Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS General Gear Talk Tripods, Monopods & Other Camera Support 
Thread started 04 Jan 2018 (Thursday) 00:15
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Good reason to use a carbon fibre tripod

 
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
33,567 posts
Gallery: 81 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 3759
Joined May 2002
Location: Northern Indiana
Post edited 7 months ago by TeamSpeed. (21 edits in all)
     
Jan 05, 2018 10:19 |  #16

Vaporize means the human turns to vapor and dissipate. Even the article doesn't support this. Sorry you don't like the counter to your claim, but people simply aren't vaporizing from lightning strikes.

Burned (3rd degree)? Yes.
Major shock to nervous system and all other electrical pathways in the body, stopping the heart and other organs? Yes.
Some disintegration of tissue and organs along the path of conductivity? Yes.

There are multiple distinct causes as to why people die from lightning.

Person's body vaporizing and dissipating in the air? No.

- There are 5 different methods of being struck by lightning, a direct strike is very bad, the others are more "splash damage".
- 10% of people struck by lightning actually die.
- On the flip side, sometimes those struck by lighting develop super talents, albeit rare.
- It would take 3 gigajoules to vaporize a human. A lightning bolt would have to be 65000 times stronger than they are now to do this, or said differently, it would take 11-12 minutes of the entire planet's current rate of electrical discharge to occur at one point to vaporize a human.

Very interesting stuff.

Maybe I am reading something different in your original post though, and if so, I apologize. It sounded initially to me that you were stating people are dying because they are vaporized.


Past Equipment | My Personal Gallery (external link) My Business Gallery (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
gjl711
According to the lazy TF, My flatulence rates
Avatar
54,341 posts
Likes: 1749
Joined Aug 2006
Location: Deep in the heart of Texas
     
Jan 05, 2018 10:20 |  #17

Pippan wrote in post #18533367 (external link)
Is it as conductive as aluminium?

No, but when we are talking about lightning, just about anything is going to conduct. Trees make good lightning conductors which is why it's a bad idea to stand under one in a storm.


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
I used to hate math but then I realised decimals have a point.
.
::Flickr:: (external link)
::Gear::

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
SkipD
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
20,475 posts
Likes: 154
Joined Dec 2002
Location: Southeastern WI, USA
     
Jan 05, 2018 17:06 |  #18

saea501 wrote in post #18533984 (external link)
What do you think that kind of burn is? When body parts are destroyed to the point where it's hard to tell what you're looking at. According to the Smithsonian, vaporizing is certainly part of it.

'The electricity crackling over the surface of the human body singes clothing, vaporizes sweat and moisture into scalding steam, and renders metal objects like belt buckles, keys, and jewelry so hot that they burn the skin. Occasionally, all that steam even blows victims’ shoes and socks off."
Read more: https://www.smithsonia​nmag.com …2937/#c86Imxj5B​RH1kyuW.99 (external link)

Ever seen body parts that have seen thousands of volts of electricity? So, yes, vaporizing is a pretty accurate description of what things look like afterward. Sorry if I used a word you didn't care for.

Gimme a break.

Bob is absolutely correct.


Skip Douglas
A few cameras and over 50 years behind them .....
..... but still learning all the time.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Cham_001
Senior Member
Avatar
875 posts
Likes: 57
Joined Feb 2009
Location: based between Ruse, Bulgaria & Recife-Brazil
     
Feb 06, 2018 08:54 |  #19

In overcast conditions, I can actually 'smell' the static in the air. When this happens lightning strikes within 10mins.
So, in that short time frame I do run for cover - so far this strategy has worked.
There are other smells that I detect, that are an aside to this Thread.

I read with interest and sadness this posted article:

http://www.news.com.au …cfb3c6e4688ddd0​921f516637 (external link)

and I am genuinely thankful to the Almighty that I am blessed with this keen sense of smell to protect me.


"... with a clear perspective - the confusion is clearer ..."
Body: Canon 5D-IV
Lenses: 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM, 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
Flashguns: 580ex II x 4, MT24 macro flash
Accessories: Pkt Wiz TT5 x 4, AC3, MiniTT1, Sekonic L-758DR
Studio Lights: <... pending ...>

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Pippan
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,005 posts
Gallery: 36 photos
Likes: 924
Joined Oct 2015
Location: Darwin, Straya
     
Feb 06, 2018 09:02 as a reply to  @ Cham_001's post |  #20

I can't say I've smelt it but I've been in a place on top of my truck on top of a hill watching a storm roll in and felt my (then long) hair stand on end. I got down and out of there as quick as I could. We get a lot of lightning in the Northern Territory and in a situation like that and the one at Kings Canyon it pays to be very aware of lightning's potential. I'd much rather be carrying a short carbon fibre tripod than a long metal one.


— Please feel free to offer your thoughts on how I might improve my images —

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
40,351 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2076
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
Post edited 6 months ago by Wilt.
     
Feb 06, 2018 09:04 |  #21

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18533101 (external link)
1) If there is lightning in the area, don't walk around with anything strapped to your back taller than you, or in fact don't have anything conductive around you if you can help it. This is the reason softball and baseball teams (for children anyways) don't have practice or games with lightning in the area. (Aluminum bats aren't great things to be holding out in front of you with a storm in the area)

2) If you are going to have a tripod during hiking, find the most compact one you can so that it is small and unobtrusive. Unfortunately, if you want one that isn't conductive, you are basically restricted to yucky alternatives.

