Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 27 Jan 2018 (Saturday) 20:21
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Glacier National Park lens options

 
treebound
Senior Member
Avatar
547 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 13
Joined Apr 2011
Location: Wisconsin
     
Jan 27, 2018 20:21 |  #1

My wife and I are closer to planning a visit to Glacier National Park, probably this summer or 2019 at the latest. Will probably be staying close to roads and parking areas, possibly short hikes but we’re still in the early planning phase. Probably late Spring or late Summer to hopefully cut down on the crowds.

I’m still running my Canon 60D. Current lenses are the kit 18-135, Canon 55-250 (not the latest version), and a 50mm Canon lens. In the past I wanted the 100-400L, can’t afford the latest version. I’ve also considered one of the Sigma or Tamron 150-600mm lenses. For the wide end of things I’ve wanted a 10-22 Canon for a long time, and even though the 10-18 is less expensive I always go back to considering the 10-22 for some subjective reason. It has neen a couple of years since I’ve put much effort into lens research so I plan to refresh myself with current offerings because I’m sure things have changed.

Apart from the trip I do mostly family events and grandkid’s sports. I do like shooting some landscapes and wildlife and birds and such. Also city-scapes, waterfront scenes, and general wide ranging stuff and throwing in the occasional bicycle race.

Currently the 18-135 lives on the camera 95% of the time. And when I’m using the 55-250 it is rarely too long at the 55mm end and is often too short at the 250mm end.

Anyway, I’m very open to listening to opinions on what you would shop for, or perhaps more importantly what you would avoid. For now I’ll ballpark a $1,000 budget give or take a little.

Thank you in advance for any insight or suggestions. In the mean time I’ll go refresh myself with the current and older lens reviews.


=====
60D w/18-135 kit lens, 55-250mm, EF 50mm 1.8, 580EXII flash.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Capn ­ Jack
Goldmember
Avatar
1,642 posts
Gallery: 760 photos
Likes: 3920
Joined Mar 2010
Location: NE USA
     
Jan 28, 2018 06:28 |  #2

If you are shooting animals, the 250 will be a little short for you. For a one-time trip, I'd consider renting a long lens. My opinion was that 18 mm worked fine for me for landscapes.

The link shows pictures from my trip to GNP and you can see the focal lengths I used with a crop-sensor camera.
https://www.flickr.com …/albums/7215763​3669623820 (external link)

Also, within these forums, a search on "glacier" brings up a number of threads from people that visited GNP with camera and lens information.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
John ­ from ­ PA
Cream of the Crop
8,083 posts
Likes: 508
Joined May 2003
Location: Southeast Pennsylvania
     
Jan 28, 2018 06:42 |  #3

Capn Jack wrote in post #18550779 (external link)
If you are shooting animals, the 250 will be a little short for you. For a one-time trip, I'd consider renting a long lens.

^^^^^^^^

See https://www.lensrental​s.com/ (external link)

One thing to consider, if you leave the northeast corner of GNP, you are about 3 hours from Calgary and the Calgary Stampede runs from July 6th to the 15th. It is a fantastic event for a night or two. You can then leave Calgary, hit a few spots heading west (Canmore, Lake Louise, etc.) and then drive due south to Kalispell, the usual airport for travel to/from the area. The bad thing is that recent changes in U.S. law now require you to have a passport or equivalent for travel across the US Canada border when you travel by car. See https://www.tripsavvy.​com …-travel-documents-1481719 (external link) for the details.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
treebound
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
547 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 13
Joined Apr 2011
Location: Wisconsin
     
Jan 28, 2018 08:52 |  #4

Thanks for the input.

Looks like 18mm might be wide enough, and at times 500mm or 700mm might not be quite long enough but will still get the shot.

One of the very few remaining camera stores near me has lens rentals so I think I’ll compare their rates to the lenrentals.com option. I’m hoping that if they have one of the Sigmas that they will use their docking station to match it to my camera.

I’m slowly looking through the previous GNP threads.

Another thing I’ve been considering is picking up a more portable like the Nikon 7600 or a Canon SX series or some other brand with similar features.

Whatever I get will be for more than just this trip, so I’m shopping for a long time add to my available gear.


=====
60D w/18-135 kit lens, 55-250mm, EF 50mm 1.8, 580EXII flash.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
FarmerTed1971
fondling the 5D4
Avatar
5,837 posts
Gallery: 66 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 2904
Joined Sep 2013
Location: Portland, OR
     
Jan 28, 2018 09:24 |  #5

Yes, rent. You can get the 100-400 v2 and be very happy with it for a week. Save your money.


