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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 26 Feb 2018 (Monday) 09:29
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maybe this is a lens question

 
chuckmiller
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Feb 26, 2018 09:29 |  #1

In harsh mid-day and overhead full sun does a CPL filter or a UV filter help tame the harsh light?


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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Feb 26, 2018 09:54 |  #2

UV does nothing, under any condition, ever. Some people use them to "protect" the lens.


You haven't said what you are taking pictures of, but generally if the sun is directly overhead a CPL will not have much effect ... depending on at what, and where you are pointing the camera.

It is intended to remove reflections and haze at angles less than 90 degrees to the camera.


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Tom ­ Reichner
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Feb 26, 2018 10:57 |  #3

chuckmiller wrote in post #18572561 (external link)
In harsh mid-day and overhead full sun does a CPL filter or a UV filter help tame the harsh light?

I don't know if any optics can ever tame the light itself, but what they may be able to do, at times, is to tame the effects of the light.

One of the major effects of midday sun is heat distortion. . This is a real problem, even when it is extremely cold out (some people mistakenly think that heat distortion is only a problem during warm or hot weather).

There are no optics - neither filters or lenses - that can tame heat distortion. . If you are facing heat distortion, there are two things that can be done:

1: . Don't bother shooting, and instead wait for the sun to lower in the sky.

2: . Get close to your subjects so that there isn't much distorted atmosphere between your subject and your camera.


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Post edited 3 months ago by TeamSpeed. (3 edits in all)
     
Feb 26, 2018 11:13 |  #4

chuckmiller wrote in post #18572561 (external link)
In harsh mid-day and overhead full sun does a CPL filter or a UV filter help tame the harsh light?

No these won't help, but having flash and/or reflectors to reduce the harsh contrast areas will, or moving to a more diffused lit area, or shaded areas.

The UV is a protective filter from dust/dirt, and nothing more really.

A polarizer will help eliminate light coming in from angles and if you have a circular polarizer, you can control from where it controls this. So sometimes reflections off water or glasses can be minimized with a CPL.


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chuckmiller
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Feb 26, 2018 11:24 |  #5

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18572646 (external link)
...The UV is a protective filter from dust/dirt, and nothing more really.

A polarizer will help eliminate light coming in from angles and if you have a circular polarizer, you can control from where it controls this. So sometimes reflections off water or glasses can be minimized with a CPL.

I like what it does to the color of the sky. ((HUMOR :-D))


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TeamSpeed
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Feb 26, 2018 11:30 as a reply to  @ chuckmiller's post |  #6

Sure, but when you mention harsh lighting and contrast with overhead sun, one assumes you mean the impacts of those on subject material on land in front of you. At least that is what I took from this, because that is the common issue faced by shooters for weddings, portraits, etc, and the desire of clients wanting their events during these times of day, instead of in the morning or near dusk. :)


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Feb 26, 2018 11:33 |  #7

Left Handed Brisket wrote in post #18572577 (external link)
UV does nothing, under any condition, ever.

Actually, UV filters were used back in the film days. Older color films had UV sensitivity in the blue layer, which resulted in a blue cast to photos taken under bright open sky, especially at higher altitudes. UV filters helped reduce this. People also used skylight filters, which were UV filters that had a slight, almost imperceptible warming tone (around 1.5 DM).

Whether or not you want a UV filter on a lens today is basically a religious issue. If you choose to use one, pick a high quality filter from a manufacturer like B+W or Hoya. Don't use the cheap $10 no-name filter that are sold on line. Those can definitely affect image quality.

Mike


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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Feb 26, 2018 11:33 |  #8

TeamSpeed wrote in post #18572663 (external link)
Sure, but when you mention harsh lighting and contrast with overhead sun, one assumes you mean the impacts of those on subject material on land in front of you. At least that is what I took from this, because that is the common issue faced by shooters for weddings, portraits, etc, and the desire of clients wanting their events during these times of day, instead of in the morning or near dusk. :)

Bingo.


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chuckmiller
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Feb 26, 2018 11:47 |  #9

post #5 updated.


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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Feb 26, 2018 11:56 |  #10

mcoren wrote in post #18572665 (external link)
Actually, UV filters were used back in the film days. Older color films had UV sensitivity in the blue layer, which resulted in a blue cast to photos taken under bright open sky, especially at higher altitudes. UV filters helped reduce this. People also used skylight filters, which were UV filters that had a slight, almost imperceptible warming tone (around 1.5 DM).

Excellent point. I even used UV and skylight filters back in the old days ... I should not have made such a sweeping statement.

chuckmiller wrote in post #18572677 (external link)
post #5 updated.

I had kind of read it like that, but wasn't sure.

"It makes things pretty!" lol


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chuckmiller
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Feb 26, 2018 12:09 |  #11

Left Handed Brisket wrote in post #18572683 (external link)
Excellent point.."It makes things pretty!" lol

Even better!!


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Post edited 3 months ago by Wilt.
     
Feb 26, 2018 19:13 |  #12

chuckmiller wrote in post #18572561 (external link)
In harsh mid-day and overhead full sun does a CPL filter or a UV filter help tame the harsh light?


Tame 'harsh light'...what does not mean to you?

  • reduce contrastiness of lighting
  • reduce blown out highlights (vs. shadow areas)
  • reduce squinting subjects


No, No, and No.

CPL and UV filter do none of those things.

So, if you better define what characterizes what causes 'harsh lights', you can better start to filter down the list of 'solutions' for yourself

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maybe this is a lens question
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