It is an urban myth that lightning always strikes the tallest object, as visibly demonstrated in these photos

http://stormhighway.co​m …s_tallest_objec​t_myth.php (external link)

BTW that same article has photos that disprove a variety of other urban myths about lightning strikes. I found this site just now. Eye opening.


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Cham_001
Senior Member
Avatar
875 posts
Likes: 57
Joined Feb 2009
Location: based between Ruse, Bulgaria & Recife-Brazil
     
Feb 06, 2018 09:22 as a reply to  @ Wilt's post |  #22

Wilt,

great find.
just read through it.
Basically, is pure 'pot-luck'!


"... with a clear perspective - the confusion is clearer ..."
Body: Canon 5D-IV
Lenses: 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM, 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
Flashguns: 580ex II x 4, MT24 macro flash
Accessories: Pkt Wiz TT5 x 4, AC3, MiniTT1, Sekonic L-758DR
Studio Lights: <... pending ...>

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Cham_001
Senior Member
Avatar
875 posts
Likes: 57
Joined Feb 2009
Location: based between Ruse, Bulgaria & Recife-Brazil
     
Feb 06, 2018 09:23 |  #23

Pippan wrote in post #18557604 (external link)
I can't say I've smelt it but I've been in a place on top of my truck on top of a hill watching a storm roll in and felt my (then long) hair stand on end. I got down and out of there as quick as I could. We get a lot of lightning in the Northern Territory and in a situation like that and the one at Kings Canyon it pays to be very aware of lightning's potential. I'd much rather be carrying a short carbon fibre tripod than a long metal one.

---
is it fair to say that your 'neck-hair' is your 'radar' alerting you to an imminent strike?
does this happen to you often when lightning storms are due?


"... with a clear perspective - the confusion is clearer ..."
Body: Canon 5D-IV
Lenses: 70-200mm f/2.8L IS II USM, 24-70mm f/2.8L II USM
Flashguns: 580ex II x 4, MT24 macro flash
Accessories: Pkt Wiz TT5 x 4, AC3, MiniTT1, Sekonic L-758DR
Studio Lights: <... pending ...>

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
40,351 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2076
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
     
Feb 06, 2018 09:54 |  #24

Cham_001 wrote in post #18557618 (external link)
Wilt,

great find.
just read through it.
Basically, is pure 'pot-luck'!

If your reference to 'pot-luck' is that it is purely chance on where the lightning actually strikes in reality, YES! And like your influence on the dishes to be served at a potluck are totally without inflluence, YES!


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
40,351 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2076
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
Post edited 6 months ago by Wilt.
     
Feb 06, 2018 09:56 as a reply to  @ Cham_001's post |  #25

Lots of charge in the air = static, and like static induced from plastic wrap that was rubbed on wool, the static lifts the hair on the skin on your arm. Eventually the accumulated static discharges somewhere as sheet lighting or bolts of lightnin.


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Pippan
THREAD ­ STARTER
Goldmember
Avatar
1,005 posts
Gallery: 36 photos
Likes: 924
Joined Oct 2015
Location: Darwin, Straya
     
Feb 06, 2018 18:17 |  #26

Wilt wrote in post #18557605 (external link)
It is an urban myth that lightning always strikes the tallest object, as visibly demonstrated in these photos

http://stormhighway.co​m …s_tallest_objec​t_myth.php (external link)

BTW that same article has photos that disprove a variety of other urban myths about lightning strikes. I found this site just now. Eye opening.

While it is true that lightning doesn't always strike the tallest object, there is plenty of evidence that it does so more frequently than not. A few photos from a random storm-chaser doesn't prove it's a complete myth. The man killed at Kings Canyon was exposed on a high, open, iron-rich plateau, and just a year earlier an American was killed by lightning while camped at the top of Mt Warning in northern NSW, on the small tip of the highest peak for many miles around (and the first place in mainland Australia to see the sunrise, which is why people camp there).

The north-west of Australia's Top End, including Darwin, is one of the most lightning-prone regions on earth (along with parts of South America, Florida and South Africa). Meteorologist Ian Shepherd, who manages the severe weather section at the Bureau of Meteorology in Darwin, says (external link), "If you are caught out in a thunderstorm in exposed areas it is advisable that you don't shelter under trees or under open structures like pergolas and suchlike, especially if they are isolated." Dr Shepherd said electricity from lightning can be attracted to tall objects and would quickly shoot down a tree. "The electricity goes down the tree and it can then jump across to your body because your body is full of water, so it is the preferred conducting channel ... It is suggested that if you are caught outside, and you can't get to a car or building, that you crouch down in a depression, you don't lay down, and if you crouch down you are a lower target", Mr Shepherd says.


— Please feel free to offer your thoughts on how I might improve my images —

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,082 views & 6 likes for this thread
Good reason to use a carbon fibre tripod
FORUMS General Gear Talk Tripods, Monopods & Other Camera Support 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is canoncranker
742 guests, 384 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.