
Critique-erers?

Anyway, I found it a very good article, with a wealth of information.

On a side note, I've been looking at a possible USED SIGMA 180mm f/3.5 for some time, as an ultimate bargain long Macro. Of course this is an ENTIRELY different beast from the lens in question here, and yet it still has a number of the same advantages, and used it's 1/4 the price. Now, i reach for my old EF 100mm macro so rarely, I know I could not justify the price of this beauty of a lens.

I guess the saying, "No one ever built a statue of a critic," applies :-D

I am glad you liked the article, and I actually (and originally) wasn't trying to "criticize" anything ... just give a list of "pluses" and "minuses" of each of the more common macro lenses for wildlife.

The elder Sigma 180 f/3.5 has many of the same advantages, true, but (while good) it does not have the same image quality as the Sigma 180 f/2.8, nor all of the benefits (OS, etc).

Cheers.




  
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Dalantech
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Mar 19, 2016 16:16 |  #55

John Koerner wrote in post #17940824 (external link)
The trouble Dalantech can't seem to reconcile is that 99.99% of everything he has ever done = taking photos of arthropods either flatly staged, or drawn to his man-made, non-natural garden. (There is nothing wrong with this, of course, but it has nothing to do with wildlife photography.)

Jack

After having been published on National Geographic's web site three times (How to Take Macro Picutes (external link)), published in their Young Explorer magazine, and after just receiving my ninth Daily Deviation from Deviant Art what exactly am I doing wrong?

The only reason you know where, or how, I take my images is because I tell you and everyone else who reads my posts.


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John ­ Koerner
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Mar 19, 2016 16:49 |  #56
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Dalantech wrote in post #17941013 (external link)
After having been published on National Geographic's web site three times (How to Take Macro Picutes (external link)), published in their Young Explorer magazine, and after just receiving my ninth Daily Deviation from Deviant Art what exactly am I doing wrong?

Thank you for your autobiography.

I never said you were doing anything "wrong" (in your photography).

I said you severely lack comprehension in your reading (again, please re-read my directly saying "there's nothing wrong" with studio shots in my previous post, let alone all the points you missed in my article).


Dalantech wrote in post #17941013 (external link)
The only reason you know where, or how, I take my images is because I tell you and everyone else who reads my posts.

Actually, Ray Charles could see that 99.99% of your photos are staged shots, taken with artificial light, in your backyard ;)

Jack

Edit: For the slow, I am not saying there is anything "wrong" with staged, studio shots in your backyard ... just please don't confuse this with wildlife photography in nature :idea:




  
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