Getting better at this - Fuji Xt-2 - Fuji X-Pro2 - 18-55 - 23/35/50 f2 WR - 50-140 - flickr (external link) - www.scottaticephoto.co​m

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
treebound
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
547 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 13
Joined Apr 2011
Location: Wisconsin
     
Jan 28, 2018 13:24 |  #6

Looks like the local camera store’s rental rates are comparable to the LensRental’s rates, but the local store requires a full value deposit. I’ll check the other local store as well. I may wait for an outdoor family event and test rent something from lensrentals.


=====
60D w/18-135 kit lens, 55-250mm, EF 50mm 1.8, 580EXII flash.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
John ­ from ­ PA
Cream of the Crop
8,083 posts
Likes: 508
Joined May 2003
Location: Southeast Pennsylvania
     
Jan 28, 2018 15:09 |  #7

Look this over...https://improvephotogr​aphy.com …de-glacier-national-park/ (external link) and take note that at most of the destinations the photographer mentions the gear he used. Keep in mind he was using a full frame Nikon. The reason I bring this up is I personally (on two trips) found wildlife to be a bit sparse in July. I got pictures of a lot of mountain goats but that is about all. I carried a zoom that went out to 300mm but many of the goat shots were done with a 17-50 Sigma. Why? The goat wander down to the parking lots to lick up puddles where an occasional radiator has over flowed. The antifreeze tastes good although it can make them seriously ill if they consume too much.

My point is with the 55-250mm you might not need anything else! Max out the resolution, shoot RAW and do some cropping in post afterwards.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tom ­ Reichner
"I am a little creepy"
Avatar
12,154 posts
Gallery: 140 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 2923
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Omak, in north-central Washington state, USA
Post edited 6 months ago by Tom Reichner.
     
Jan 28, 2018 22:52 |  #8

John from PA wrote in post #18551097 (external link)
. . . the reason I bring this up is I personally (on two trips) found wildlife to be a bit sparse in July.

John from PA wrote in post #18550787 (external link)
One thing to consider, if you leave the northeast corner of GNP, you are about 3 hours from Calgary and the Calgary Stampede runs from July 6th to the 15th. It is a fantastic event for a night or two.

John,

You mention July twice, yet I cannot understand why, as the OP pretty much made it clear that July (midsummer) is not even being considered. . Did you not see what he wrote in the original post?

treebound wrote in post #18550516 (external link)
Probably late Spring or late Summer to hopefully cut down on the crowds.

.

To the OP:

If you really want to go in late spring, then you should be aware that the main road through the park could very well still be closed due to heavy snow on the roadway. . It would behoove you to check the status for the Going To The Sun road prior to finalizing your schedule.

This is from the park's website:

Glacier National Park wrote:
.
There is no set date for the road to open. Typically the road has been fully open in late June or early July.

Here are some PAST OPENING AND CLOSING DATES:


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.



.
I'm sorry, but at this moment I don't have anything to offer inasmuch as lens advice is concerned.

.

.

"Your" and "you're" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"They're", "their", and "there" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one.
"Fare" and "fair" are different words with completely different meanings - please use the correct one. The proper expression is "moot point", NOT "mute point".

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
John ­ from ­ PA
Cream of the Crop
8,083 posts
Likes: 508
Joined May 2003
Location: Southeast Pennsylvania
Post edited 6 months ago by John from PA.
     
Jan 29, 2018 02:01 |  #9

Tom Reichner wrote in post #18551428 (external link)
John, You mention July twice, yet I cannot understand why, as the OP pretty much made it clear that July (midsummer) is not even being considered. Did you not see what he wrote in the original post?

I'm well aware of what the OP stated as far as schedule. I was only trying to make the point that on my two trips, each about two weeks long, I saw very little wildlife, hence something like a lens that can go to 400mm might be overkill. The OP's 55-250mm might be more than adequate, especially on his cropped body 60D. Now if wildlife has their own schedule, and I've missed it because of going in July, then that is a different matter. In both instances of my travels to GNP I have combined it with the Calgary Stampede, this year Jul 6, 2018 to Jul 15, 2018.

I've also traveled extensively in Jackson Hole and Yellowstone, where in that same time frame, wildlife seems plentiful and a long lens would be desirable.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Snydremark
my very own Lightrules moment
18,249 posts
Gallery: 44 photos
Likes: 1337
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
     
Jan 29, 2018 02:30 |  #10

You will want the 100-400 or one of the 150-600s, for the animals and you'll definitely want something wider than 18mm; some of the views are just massively expansive. I would definitely consider renting those lenses for that trip and then evaluate any permanent spending later. It's a great park; unless you are driving all the way through, I'd highly recommend riding one of the red buses from the lodge to traverse the Going to the Sun road...it just isn't a pleasant drive and you can't dawdle along to appreciate the views on such a heavily traveled and narrow road.


