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Thread started 11 Nov 2017 (Saturday) 10:39
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Camera Options...? Canon, Sony, Panasonic

 
flyfishing4life
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Nov 11, 2017 10:39 |  #1

I am looking into getting a camera for lower end professional videos for outdoor activities such as hunting, fishing, kayaking, etc. I have a Canon 5D MK2 that I use to shoot stills as well as a assortment of L glass.

What camera would you all recommend in the canon line up?

Or should I completely try and switch to a new system?

Thanks!




  
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MalVeauX
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Nov 11, 2017 10:51 |  #2

The 5D2 does video and opened the doors for professional video work that you've perhaps even seen on the big screen.

You're already set.

You just need a video rig setup (gimbal stabilizer, focus system, microphone, etc) that incorporates the 5D2 if you want more professional data acquisition (the results are going to be highly based on your processing and comp flow afterwards).

Very best,


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flyfishing4life
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Nov 11, 2017 10:57 |  #3

It definitely has a good capability. I have played with it some but was looking for something that was a little more tailored toward video.

Maneuvering in and out of video mode on the 5dmk2 can be tricky.

I will be self filming most of this stuff as well.




  
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MalVeauX
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Nov 11, 2017 11:08 |  #4

To assist in the idea that your camera is already well off for what you want to do. You need video accessories, not a new camera.

https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=IMhPg2XVs_4 (external link)
https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=8eq0WpwTsjE (external link)
https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=BymshZ4behY (external link)
https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=X1dpLc5arl4 (external link)
https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=PnL4Z0ebcBc (external link)

Seriously watch these just to get ideas.

Very best,


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Scott ­ Spellman
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Post edited 7 months ago by Scott Spellman. (2 edits in all)
     
Nov 11, 2017 13:12 |  #5

flyfishing4life wrote in post #18493971 (external link)
I am looking into getting a camera for lower end professional videos for outdoor activities such as hunting, fishing, kayaking, etc. I have a Canon 5D MK2 that I use to shoot stills as well as a assortment of L glass.

What camera would you all recommend in the canon line up?

Or should I completely try and switch to a new system?

Thanks!

Based of your description of self filming outdoor activities, I would recommend a different camera system. The 5D2 is great and I have one but it lacks a front monitor, remote viewing and control, and is all manual focus. It offers a very high quality image, but it is very hard to operate alone.

For you I would recommend a DJI Osmo+ (which I also have)
https://www.bhphotovid​eo.com …a.html/?c3ch=CS​E&c3nid=98 (external link)

It offers some huge benefits for daylight video work including complete remote control from your smartphone, great optical quality and zoom, and can still use shotgun or lavalier mics with a mic jack. Since you can pan and zoom from your phone, you can operate the entire camera on a tripod without having to go back to touch it every time and it will completely transform they way you shoot videos. It has built in stabilization for completely smooth hand held use. Plus the entire system weighs less than 1lb, so its much more portable. With a simple clamp, you can easily attach to a boat, kayak, car, etc. Best of all-its $600.

The negative with this type of camera is that the image quality on a big screen is not quite as good or film-like as a larger sensor camera with big glass. Given that most people will only see your videos on the Internet, this is less of a concern. Batteries last about 45 minutes, so get extras.

If you like to talk over your videos, just add a lavalier mic such as the Rode Lav:
https://www.bhphotovid​eo.com …reless_filmmake​r_kit.html (external link)

I'll be happy to try an help with any other questions you have.




  
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SailingAway
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Nov 11, 2017 18:38 |  #6

There are lots of camcorders out there, with several advantages over dSLRs. Including the excellent and increasingly affordable Canon C-series, such a great look and also compatibility with your existing lenses.

However, they are a lot bigger than an OSMO or your 5Dm2 - that may be a problem for what you want to shoot, or, maybe not.

Lots of people shooting the activities you're talking about are using different kinds of action cameras. Small, easy to rig, water resistant and inexpensive can be a *very* good thing.

You really need to decide if you're starting with a video camera, your 5d, or an action camera or two. Or maybe an OSMO, more of a hybrid. And that all depends on what kinds of shots you want to get. If you want to rig to a kayak that's an action cam. If you want to interview people that's a videocam or a dSLR with added external sound. If you want follow shots on walking in the woods an OSMO or your dSLR on a gimbal can be great...

