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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos The Business of Photography 
Thread started 11 May 2016 (Wednesday) 20:18
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Thomas Heaton on Selling Prints

 
Tedder
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May 11, 2016 20:18 |  #1

HERE (external link) is a YouTube video from British landscape photographer Thomas Heaton about selling prints.

Although I don't sell my photographic masterpieces, I think the video is interesting and might be useful to others. Heaton presents his "formula" for pricing (in pounds) starting at about 8:15.


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Dan ­ Marchant
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May 12, 2016 04:17 |  #2

As he says in the video, there is no process to pricing prints. I had a real problem pricing my prints. In the end I have just taken the approach of experimenting. I priced them the same a other photographers in my area but then tested the market by increasing prices. I did this on the simple basis that my images are stylistically completely different from those of my competitors so there really is no competition. If someone likes their work they won't buy mine just because it is the same/cheaper and vice-versa.

I think one of the key factors is the creation of perceived value. Art is valuable because it's scarce or because someone says it is good or because people like it. However the perception of value can also be important. Selling a limited edition doesn't make an image better, yet it often commands a higher price. A fine art print doesn't cost much more than a standard print to produce but again can command a higher price.

I resisted requests to put my images on canvas wraps as I didn't think they looked as good as the matt prints on fine art paper. I only offer two sizes in one finish. I don't sell a lot of prints but when I do the A3 size (not limited edition) sells for the same price as he was selling his A1 prints.


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proimages
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May 12, 2016 14:54 |  #3

Hi All, love to find out the end result of the endevor..seems like he severely limited his sales window and better be a marketing machine!!

I have been working on a business model I've seen around.

limited edition run 100 pcs
The first 25 are lowest price and after level of 25 prints sold the price goes up.
The last 10 prints are the most expensive. After 100 then the fine art print is locked, but still open to unsigned posters /calendars etc...

This should maximize the value of the image and reward the early collectors.
Love to hear more ideas!!
Plus if anyone hears about Thomas Heaton's results please post!
cheers
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Tom ­ Reichner
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Post edited over 3 years ago by Tom Reichner. (2 edits in all)
     
May 12, 2016 15:03 |  #4

.

More often than not, pricing prints is a moot point.

Why? Because in so many cases, the designer specs out a prints of given dimensions for various spaces throughout the building, and they have a strict budget with which to fill these spaces. It's the designer's job to pick the art and determine which prints go in which spaces. It is also the designer's job to stay on budget, because they simply do not have any approval to exceed budget. If my print price does not fall in line with their budget then the designer goes elsewhere and fills those needs with someone else's photos, or with lithographs (prints of paintings), or whatever.

So it's the same as selling to magazines - the client tells me the price that they pay for a given usage. I then either accept their terms, or I decline, in which case they use someone else's work. I don't set the prices; the clients do.

.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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Dan ­ Marchant
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May 14, 2016 23:21 |  #5

proimages wrote in post #18004828 (external link)
I have been working on a business model I've seen around.

limited edition run 100 pcs
The first 25 are lowest price and after level of 25 prints sold the price goes up.
The last 10 prints are the most expensive. After 100 then the fine art print is locked, but still open to unsigned posters /calendars etc...

This is the same technique that Peter Lik uses to inflate the perceived value of his work. It's not a very well thought of method. This is a quote from a new York Time article....

Art consultant David Hulme, who in 2012 warned against collecting Lik "because Peter Lik's photographs have no secondary market presence or value," routinely fields calls from Lik owners who are hoping for a profitable resale. He told the Times that he worries that the galleries' tiered pricing structure is "misleading" customers, understandably causing them to assume that the outside market will reflect the ever-rising prices charged by the artist.

You made 100 prints. You sell 50 but so what. There are still 100, they are no more scarce than they were when you owned all 100.


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Hogloff
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May 15, 2016 21:54 |  #6
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Tom Reichner wrote in post #18004837 (external link)
.

More often than not, pricing prints is a moot point.

Why? Because in so many cases, the designer specs out a prints of given dimensions for various spaces throughout the building, and they have a strict budget with which to fill these spaces. It's the designer's job to pick the art and determine which prints go in which spaces. It is also the designer's job to stay on budget, because they simply do not have any approval to exceed budget. If my print price does not fall in line with their budget then the designer goes elsewhere and fills those needs with someone else's photos, or with lithographs (prints of paintings), or whatever.

So it's the same as selling to magazines - the client tells me the price that they pay for a given usage. I then either accept their terms, or I decline, in which case they use someone else's work. I don't set the prices; the clients do.

.

This is exactly right. I sell most of my prints through a house decorator and they have a certain budget for a project for art and sometimes that means 5 prints, sometimes 15 prints...but quite often the budget does not change by much. We have a good relationship that keeps me busy and happy.




  
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Thomas Heaton on Selling Prints
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