Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 17 Feb 2018 (Saturday) 16:17
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Home printing vs. professional printing

 
Stefan ­ A
"The D is supposed to be where the S is!"
Avatar
2,638 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 27
Joined Jan 2006
Location: Southern York County, Pennsylvania
     
Feb 17, 2018 16:17 |  #1

I have a Canon pro-9000 which I have had for many years. It has served me well for prints I give away to family, friends, and for myself. I plan on making a go at selling some prints professionally to the public. I want to make my own frames, cut my own mats and provide a quality product (assuming people actually like my photography :)) The idea is to get into the craft/art show circuit and create a booth displaying my photos for sale. Ive made efforts to color correct my monitor and to match my paper to the correct profile. That's about as deep as I've gotten into DIY printing. If I sell a print, the last thing I need is for a customer to complain about the print quality years down the road. So, for longevity and for overall quality of the print, is professional printing more advantageous than home printing using my current setup?

Thanks
Stefan


80D, Canon 17-55mm f/2.8, Canon 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6, Canon 50mm f/1.4, Canon 70-200mm F/4L,Tokina 11-16 f/2.8, Canon 100-400 f/4.5-5.6, Kenko 1.4 TC, Canon 580 exII Speedlite, ebay wireless trigger, Genesis 3 light kit
santwarg.zenfolio.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
40,182 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2022
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
     
Feb 17, 2018 16:35 |  #2

If you have a Costco store near you, they produce excellent quality prints at a very inexpensive price that rivals the cost of printing your own


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
BigAl007
Cream of the Crop
7,697 posts
Gallery: 526 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 1473
Joined Dec 2010
Location: Repps cum Bastwick, Gt Yarmouth, Norfolk, UK.
     
Feb 17, 2018 22:47 |  #3

For a business venture I would be very careful in costing the final print. For printing on "Fine Art" papers I would think that you should be able to match a good pro lab for cost and quality on an apples for apples comparison, since you are based in the US. Remember though that most labs producing inkjet prints on "Fine Art" papers will be doing so using pigment inks. I don't know what type of ink your current printer uses.

For straight "C-Type" colour photographic prints on glossy, luster, pearl/metallic papers then a good lab may well be quite a bit cheaper than you could create similar at home. This is one category where like for like comparisons are not possible. But even so in the US you can get some very good deals on paper and ink that will still make printing it yourself cost effective. Longevity of the print in this situation can almost be down to the exact circumstances of the final display location. Hang almost any print in direct sunlight and it will deteriorate quite quickly regardless of process type.

One situation where it may be worthwhile finding a good lab is specialist output. I love to work in black and white, and I have found nothing that looks quite as good as a traditional black and white print on silver halide paper. I have found a lab that prints digital to Ilford MG IV paper, in both RC (glossy and luster) as well as a FB option. These are not cheap prints, but a discerning buyer would most likely be willing to pay the price for the ultimate in black and white quality. So it is at least worth knowing that these options exist.

Here in the UK things are actually quite a bit simpler, generally you should be able to find a pro quality lab that can produce prints that will be at the most only as expensive as the consumables that you would use doing it yourself. Doing the prints at home you would still need to allow for the cost of your printer. So in general DIY printing is not commercially cost effective to any degree. I've pretty much stopped doing A4 (12×8) sized prints on my Pixma MG5150, they cost about £2.50 each in consumables. The lab I use charges only £1.15 for A3/16×12 prints, so that is now my standard size for a print for my personal use.

Alan


My Flickr (external link)
My new Aviation images blog site (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Naturalist
Adrift on a lonely vast sea
Avatar
5,123 posts
Gallery: 43 photos
Likes: 327
Joined May 2007
Location: Tallgrass prairies of northwest Minnesota
     
Feb 17, 2018 22:51 |  #4

Stefan
I say 'go for it'. There is a deeper satisfaction that comes with making your own prints. It the conclusion to the creative process, just as the darkroom was to me years ago.


Doug
My Gear List
http://www.douglasbrow​nsr.com (external link)
Entered: 2-16-84 Passed: 5-22-84 Raised: 6-19-84

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
TeamSpeed
01010100 01010011
Avatar
33,273 posts
Gallery: 72 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 3539
Joined May 2002
Location: Northern Indiana
     
Feb 17, 2018 23:28 |  #5

Try to get the Canon paper deals, and I also reset my cartridge chips and refill the ink. This keeps printed costs down.


Past Equipment | My Gallery (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Stefan ­ A
THREAD ­ STARTER
"The D is supposed to be where the S is!"
Avatar
2,638 posts
Gallery: 11 photos
Likes: 27
Joined Jan 2006
Location: Southern York County, Pennsylvania
     
Feb 18, 2018 10:20 |  #6

Thanks everyone. To answer a question that was asked, my printer is dye based.


