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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Sports Talk 
Thread started 18 Oct 2016 (Tuesday) 23:56
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Football Setup

 
john ­ crossley
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Oct 23, 2016 14:14 |  #16

Hannya wrote in post #18164515 (external link)
I have to admit I find American Football more about a bunch of people standing around doing nothing much, followed by short bursts of confused bodies running this way and that.

In 2010 a report was published which concluded that there was on average 11 minutes of action in a game of American Football.


Football is a very simple game. Twenty-two players chase a ball and Germany always win.

  
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rdalrt
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Post edited over 2 years ago by rdalrt.
     
Oct 23, 2016 17:59 |  #17

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18163850 (external link)
.

When I shot H.S. football for the local paper, I shot anywhere from 800 to 4,000 frames per game. It behooves you to shoot as many frames as possible, so as to increase the number of "keepers" that you will ultimately capture.

.

4000 frames for a high school game? Holy moly. I have to agree with John Crossley on this one. There is only so much peak action worth capturing each play.

I shoot a lot of football. High school all the way through pro (CFL up here). Rarely do I exceed 400 frames for a high school game and usually right about 1000 for a CFL game. I usually keep/file about 8%.

Maybe if I was shooting the Superbowl or Grey Cup and was just passing cards off to a runner to take to an editor I would crank out 4000 frames. But when I have to shoot, select, edit, caption and upload on my own, I prefer to be a bit more selective on the action I shoot.


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Oct 24, 2016 00:02 |  #18

rdalrt wrote in post #18164810 (external link)
4000 frames for a high school game? Holy moly. I have to agree with John Crossley on this one. There is only so much peak action worth capturing each play.

I never mentioned anything about only capturing the action on the field.

There are a lot of players on each team - not sure exactly how many on a high school roster, it's been several years. But my goal would be to get each and every player with as many facial expressions as possible. During the game, one never knows just what the main story will be at the game's end.

Here are just a few possible scenarios:

1: Perhaps a coach gets mad over a call and uses profanity toward an official from the sideline......doesn't seem to be a big deal at the time - nobody even really notices it happen - but later that week we learn that the league is going to discipline the coach for his abusive language.

2: Perhaps a LT misses a block and a RB berates him in an interview after the game.

3: Perhaps a player is distracted during the huddle, looking over at his friends in the stands for just a brief moment......and then runs the wrong route on the next play.

There are literally thousands of different things that could happen during the game that someone wants to run an article on. The writers will want a game photo that best illustrates the incident that they are writing the article about.

Wouldn't it be great if:

Scenario #1 happens and I have a whole bunch of images of the coach on the sideline, yelling? I also have photos of that particular official and that coach shaking hands and looking friendly toward each other before the game. I also have photos of that official with unpleasant expressions on his face. And stilll more - I have photos of that official and that coach looking upset at one another in a heated exchange along the sidelines - from a prior play. The writer / editor can pick the frame which they feel best fits the story and the page it will be printed on. Maybe they use one of these on a front page banner and another on the page along with the article. Perhaps in the paper's online edition they use 3 or 4 of the photos. I don't know what they'll want to use, but they can't use it if I didn't capture it.

Scenario #2 happens and I have a whole bunch of images of that particular running back with unpleasant expressions on his face? Maybe I even get lucky and happen to have an image of him with an unpleasant look on his face when he is looking toward that left tackle, say, as they break the huddle on a subsequent play. And then I also have a whole bunch of photos of the left tackle, with a lot of different unpleasant expressions on his face? And then also wouldn't it be cool if I also had some photos of those two players interacting positively in pre-game warmups? And maybe I even capture an image with both players in the frame, facing each other, with unpleasant looks that they are giving one another.

Scenario #3 happens, and I happen to have, somewhere within that 4,000 frames, an image that shows the players huddled up, with that particular player glancing somewhere outside the huddle, when all of his teammates are focused inward as they discuss the play they are about to run?

You see, during the game, in the heat of the action, there is no way to know all that will transpire throughout the course of the game, nor what will be said or done afterwards when interviews are conducted and discipline is doled out - that is humanly impossible. So, with so many things happening on the field and on the sidelines, during the plays, between the plays, after the game, before the game . . . . .you have no idea which thing will end up being significant later on. So you sure as heck better capture everything that you possibly can, because that will increase the likelihood that you will have a pertinent photo for any article, no matter what the writers want to write about after the game has ended.

At any given time, there are 22 players on the field, a few dozen more on the sidelines, a few coaches on each sideline, and few officials. At any moment - any second - one of them might do something that is newsworthy. But so often, at the time these things happen, nobody knows that they will become newsworthy at some point in the near future. Don't you want to increase your chances of capturing the newsworthy happenings? That, my friend, is the reason for thousands of images.

