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Thread started 22 Feb 2018 (Thursday) 14:36
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How do I delete photos from memory cards?

 
Perfectly ­ Frank
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Feb 22, 2018 14:36 |  #1

I have a handful of SD and CF cards that I no longer use. I'd like to get a few bucks for them.
What's a good way of deleting images from the cards? Format the card in the camera, then repeat a few times?
Some one suggested taking video of a block wall, then deleting. Another said placing the card in a strong magnetic field.

What's a quick way of permanently wiping a card clean?


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Sibil
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Feb 22, 2018 14:38 |  #2

Formatting should do it. That is what I do.




  
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gjl711
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Feb 22, 2018 14:58 |  #3

Formatting will not get rid of the images. All a format will do is remove the image pointer from the FAT table. Image recovery software will still be able to get the images back. You can use a wipe program to make sure all data is gone, find an low level format program that will totally erase all data, or point the camera at your floor tiles and rapid fire away until the memory card fills up, then format. The last way will render nice images of your floor tiles if someone want to go through the trouble or recovering any images on the card.


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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Feb 22, 2018 15:08 |  #4

Low level format should be enough for most uses, assuming you haven't been taking pics of government spy operations.


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Tomi ­ Hawk
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Feb 22, 2018 15:15 |  #5

I just delete everything in camera after sending to a flash-drive ..
I'd be interested in the SD cards or a couple maybe?


  
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Bassat
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Feb 22, 2018 16:10 |  #6

Google 'recuva'. It is a file recovery program from Piriform. There is a free version. It has a 'secure erase' feature. I've been using it for years without issue.


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Bassat
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Feb 22, 2018 16:14 |  #7

Tomi Hawk wrote in post #18569946 (external link)
I just delete everything in camera after sending to a flash-drive ..

Sibil wrote in post #18569919 (external link)
Formatting should do it. That is what I do.

Left Handed Brisket wrote in post #18569942 (external link)
Low level format should be enough for most uses, assuming you haven't been taking pics of government spy operations.

None of these options will securely erase your cards, though 'low level' format at least over-writes the data sectors, not just the FAT.

Delete and Format do NOTHING to the actual data on the card; any data on the card before either operation is still there after either operation.


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Wilt
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Feb 22, 2018 16:18 |  #8

write over each card, filling it with a huge file that almost packs it to capacity!


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Feb 22, 2018 17:55 |  #9

If low level format writes zeros to everything (which is my understanding) that takes the typical recovery tools out of the discussion. They will be ineffective.

You then move to expensive professional level software. This software looks for "latent", for lack of a better term, evidence of a charge.


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Feb 22, 2018 18:31 |  #10

I am not sure that I understand why it would be so essential to ensure that the images are entirely deleted from the cards. I mean, if you format, then they are removed for all practical purposes. . The only way in which they would remain would be for impractical purposes, such as someone using data recovery software. . So what?

I checked out your Flickr site to see what kind of photos you normally take, and there isn't anything there that I would think is the kind of stuff that would normally be stolen and exploited. . What is it that you are so afraid of when it comes to somebody being able to gain access to your old, deleted images? . What would somebody want with them? . What would somebody do with them that would be so harmful to you?

I just don't understand why this would be such a big deal, and any explanation would be appreciated.


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cristphoto
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Feb 22, 2018 20:15 |  #11

I would first format the cards on a computer. Second I'd format again in the camera. Then I'd fill the card up with video files (if your camera has the ability). Take several clips of the sky for example. Finally I'd format once again.

Really unless the cards contain personal information or sensitive photos I wouldn't think anyone buying used camera cards would be into spying on the contents.


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Feb 22, 2018 20:17 |  #12

cristphoto wrote in post #18570094 (external link)
I would first format the cards on a computer. Second I'd format again in the camera. Then I'd fill the card up with video files (if your camera has the ability). Take several clips of the sky for example. Finally I'd format once again.

Really unless the cards contain personal information or sensitive photos I wouldn't think anyone buying used camera cards would be into spying on the contents.

As mentioned, format all you want, it does not delete files. save yourself some time and just fill the card with something.


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Wilt
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Feb 22, 2018 21:56 |  #13

Left Handed Brisket wrote in post #18570025 (external link)
If low level format writes zeros to everything (which is my understanding) that takes the typical recovery tools out of the discussion. They will be ineffective.

You then move to expensive professional level software. This software looks for "latent", for lack of a better term, evidence of a charge.

Indeed...

"Low-level formatting (i.e., closest to the hardware) marks the surfaces of the disks with markers indicating the start of a recording block (typically today called sector markers) and other information like block CRC to be used later, in normal operations, by the disk controller to read or write data. This is intended to be the permanent foundation of the disk, and is often completed at the factory..."

"User instigated low-level formatting (LLF) of hard disk drives was common for minicomputer and personal computer systems until the 1990s. IBM and other mainframe system vendors typically supplied their hard disk drives (or media in the case of removable media HDDs) with a low-level format. Typically this involved subdividing each track on the disk into one or more blocks which would contain the user data and associated control information. Different computers used different block sizes and IBM notably used variable block sizes but the popularity of the IBM PC caused the industry to adopt a standard of 512 user data bytes per block by the middle 1980s.

Depending upon the system, low-level formatting was generally done by an operating system utility. IBM compatible PCs used the BIOS, which is invoked using the MS-DOS debug program, to transfer control to a routine hidden at different addresses in different BIOSes"

"Today, an end-user, in most cases, should never perform a low-level formatting of an IDE or ATA hard drive, and in fact it is often not possible to do so on modern hard drives because the formatting is done on a servowriter before the disk is assembled into a drive in the factory."

But then...

"Some modern formatters wipe hard disks with a value of 0x00 instead, sometimes also called zero-filling, whereas a value of 0xFF is used on flash disks to reduce wear. The latter value is typically also the default value used on ROM disks (which cannot be reformatted). Some advanced formatting tools allow configuring the fill value.[nb 7]

One popular method for performing only the zero-fill operation on a hard disk is by writing zero-value bytes to the drive using the Unix dd utility with the /dev/zero stream as the input file and the drive itself (or a specific partition) as the output file.[16] This command may take many hours to complete, and can erase all files and file systems.

Another method for SCSI disks may be to use the sg_format[17] command to issue a low-level SCSI Format Unit Command.

Zero-filling a drive is not necessarily a secure method of erasing sensitive data[not in citation given], or of preparing a drive for use with an encrypted filesystem.


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Feb 23, 2018 04:54 |  #14

Wilt wrote in post #18570162 (external link)
Indeed...

[...lots of quoted text...]

Can you provide a source for this please?


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John ­ from ­ PA
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Feb 23, 2018 06:49 |  #15

mcoren wrote in post #18570282 (external link)
Can you provide a source for this please?

Much of what Wilt wrote came from Wikipedia, see https://en.wikipedia.o​rg/wiki/Disk_formattin​g (external link).

Why the need to overwrite everything exists is beyond me but if the OP is familiar with Windows you can use DISKPART to wipe the disk. The procedure is at https://www.howtogeek.​com …on-and-capacity-problems/ (external link) but follow the steps carefully.




  
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How do I delete photos from memory cards?
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