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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk 
Thread started 20 Feb 2016 (Saturday) 01:49
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Focus Stacking Inspiration

 
Dalantech
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Post edited over 2 years ago by Dalantech. (4 edits in all)
     
Feb 20, 2016 01:49 |  #1

For those of you who like to get all the dents and cracks here's some inspiration for you.

Yousef Al Alhabshi (external link) recently made the cover in the Arabic version of National Geographic magazine. I've been following his work on Deviant Art for quite some time and what wins me over about his images is the light and the composition. The detail is just icing on an already tasty cake, so to speak.

I like the photos taken by Andrea Hallgass (external link) because they too are well lit and composed. He shoots both in the field and in the studio, and has separate rigs for both.

Most of you probably know John Hallmen (external link) but just in case I'll add him here as well. I really like his use of natural light because it's not dead even. Our brains are wired to process out of focus areas and shadows to determine the dimensions of an object, and with everything in focus and evenly lit it's easy for an image to look flat. Even though John gets a lot of depth in his images they don't look flat due to his use of light and shadow. He even worked out a way to deal with motion in post (external link) that might help some of you with uncooperative subjects.


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EKOEPP
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Feb 20, 2016 08:32 |  #2

Thanks! THAT IS inspiring


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medd63
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Post edited over 2 years ago by medd63.
     
Feb 20, 2016 08:49 |  #3

Awesome images.

I don't understand how to focus stack a LIVE animal. :(


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EKOEPP
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Feb 20, 2016 09:18 |  #4

medd63 wrote in post #17905556 (external link)
Awesome images.

I don't understand how to focus stack a LIVE animal. :(


Yeah, I think most of these were destroyed for the pics.

I know some insects are very stationary like my ghost mantis so its possible. Im going to give it a shot

this is awesome, but its more of a dead insect posing sport....


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racketman
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Feb 20, 2016 10:30 as a reply to  @ medd63's post |  #5

Mostly he shoots subjects early in the morning when they haven't 'woken up' so there's no movement other than any wind and he normally clamps the plant to the tripod. There's a few guys producing similar work and if there's a theme it's dew covered insects.
This Romanian photographer, Christian Arghius is another good example


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medd63
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Feb 20, 2016 12:09 |  #6

Thanks for the answers and the link :)


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Dalantech
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Feb 21, 2016 01:38 |  #7

racketman wrote in post #17905641 (external link)
Mostly he shoots subjects early in the morning when they haven't 'woken up' so there's no movement other than any wind and he normally clamps the plant to the tripod. There's a few guys producing similar work and if there's a theme it's dew covered insects.
This Romanian photographer, Christian Arghius is another good example


https://www.flickr.com​/photos/crisarg/ (external link)

Pretty sure Yousef Al Alhabshi is photographing dead insects, but I don't think that he's mentioned his technique (unless he did it in Arabic). Andreas Hallgas and John Hallmen shoot a lot out in the field, but pretty sure that Andreas shoots a mix of live and dead subjects. I like Christian Arghius's work as well Toby -good natural light photography.


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davholla
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Post edited over 2 years ago by davholla.
     
Feb 22, 2016 10:35 |  #8

I have these focus rails,
http://www.amazon.co.u​k …tore=photo#wasT​hisHelpful (external link)

Are they all I need for that level of control, because a lot of these setups seems to have a lot of extra controls (as opposed to just tripod and focus rails)?




  
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Swiftlet
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Post edited over 2 years ago by Swiftlet. (2 edits in all)
     
Feb 22, 2016 13:23 |  #9

There's no picture of the rail but judging by the price it's the common one which has a very coarse adjustment, so you have to eyeball the millimeter scale. For stacking at 2-3x you need less than a mm, or much less than a mm. The next rails "up" for field use are Velbon Mag slider and Manfrotto 454. Neither is great but you can get say 5x or so - depending on the lens.
For movements around a mm, you can teach yourself to do it by hand, it's not too hard if you have some support, even a twig in the non-camera hand.



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davholla
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Feb 22, 2016 13:49 as a reply to  @ Swiftlet's post |  #10

Sorry this is the one I meant
http://www.amazon.co.u​k …ocusing+Rail+Sl​ider+Truck (external link)




  
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Swiftlet
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Post edited over 2 years ago by Swiftlet.
     
Feb 22, 2016 15:41 |  #11

That's it - or similar. Copies of copies? Here I've got half of one of those as a lateral adjust.
One turn of the large knob is 29mm. You'd have to read the scale directly to use it for stacking.

One turn of the 50mm micrometer is 0.5mm. It'll do stacks to about 10x with a ho-hum lens or 2x with a good one. Bought used, $120, probably 10 years ago.
You count turns or use the mike's 10┬Ám ticks.


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davholla
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Feb 23, 2016 04:24 as a reply to  @ Swiftlet's post |  #12

Thanks when I have some time, I will have to try. Two questions I would like to ask all these people who get up early to get half asleep insects are
1) Are you married or living with someone?
2) If the answer is yes, how do you stop complaining, because my wife would call me crazy, if I did that.




  
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Dalantech
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Feb 23, 2016 05:18 |  #13

davholla wrote in post #17909311 (external link)
Thanks when I have some time, I will have to try. Two questions I would like to ask all these people who get up early to get half asleep insects are
1) Are you married or living with someone?
2) If the answer is yes, how do you stop complaining, because my wife would call me crazy, if I did that.

Married, and I always wake up before she does anyway :)


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Focus Stacking Inspiration
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