.


"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
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john ­ crossley
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Oct 24, 2016 05:24 |  #19

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18165042 (external link)
I never mentioned anything about only capturing the action on the field.

There are a lot of players on each team - not sure exactly how many on a high school roster, it's been several years. But my goal would be to get each and every player with as many facial expressions as possible. During the game, one never knows just what the main story will be at the game's end.

Here are just a few possible scenarios:

1: Perhaps a coach gets mad over a call and uses profanity toward an official from the sideline......doesn't seem to be a big deal at the time - nobody even really notices it happen - but later that week we learn that the league is going to discipline the coach for his abusive language.

2: Perhaps a LT misses a block and a RB berates him in an interview after the game.

3: Perhaps a player is distracted during the huddle, looking over at his friends in the stands for just a brief moment......and then runs the wrong route on the next play.

There are literally thousands of different things that could happen during the game that someone wants to run an article on. The writers will want a game photo that best illustrates the incident that they are writing the article about.

Wouldn't it be great if:

Scenario #1 happens and I have a whole bunch of images of the coach on the sideline, yelling? I also have photos of that particular official and that coach shaking hands and looking friendly toward each other before the game. I also have photos of that official with unpleasant expressions on his face. And stilll more - I have photos of that official and that coach looking upset at one another in a heated exchange along the sidelines - from a prior play. The writer / editor can pick the frame which they feel best fits the story and the page it will be printed on. Maybe they use one of these on a front page banner and another on the page along with the article. Perhaps in the paper's online edition they use 3 or 4 of the photos. I don't know what they'll want to use, but they can't use it if I didn't capture it.

Scenario #2 happens and I have a whole bunch of images of that particular running back with unpleasant expressions on his face? Maybe I even get lucky and happen to have an image of him with an unpleasant look on his face when he is looking toward that left tackle, say, as they break the huddle on a subsequent play. And then I also have a whole bunch of photos of the left tackle, with a lot of different unpleasant expressions on his face? And then also wouldn't it be cool if I also had some photos of those two players interacting positively in pre-game warmups? And maybe I even capture an image with both players in the frame, facing each other, with unpleasant looks that they are giving one another.

Scenario #3 happens, and I happen to have, somewhere within that 4,000 frames, an image that shows the players huddled up, with that particular player glancing somewhere outside the huddle, when all of his teammates are focused inward as they discuss the play they are about to run?

You see, during the game, in the heat of the action, there is no way to know all that will transpire throughout the course of the game, nor what will be said or done afterwards when interviews are conducted and discipline is doled out - that is humanly impossible. So, with so many things happening on the field and on the sidelines, during the plays, between the plays, after the game, before the game . . . . .you have no idea which thing will end up being significant later on. So you sure as heck better capture everything that you possibly can, because that will increase the likelihood that you will have a pertinent photo for any article, no matter what the writers want to write about after the game has ended.

At any given time, there are 22 players on the field, a few dozen more on the sidelines, a few coaches on each sideline, and few officials. At any moment - any second - one of them might do something that is newsworthy. But so often, at the time these things happen, nobody knows that they will become newsworthy at some point in the near future. Don't you want to increase your chances of capturing the newsworthy happenings? That, my friend, is the reason for thousands of images.

.

The flip side of that is; shooting 4000 frames doesn't guarantee that you will get the money shot.


Football is a very simple game. Twenty-two players chase a ball and Germany always win.

  
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Hannya
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Oct 24, 2016 15:11 |  #20

john crossley wrote in post #18164638 (external link)
In 2010 a report was published which concluded that there was on average 11 minutes of action in a game of American Football.

LOL that seems to sum it up! Why I prefer soccer over cricket too!


“Your first 10,000 photographs are your worst.” ― Henri Cartier-Bresson

Sports Pics (external link)

  
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mikepj
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Post edited over 2 years ago by mikepj.
     
Oct 24, 2016 23:51 |  #21

I don't believe any one work style is best here. Some want to capture as much as they can and find the gems later. Others try their best to minimize the number of shots they take so they have less to process later. I think it depends not only on the photographer, but also the game they are recording. Like rdalrt was saying, the same photographer photographing a HS game would most likely take a lot fewer photos than if they were shooting the SuperBowl.

The last game I photographed, I took just over 1000 photos. That was when I was only shooting with my 5D2, at 4 fps. With how much faster my 7D2 is, I was just concerned about running out of memory cards. Might not be an issue, but better to be safe than sorry.

Thanks again to everyone here sharing their advice. Really looking forward to the game this Saturday.


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Football Setup
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