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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 05 May 2017 (Friday) 05:51
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Average beautydish size? 16" big enough ?

 
CanonYouCan
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May 05, 2017 05:51 |  #1

I have a 16" beautydish with honeycomb, isn't this size small for 1 model (outside shoots) ?
http://www.alb.co.kr …tail.aspx?pCode​=59&idx=48 (external link)

As it's less portable for outside shoots i'm thinking of buying something like this (but have to take care when the wind blows as my tripod isn't that sturdy either) :)
http://www.benl.ebay.b​e …geName=STRK%3AM​EBIDX%3AIT (external link)
But I don't know if a honeycomb would fit on this.

This one is 28", so reasonably bigger.
Anyone has an idea what the average beautydish size is for 1 model ?


Sony A7 III | Metabones V | Canon 16-35 F4 L | Sigma 85 1.4 Art | 70-200 2.8L II
Lighting : Godox AD600B TTL + Godox V860II-S + X1T-S
Modifiers: 60cm Collapsible Silver Beautydish + grid | Godox 120cm Octagon softbox + grid + Speedlite Flash bender
Tripod: Vanguard Alta 253CT carbon

  
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nixland
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May 05, 2017 07:58 |  #2

For my taste, I like the 22 inch BD the most. Not too small, not too large to give wrapped beauty dish type of light on model's face. But everyone has their own preference :)




  
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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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May 05, 2017 08:04 |  #3

CanonYouCan wrote in post #18346826 (external link)
Anyone has an idea what the average beautydish size is for 1 model ?

how long is a string?

meaning: there is no answer to that question that would provide any real meaning. An "average" sized beauty dish might work for an "average" portrait. Or it might not.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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ImageMaker...
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May 05, 2017 08:24 |  #4

Not sure of the question. The answer is 42 though.

Both will work. Size won't matter. It's how you use it. Find that "sweet" spot.


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F2Bthere
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May 05, 2017 23:05 |  #5

I seem to recall this has been discussed before... A little searching might give you more information.

As you can probably gather from the comments above, the answer boils down to what kind of lighting you hope to achieve.

The "general wisdom" for beauty dishes is that they work best one to two times the diameter distance from your subject. By this rule of thumb, your 16" dish would be optimal at a distance from 16-32" from your subject. As the size gets larger, not only do you gain the greater spread from the larger diameter, you also gain a greater spread from the greater distance. So a 22" dish can be used from 22" to 44" away. Get to a 27" dish and you are backing up between 27" and 54"!

What I just wrote is all theoretical. In the real world, there are a few other factors. Beauty dishes are made differently, so there can be significant differences between designs. More importantly than that, what your taste is in how you want the light to look and what mine is are potentially very different. Not everyone uses the above rule of thumb.

What most of us do is try the modifier, look at the pictures, make some changes, look at those pictures and, over time, decide what look we want in a situation and pick the tool, position and angle accordingly.

In short, I think everyone is trying to be helpful, but it is a hard question to answer well.


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F2Bthere
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May 05, 2017 23:21 |  #6

A couple other thoughts which might help.

First thing I would do is try using what you have. Start with 16" from your subject. A very patient person is a great gift--treat them well. Or, get a mannequin (a very good investment). Start with the light aimed down at your subject at an angle from in front of them and above their nose or just slightly to the right or left of just above their nose. Lower the light enough to get a nice catchlight in their eyes and combine this with the angle so you get a little shadow under the nose but not too much (over the lip is too much). Play with the height and angle till you get results you like. If you can use the modeling light in a dark room, this might be easier. Now do the same at 24" and 32"

Look at the pictures you like best from each distance. Which do you prefer? How do you like the images? Look especially at the quality of the shadows, how dark they are compared to the lighter parts and how quickly they go from light to dark.

If you like them, 16" is perfect. If they look too contrasty (too much dark shadow), it might be worth considering a larger dish.

But this is a studio test. But, you say, I wanted to use it outside! Right you are. And if it looks too contrasty in the studio, it might be just fine outdoors, because ambient provides a lot of fill. But the reason to start with a studio test is that it controls variables and gives you a clear sense of how to use the tool ;).

Once you get outside, it will have less contrast, and perhaps that is perfect. Want more contrast, back it up. Want less or need more space? Now is the time to consider a larger BD :).

So even though it is on the small side for a BD, that might be perfect for outdoors. Or not. Only your eyes can tell you.


C&C always welcomed...
On my images, of course, and on my words as well--as long as it's constructive :).
https://www.instagram.​com/storyinpictures_co​m/ (external link)

  
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ImageMaker...
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May 06, 2017 00:54 |  #7

Also. Try that dish 6, 8, 10 feet away. Observe the subject from those distances too


Nikons, Rolleiflexes, Elinchroms, Billinghams

  
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artsf
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May 06, 2017 14:57 |  #8

I use 18" but 22" is probably better for portraits. After trying many different setups, I found that beauty dish with a sock works great as hair light in my low celings studio (Inuse it with a flash).




  
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RicoTudor
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May 06, 2017 19:31 |  #9

If OP is outside, 16" might be more practical for transport. I think of the grid as an interior-shooting option to control stray light (a white BD generates a ton). I shoot inside, so a 22" gives more flexibility for placement distance while keeping the light softer.


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ImageMaker...
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Post edited over 3 years ago by ImageMaker....
     
May 06, 2017 22:26 |  #10

RicoTudor wrote in post #18348024 (external link)
If OP is outside, 16" might be more practical for transport. I think of the grid as an interior-shooting option to control stray light (a white BD generates a ton). I shoot inside, so a 22" gives more flexibility for placement distance while keeping the light softer.

I've got a 17", and 27" BD. Both have been used indoors and outdoors on location. No issues transporting. Just get or make a protective case for them.

...and don't put your golf clubs on top.


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dmward
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May 07, 2017 08:04 |  #11

F2Bthere wrote in post #18347544 (external link)
The "general wisdom" for beauty dishes is that they work best one to two times the diameter distance from your subject. .

This is based on the desire to have the light source, although focused, to be larger than the subject head so that the light wraps the subject while also having a rapid transition from highlight to shadow. The deflection disk is there to make sure all the light emitted is indirect which minimizes a center hotspot.

Considering what the photographers doing Hollywood beauty headshots wanted as a final result, the beauty dish design was specific. My personal preference is to have a dish with a minimum diameter twice the width of a normal human head. i.e. 24 inches. Then keep the dish within 24-28 inches of the subject.


David | Sharing my Insights, Knowledge & Experience (external link) | dmwfotos website (external link)

  
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Average beautydish size? 16" big enough ?
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