Another way to think about it is what kind of camera you want to learn on. Maybe not the ultimate cam, but a place to start. Frankly, your 5Dm2 is a great learning camera. You'll get past the immediate obstacles of video mode.


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

  
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flyfishing4life
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Nov 11, 2017 19:19 |  #7

I think I’m going to try and learn with the 5Dmk2.

I have some action cameras and a drone but I am really looking for a camera that can be used on solo hunts and fishing trips to make quick 2-5 minute videos recapping the experience. Having the ability to zoom/slide/fade will help on these types of shots.

I appreciate all the information so far everyone. Any more tips/helpful info is appreacited!




  
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Scott ­ Spellman
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Nov 13, 2017 09:28 as a reply to  @ flyfishing4life's post |  #8

The challenge with the 5D2 is that it is manual focus only and you can't see what is being recorded unless you are behind the camera. You will have to put a tall object at the position of your head, go back to the camera and focus on it, go record your clip, and then go back to the camera to confirm it was in focus. Your zooms and slides will all have to be done at the camera manually with a slider. An Osmo operated from your phone will give you focus, zoom, and pan right from wherever you are and you can see exactly what is being recorded.




  
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MatrixBlackRock
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Nov 20, 2017 17:41 |  #9

flyfishing4life wrote in post #18494274 (external link)
I think I’m going to try and learn with the 5Dmk2.

I have some action cameras and a drone but I am really looking for a camera that can be used on solo hunts and fishing trips to make quick 2-5 minute videos recapping the experience. Having the ability to zoom/slide/fade will help on these types of shots.

I appreciate all the information so far everyone. Any more tips/helpful info is appreacited!

Yea stick with your 5D and manual focus.

Professional camcorders are all manual focus, the last thing in the world you need is for an auto focus system to decide to refocus of something other than your subject.

That stated, for excellent video, you need excellent audio, video is eye candy the audio makes up 90% of the content.

Any ideas on how much you are willing to spend on audio gear?

Wayne




  
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ShutterKlick
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Nov 20, 2017 19:26 |  #10

I do both video and photo. I got my 5300 for doing improved video over my aged Sony camcorder.

The video from my 5300 is simply stunning. However, to be honest.. I dont think they make a digital CAMERA that performs as well as a CAMCORDER, when it comes to focus.

My aged Sony camcorder STILL shoots AWESOME video, not near as good as my 5300... but one thing is EXCELS at is FOCUS!

The videos I do with my 5300 are prefocused because AF basically is lacking. I know there has been a LOT of improvements in modern digital cameras, both DSLR and mirrorless... but unless someone can show me a digital camera that focuses as well as a camcorder/video camera, I plan on upgrading to a video camera for ACTION VIDEO, where AF and tracking must be spot on perfect.

Mind you, this is from my limited experience.. I have a shoe string budget thus I cannot buy cameras until I find what works for my every application, so if I am missing out on a recent advancement I stand to be corrected.

Im looking forward to the follow ups..

HTH,
Andrew


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SailingAway
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Nov 20, 2017 20:38 as a reply to  @ ShutterKlick's post |  #11

I’m a real fan of Canon’s latest generations of Autofocus, they call it DPAF (Dual-Pixel AF). Some sort of phase difference detection using pixels that are used only for AF not for recording? I don’t know.

That in combination with face detection and touch-screen focus targeting is just plain awesome. I speak from decades of experience when working pros considered AF a toy. It’s really come of age.

I’ve not kept up with exactly which dSLRs and camcorders have the latest version (of course they keep on improving it), but the 80D for stills/video and the C100 Mk II as a cinematography camcorder that does dual duty into videography. The both have the latest Canon DPAF goodness.

But, action video can be a bit of a crapshoot, when things move fast cameras *and* camcorders can get confused. Um, so can I ;-)a


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

  
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MatrixBlackRock
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Nov 21, 2017 07:54 |  #12

ShutterKlick wrote in post #18500741 (external link)
The videos I do with my 5300 are prefocused because AF basically is lacking. Im looking forward to the follow ups..