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
treebound
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
547 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 13
Joined Apr 2011
Location: Wisconsin
     
Jan 29, 2018 10:12 |  #11

I do appreciate all the input, even the personal experiences at different times of the year. We’re still deciding between this year and next year, and after some discussion it is starting to look like we will drive there from Wisconsin in 2019.

Some bicycle touring reports talk about being able to bicycle the Going to the Sun road before it opens to car traffic, but my chance of convincing my wife to bicycle the road is slim to none. Especially if there is a chance of cycling into a grumpy Grizzly on the roadway.

On Sunday I was reading about the area and saw where they mentioned the busses and that sounds really good provided that I can get on the good side of the bus.

We are taking note of early season opening dates and late season early closing dates and I’m thinking late August might be good. But forest fires are the wildcard with that option.

We do have vacation plans for this summer sometime so I can still maybe rent a lens or two with a focus on looking for mountain goats and such along with some sunsets in the Washington Cascades. And delaying a visit to Glacier gives me more time to shop and rent and save.


=====
60D w/18-135 kit lens, 55-250mm, EF 50mm 1.8, 580EXII flash.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
John ­ from ­ PA
Cream of the Crop
8,083 posts
Likes: 508
Joined May 2003
Location: Southeast Pennsylvania
Post edited 6 months ago by John from PA.
     
Jan 29, 2018 17:32 |  #12

treebound wrote in post #18551653 (external link)
I do appreciate all the input, even the personal experiences at different times of the year. We’re still deciding between this year and next year, and after some discussion it is starting to look like we will drive there from Wisconsin in 2019.

Wow, that is a haul! 1500 miles from Milwaukee.

Depending on your route, try to work in a stop at Mount Rushmore. It is an awesome sight, phenomenally huge and only requires a hour or so for the visit. The "faces" are angled toward the southeast so getting there from mid-morning to early afternoon gets you a good shot without too many shadows. Rushmore also lends itself nicely to a nighttime shot. There are other points of interest in the area as well, the Badlands, Deadwood, Devil's Tower, etc.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Snydremark
my very own Lightrules moment
18,249 posts
Gallery: 44 photos
Likes: 1337
Joined Mar 2009
Location: Issaquah, WA USA
     
Jan 29, 2018 17:56 |  #13

Boy; that *is* a drive! How long are you planning to be in the park? I wouldn't worry too much about bears ON Going To The Sun, but I'd be absolutely terrified to be caught on that road with any traffic on a cycle. Having been a driver for 30+ years and a motorcyclist for ~8+, I've never been on a road I *don't* want to drive on that badly....blind turns, LONG drops, no guard rail and not enough lane (the mts are IN the lane at some points of the road) make the views breathtaking but the actual driving migraine inducing, IMO :p

I don't think bears are too much of a worry in that particular stretch of the park; more likely to encounter a Big Horn or Mt Goat right through there from our experience on the trip. Bears and moose were more of a worry in the northern side of the park. Whether you do the bus tour or not, the one you'll definitely want to drive yourself for is specifically to stop at the park at the summit and do the trail there. You will wind up closer to the sheep and goats than you ever thought (or likely want to ;) you would. Blasted Mt Goat sat down IN the trail and had to get booted by a Ranger :|


The buses have roll tops and will be open in nice weather; plus, the drivers do a fair amount of slowing and stopping along the way for you to get out and take in the views [we regret not doing the bus tour on our visit, which is not something either of us say lightly].


- Eric S.: My Birds/Wildlife (external link) (7D MkII/5D IV, Canon 10-22 f/3.5-4.5, Canon 24-105L f/4 IS, Canon 70-200L f/2.8 IS MkII, Canon 100-400L f/4.5-5.6 IS I/II)
"The easiest way to improve your photos is to adjust the loose nut between the shutter release and the ground."

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Capn ­ Jack
Goldmember
Avatar
1,642 posts
Gallery: 760 photos
Likes: 3920
Joined Mar 2010
Location: NE USA
     
Jan 29, 2018 19:14 |  #14

Also, consider a tripod to help stabilize the long lens. Or even a monopod will help. I have a walking stick with the screw that fits into the camera (1/4 inch by 20 thread)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
John ­ from ­ PA
Cream of the Crop
8,083 posts
Likes: 508
Joined May 2003
Location: Southeast Pennsylvania
     
Jan 29, 2018 19:25 |  #15

Snydremark wrote in post #18552002 (external link)
I wouldn't worry too much about bears ON Going To The Sun, but I'd be absolutely terrified to be caught on that road with any traffic on a cycle.

There is some accomodation to cyclists in the spring during road plowing, but in summer there are restrictions that may prevent some areas of access. Check https://www.nps.gov …anyourvisit/bic​ycling.htm (external link) for specific details.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,361 views & 4 likes for this thread
Glacier National Park lens options
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is HealthNskin
861 guests, 414 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.