80D, Canon 17-55mm f/2.8, Canon 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6, Canon 50mm f/1.4, Canon 70-200mm F/4L,Tokina 11-16 f/2.8, Canon 100-400 f/4.5-5.6, Kenko 1.4 TC, Canon 580 exII Speedlite, ebay wireless trigger, Genesis 3 light kit
santwarg.zenfolio.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Quint ­ on ­ Trask
Member
Avatar
78 posts
Gallery: 9 photos
Likes: 99
Joined Apr 2015
Location: Oregon
     
Feb 18, 2018 12:46 |  #7

Stefan, I have an Epson 3880. No troubles for the three or four years I've used it. I print photos as well as fine art reproductions and also do the whole frame job included matte and glass cutting. I also print for another photographer which helps offset costs. 5" x 7" cards is a good way to keep the printer active. I use Red River Paper mostly. I found the learning and self printing to be very rewarding.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
agedbriar
Goldmember
Avatar
2,540 posts
Likes: 285
Joined Jan 2007
Location: Slovenia
Post edited 4 months ago by agedbriar.
     
Feb 18, 2018 14:59 |  #8

I too like to print myself, as I did in the darkroom days.

Currently I have a problem. I'm running out of the (discontinued) great swellable polymer paper, which keeps any third party ink from fading. I might have to switch to OEM ink, which I really wouldn't mind doing if I printed often enough. But running nozzle checks (to prevent clogging) on OEM ink is a pain. :-(




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
40,182 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2022
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
Post edited 3 months ago by Wilt.
     
Feb 18, 2018 21:25 |  #9

An important thing to keep in mind is that when you go to a 'commercial printer', the printing technology can be one of two types...


  1. inket print
  2. photo exposure processed in conventional chemicals


It is important to find out which methodology is used, so that it matches your expectations.

You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Silver-Halide
Senior Member
783 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 212
Joined Jan 2015
     
Feb 18, 2018 22:36 |  #10

IIRC dye based ink doesn't last as long as pigment inks.


Echoes in Eternity LLC | Tucson and Southern Arizona Wedding Photographer (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
agedbriar
Goldmember
Avatar
2,540 posts
Likes: 285
Joined Jan 2007
Location: Slovenia
Post edited 3 months ago by agedbriar.
     
Feb 19, 2018 03:21 |  #11

Silver-Halide wrote in post #18567110 (external link)
IIRC dye based ink doesn't last as long as pigment inks.

True, and that difference is exacerbated now that both ink types are used on the same micro/nanoporous fast drying paper.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
RMyers
Senior Member
296 posts
Gallery: 14 photos
Likes: 412
Joined Dec 2009
Location: Austin, TX
     
Feb 19, 2018 17:18 |  #12

Silver-Halide wrote in post #18567110 (external link)
IIRC dye based ink doesn't last as long as pigment inks.

Canon seems to be saying 100 years for the dye ink on the Pixma Pro-100, longer for the pigment on the Pro-10. I'm okay with 100 years. If someone buys a photo from me and it fades in a 100 years, I'll reprint it for them. :-)


Rusty
Austin, TX

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Wilt
Reader's Digest Condensed version of War and Peace [POTN Vol 1]
Avatar
40,182 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 2022
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Belmont, CA
     
Feb 19, 2018 18:34 |  #13

RMyers wrote in post #18567713 (external link)
Canon seems to be saying 100 years for the dye ink on the Pixma Pro-100, longer for the pigment on the Pro-10. I'm okay with 100 years. If someone buys a photo from me and it fades in a 100 years, I'll reprint it for them. :-)


'Lifetime guarantee'...your lifetime, or mine.


You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ShotByTom
Goldmember
Avatar
2,975 posts
Gallery: 10 photos
Likes: 75
Joined Aug 2005
Location: Indianapolis
     
Feb 19, 2018 19:54 |  #14

I love making my own prints. I use paper, canvas and other print media from Breathing Color. I love their products, and I really enjoy putting together the final product myself for clients. I don't produce all prints myself, I print larger prints, canvas prints, and Art Boards myself. Breathing Color sells a metal media that I want to try, but it hasn't been out long, so I'm waiting a bit. They also have a really good system for making Canvas Gallery Wraps!

I have an Epson Stylus Pro 7900 24" printer. I'm sure I would find it less expensive to use a lab for print products, but I really enjoy doing it myself.


Gear
Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
J ­ Michael
Senior Member
947 posts
Gallery: 7 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 47
Joined Feb 2010
Location: Atlanta
     
Feb 20, 2018 06:18 |  #15

Things have become a bit more complicated. Dye sub on various materials is now pretty common. Also, inkjet can vary - high volume narrow gamut printers commonly used for commercial quality printing versus low output wide gamut fine art printers. The skill of the technician and eye for color are a couple more variables to be aware of. There is a reason for the higher prices of fine art quality prints.

Wilt wrote in post #18567084 (external link)
An important thing to keep in mind is that when you go to a 'commercial printer', the printing technology can be one of two types...


  1. inket print
  2. photo exposure processed in conventional chemicals


It is important to find out which methodology is used, so that it matches your expectations.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,652 views & 4 likes for this thread
Home printing vs. professional printing
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Csyama1
925 guests, 397 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.