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FORUMS General Gear Talk Computers 
Thread started 23 Sep 2017 (Saturday) 21:37
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Li-ion battery charging and battery life

 
rrblint
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Sep 23, 2017 21:37 |  #1

Okay all you Li-ion battery experts, I have a question for you.

For a number of reasons I am using Internet-sharing from my phone via Wi-Fi as my main home Internet connection. My phone is a four year old Windows 8.1 phone with non-replaceable Li-ion battery. The battery performance is not what it once was but still fairly decent. It will share Internet via Wi-Fi with my computer and I-pad for about 6 hours without a charge going from 100% to 20% in this period of time.

My question is this: I have a choice of using the battery in the fashion described above and then recharging after each 6 hours of use, or simply leave the charger plugged into the phone at all times when I'm using Internet-sharing and only using the battery when I use the phone as an actual mobile device. Which of these methods would be better for preserving as much battery life as I can?


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John ­ from ­ PA
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Sep 24, 2017 07:11 |  #2

rrblint wrote in post #18459017 (external link)
Okay all you Li-ion battery experts, I have a question for you.

For a number of reasons I am using Internet-sharing from my phone via Wi-Fi as my main home Internet connection. My phone is a four year old Windows 8.1 phone with non-replaceable Li-ion battery. The battery performance is not what it once was but still fairly decent. It will share Internet via Wi-Fi with my computer and I-pad for about 6 hours without a charge going from 100% to 20% in this period of time.

My question is this: I have a choice of using the battery in the fashion described above and then recharging after each 6 hours of use, or simply leave the charger plugged into the phone at all times when I'm using Internet-sharing and only using the battery when I use the phone as an actual mobile device. Which of these methods would be better for preserving as much battery life as I can?

See above.

In addition most people would probably suggest you not let the battery drain below about 35% to 40% for best life.




  
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rrblint
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Sep 24, 2017 07:44 |  #3

John from PA wrote in post #18459217 (external link)
See above.

In addition most people would probably suggest you not let the battery drain below about 35% to 40% for best life.

Hi John long time , no talk. Good to hear from you.

So you are saying that leaving the charger plugged in while using Internet-sharing is better for the battery?


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John ­ from ­ PA
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Sep 24, 2017 08:17 |  #4

rrblint wrote in post #18459236 (external link)
So you are saying that leaving the charger plugged in while using Internet-sharing is better for the battery?

Yes, but I think some clarification may be necessary. It generally is not a good idea to leave a fully charged Lithium Ion battery on a charger for extended periods because Li-ion generally doesn't like an overcharge state. When fully charged, the charge current must be cut off and the charger that came with your smartphone likely handles that situation well. Li-ion batteries also don't like a trickle charge, again the intended charger that came with the phone handles that situation very well. The issues you often hear about, some of which are myths, can be caused by general purpose, one size fits all 3rd party chargers.




  
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Sep 24, 2017 09:05 |  #5

Thanks for the clarification. Yes, I'm pretty sure that my original charger takes care of those contingencies.


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tim
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Sep 24, 2017 19:13 |  #6

Agree that you should leave plugged in while using the internet. To extend battery life you try to keep LiIon batteries in the 40% to 90% range - but I wouldn't obsess about it.

I tend to charge my Huawei P9 which has a non-replaceable battery up to around 90 - 95%, but I just leave it on charge in the evening until I remember. Charging of my phone drops to a very slow rate from about 85%, so Huawei is doing something at least semi-smart to optimize battery life.

Battery University (external link) is a useful reference site.


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rrblint
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Sep 24, 2017 21:16 |  #7

tim wrote in post #18459624 (external link)
Agree that you should leave plugged in while using the internet. To extend battery life you try to keep LiIon batteries in the 40% to 90% range - but I wouldn't obsess about it.

I tend to charge my Huawei P9 which has a non-replaceable battery up to around 90 - 95%, but I just leave it on charge in the evening until I remember. Charging of my phone drops to a very slow rate from about 85%, so Huawei is doing something at least semi-smart to optimize battery life.

Battery University (external link) is a useful reference site.

Yes, that sounds like a good plan. Thanks for the link, looks like good reading for me.


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Li-ion battery charging and battery life
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