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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre People Talk 
Thread started 23 Nov 2017 (Thursday) 00:36
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Reducing shine on faces

 
woodywork
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Nov 23, 2017 00:36 |  #1

I'm having a number of problems with shiny hot spots on peoples faces when photographing school formals/proms. The area that I live in can be quite warm and humid and it's becoming very time consuming fixing it up in post. Does anybody have any recommendations in regards to lighting to either prevent or reduce this. please. Currently I'm using umbrellas either side of me at about 45 degrees to the subject but have thought about using a pair of softboxes and feathering them, any thoughts ?




  
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Nogo
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Post edited 7 months ago by Nogo. (2 edits in all)
     
Nov 23, 2017 00:46 |  #2

Don't forget the other side of the problem. You can carry a pack of blotting paper especially for the guys. For the women, suggest they touch up the powder right before you take their photos. Fixing the source of the problem can be easier than trying to fix the lighting or fixing it in post sometimes.


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woodywork
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Nov 23, 2017 01:26 |  #3

Thanks Nogo, the problem is time. There is normally 80-120 kids with partners and parents and an hour to capture it all. Not ideal.




  
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Nogo
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Post edited 7 months ago by Nogo.
     
Nov 23, 2017 08:35 |  #4

30 seconds per student to set up, take 3 or 4 photographs and get them to get out of the way for the next couple? That sounds like an absolute nightmare. Without a crew helping out, the clients should not expect much.

I won't advise you on lighting, others are more qualified. Personally I would try two large diffused modifiers at 45 like you are doing with the umbrellas just make sure to get them up high. But, I don't know if it would help your problem at all so I will let someone with more experience help you there.

I would still add an assistant to blot the guys. Even if it was just one of the crowd who was willing to jump in and help it would be worth doing.


Philip
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PhotosGuy
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Nov 23, 2017 09:42 |  #5

woodywork wrote in post #18502473 (external link)
Thanks Nogo, the problem is time. There is normally 80-120 kids with partners and parents and an hour to capture it all. Not ideal.

Phillip gave you the best solution. Don't ignore it. Find someone, maybe two or three 'someones', to work with the parents & students that are waiting so that you don't have to do it.
Maybe put a lighted mirror near the end of the line. Maybe add a fan to move the air.
Blotting paper is OK. DO NOT supply powder & applicators because of cross contamination.

120 kids in an hour.

The concept, "Chinese Fire Drill" (external link) comes to mind! ; )


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jra
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Dec 17, 2017 11:58 |  #6

I would agree with Nogo...having an assistant helping to prep the "next ups" can help tremendously and will generally speed up the work flow. As far as reducing shine, the only sure fire way I've discovered is to either get rid of the sweat and oil before a photo or spend time in PP afterwards. IME, lighting styles can help somewhat but usually will not eliminate the problem.




  
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MalVeauX
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Dec 17, 2017 12:16 |  #7

Heya,

How big is your modifier and far is it away from the subject(s)?

Spectral highlights are made worse with oil or wet skin. So having something for them to pat their nose/cheeks/forehead will help.

Otherwise, I'm going to assume the size of your umbrellas are small relative to their distance to subject. If the modifier size is larger, or at least larger relative to the subject (closer), the spectral highlights will be reduced or eliminated. A small 33" umbrella that is 12 feet away for example will not be soft. But a 60" at 3 feet will be pretty soft. And a 7' will be very soft up close (and you can stand in front of it even!).

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BryanIS
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Post edited 5 months ago by BryanIS.
     
Feb 04, 2018 19:32 |  #8

If preventing it is absolutely not a possibility the fastest way ive found in post is create a darken layer. Use a soft 100% opacity brush at a low flow (5-10%) sample the skin color near the shine and paint over it. Reduce the opacity to suit your taste.




  
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DesolateMirror
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Feb 05, 2018 09:44 |  #9

The cheapest and easiest is probably to try a polarizing lens filter. Google images "polarizer portrait". You can see that it reduces the shine a lot. Practice before the event so you have it setup right.

Some examples:
https://www.popphoto.c​om …-Factor.jpg?itok=ptchMX​dd (external link)
https://1.img-dpreview.com …3860d499d83f432​691111e294 (external link)




  
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woodywork
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Feb 06, 2018 06:19 |  #10

Thanks for all of the suggestions, I'm intrigued by the polarizing filter though, DesolateMirror. Looking forward to give it a try.




  
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Gungnir
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Mar 06, 2018 04:01 as a reply to  @ woodywork's post |  #11

Polariser tends to make people look lifeless in portraits. Don't just lose the highlights you want to, even set for minimal effect you lose the subtle highlights which make a person look alive.


Steve
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Reducing shine on faces
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