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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Kids & Family Talk 
Thread started 28 Sep 2017 (Thursday) 16:29
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Teaching young children photography

 
Monkey ­ moss
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Sep 28, 2017 16:29 |  #1

I'm after some thoughts on how to go about teaching my children photography. Mine are 2 (boy) and 4 (girl). They both like looking at pictures on the phone, and pictures from a day out on the computer etc.

I bought my daughter a Minnie Mouse camera last year and to be frank its a bit pants. Awkward to use, screen is pants etc (no I'm not obsessive about IQ - for them anyway!). It just doesn't seem very intuitive and it holds my daughters attention for about 5 minutes - and thats not the norm for her, she will spend ages on some stuff.

I'm not delusional in terms of them being great photographers now, I just want to give them whatever knowledge I can, as soon as I think they will understand it, and they can decide for themselves what they want to do. But like it or not, photography will be a big part of their lives regardless, so I'd like them to be pretty good at it.

So my first question is what sort of camera would you recommend for the 4 year old, (i'd likely get it for her 5th b'day)? A rugged compact, one of these larger ones with games as well, are there any really basic compacts? Any other suggestions? I'm not so bothered about the boy at the mo, i think he is a bit too young, and we've tried to keep them both away from 'screens' for as long as possible!

Second question is, what have you taught your children, and at what age. I do talk my basic photography thoughts through with my oldest occasionally, but I think it just goes in one ear and out the other. Maybe she is just too young and I should wait. On the other hand they obviously learn quicker when they are younger, and so i want to teach her stuff now.

Would love to hear thoughts and experiences.

Thanks
Jon


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Bassat
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Sep 28, 2017 17:09 |  #2

My own children had no interest in photography (They are 35 & 37, now). My youngest grandson is 7. I bought him an XSi/18-55 this summer. He loves taking it to family functions. On his own, he is learning when he needs to use the pop-up flash, and has figured out several other things. Like shooting a bird on the other side of the yard at 55mm doesn't make a nice photo, and keeping the camera level makes a better photo. Point is, he is discovering it on his own.

About two weeks after he got it, I had him for the day and we spent about 15 minutes with a fast 50. He got bored in about 15 seconds. I am back to letting him discover things on his own. No advice from me, unless he asks. Even then, I keep it to a minimum. I don't want to ruin it for him. Public schools kill enough curiosity.

Don't teach your kids photography. Help them discover it. Be there to answer questions, and always give the minimum information THEY NEED to get questions answered.


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WaterBoy2090
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Post edited 10 months ago by WaterBoy2090. (2 edits in all)
     
Sep 28, 2017 17:39 |  #3

I bought my daughter a waterproof & drop proof Nikon Coolpix camera W100 when she was 5. She loves the interactive creative photo menus and carries her camera everywhere with her on our outings.

This camera also has an app which allows automatic download of photos to an iPad or laptop too, something that makes 'monitoring' our sneaky little photographer easier!

This is her second camera, her older Hello Kitty digital camera is now the proud property of her 3 year old brother.

The other camera both my kids love using is a small Fuji Instax Polaroid camera.

Printing out their favourite photos at the end of outing is also a highlight for them, and putting their photos on display, either in their own frames or photos albums helps too.


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Spacemunkie
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Oct 01, 2017 18:12 |  #4

Kids don't need to be taught photography. Just give them a camera (any camera!) and let them go nuts.

My boy had a huge old floppy disk Mavica that he took heaps of photos on and loved. I gave him an iPod Touch after that and he's still using it. Simple to use, good screen for viewing pics/video and it does other useful stuff for him. Old (or cheap) phones also excellent for kids.

Just about to let him loose on an old EOS M at 8yo. I fully expect it to be broken within a year :D


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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Oct 01, 2017 19:10 |  #5

Agree with above. Hand them a camera and let them take pics. Start simple and build as they gain interest.

When they take a pic that exhibits some of the standard "rules" of composition, discuss why it works, print it and put it on the fridge.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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Monkey ­ moss
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Oct 02, 2017 15:42 |  #6

Thanks for the replies, appreciate it.

Great advice, and I agree with the comments. I don't intend to lay it on thick, just want to give them the opportunity really. Those Nikon Coolpix cameras look like a reasonable balance, fairly rugged, reasonably priced, chunky buttons, and reasonable screen to hopefully keep interest, thanks for the suggestion. Think i'll get her one of those for her 5th birthday and see if she is interested or not.

Printing and rewarding is a good shout as well.

Would be interesting to hear experiences from others as well.


Jon :cool::oops::D:cry::confused::(:lol:
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Spacemunkie
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Oct 02, 2017 23:00 |  #7

A follow up thought...

The thing I've enjoyed most about giving my boy a camera from a very early age hasn't been seeing him develop as a 'photographer' or even developing any sort of technical skills. It's that I've been able to see a little of the world as he sees it - not just his physical perspective, but also the things, people and places he encounters that interest him, the objects and belongings that mean something to him etc. :)


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spamster
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Nov 19, 2017 01:22 |  #8

I always feel that nowadays .... I mean kids in general want to have what adults have. Especially when it comes to something the kids actively see the parents using on a frequent basis. For example, they see you cooking. Sure a fake kitchen would be okay but a miniature kitchen with real metal pots and pans is definitely has more feel to it than colorful Plastic things. That's how I feel, especially with my kid. My son ignores a lot of the colorful play stuff or loses interest quick. I have an old SD800IS that I plan to teach him with.

Conclusion: might be better to get a point and shoot with manual modes or a cheap old dslr.


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spamster
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Nov 19, 2017 01:23 as a reply to  @ Spacemunkie's post |  #9

This is awesome. +1.


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Teaching young children photography
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