HTH,
Andrew

That's the way you want it, if a camera has auto focus, when shooting video the AF should be turned off. While AF is handy for stills, simply because your a looking through the view finder and you know the AF point is where you wish it to be, with video it can shift from where you want it to be and refocus on something that is not the subject of the video, blowing the clip and forcing a retake, which is not always possible.

Wayne




  
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MatrixBlackRock
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Nov 21, 2017 07:55 |  #13

SailingAway wrote in post #18500776 (external link)
But, action video can be a bit of a crapshoot, when things move fast cameras *and* camcorders can get confused. Um, so can I ;-)a

That's why camcorders have a viewfinder and a focusing ring, which is where ones fingers should be when shooting action or moving targets.

Wayne




  
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SailingAway
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Post edited 7 months ago by SailingAway.
     
Nov 21, 2017 10:32 |  #14

MatrixBlackRock wrote in post #18500994 (external link)
That's the way you want it, if a camera has auto focus, when shooting video the AF should be turned off. While AF is handy for stills, simply because your a looking through the view finder and you know the AF point is where you wish it to be, with video it can shift from where you want it to be and refocus on something that is not the subject of the video, blowing the clip and forcing a retake, which is not always possible.

Wayne

Have you used recent versions of Canon’s DPAF for video? I find it quite useful. So do others. Many, many others!

MatrixBlackRock wrote in post #18500693 (external link)
...Professional camcorders are all manual focus...

Your information is a little dated. For example, the Canon C300 Mk. II, everyone’s darling documentary camera of the moment is seeing a lot of broadcast time. DPAF! It’s got recent generation AF, but no touch screen. C200 has all the latest, including touch-screen targeting.

MatrixBlackRock wrote in post #18500693 (external link)
...the last thing in the world you need is for an auto focus system to decide to refocus of something other than your subject...

That’s true. Equally embarassing is when *you* blow focus.

Cinematographers tend to use manual focus because they *are* in control of the set, and can do retakes as needed when they blow focus. For them, focus is another compositional tool, and frequently want to use focus creatively.

Videographers have it tougher because they usually *aren’t* in control of the set. The latest AF technology makes their shots easier.

Tracking and having control of a visible focus target has made a big difference. Good control of AF targeting is a technique to be learned.

BTW, other camcorder manufacturers are also adopting DPAF...

But you’re welcome to any technique that works for you. Focus for HD on tiny LCDs is challenging, and not all shoots can accomodate a larger monitor that makes MF easier.


From the upper left corner of the U.S.
Photos, Video & Pano r us.
College and workshop instructor in video and audio.
70D, Sigma 8mm, Tokina f2.8 11-16, Canon EF-S f2.8 17-55, Sigma f2.8 50-150 EX OS, Tamron 150-600VC. Gigapan Epic Pro, Nodal Ninja 5 & R10.

  
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BigAl007
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Nov 21, 2017 13:02 |  #15

ShutterKlick wrote in post #18500741 (external link)
I do both video and photo. I got my 5300 for doing improved video over my aged Sony camcorder.

The video from my 5300 is simply stunning. However, to be honest.. I dont think they make a digital CAMERA that performs as well as a CAMCORDER, when it comes to focus.

My aged Sony camcorder STILL shoots AWESOME video, not near as good as my 5300... but one thing is EXCELS at is FOCUS!

The videos I do with my 5300 are prefocused because AF basically is lacking. I know there has been a LOT of improvements in modern digital cameras, both DSLR and mirrorless... but unless someone can show me a digital camera that focuses as well as a camcorder/video camera, I plan on upgrading to a video camera for ACTION VIDEO, where AF and tracking must be spot on perfect.

Mind you, this is from my limited experience.. I have a shoe string budget thus I cannot buy cameras until I find what works for my every application, so if I am missing out on a recent advancement I stand to be corrected.

Im looking forward to the follow ups..

HTH,
Andrew


One of the biggest advantages that camcorders have when it comes to AF is sensor size. Most video cameras, outside of the real pro systems, have sensors that are not much larger than the sensor in a cheap point and shoot, and so have very similar DoF characteristics. Given such wide DoF, coupled with the fact that it's generally quite hard to pixel peep at 25 or 30 fps means that the cameras AF system can actually get away with quite a bit of inexactitude.

Alan


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