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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Architecture, Real-Estate & Buildings Talk 
Thread started 12 Jun 2018 (Tuesday) 14:03
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How much lighting and editing for RE photos of non-luxury homes?

 
mike_d
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Jun 12, 2018 14:03 |  #1

I may have an opportunity to start taking RE photos on the side. I'm an experienced amateur with lots of gear and am comfortable in Lightroom 6. I also have Photoshop Elements but I'm not as comfortable with it. I haven't shot houses so I've been watching Youtube videos on the subject. I know shooting RE photos doesn't pay a fortune so you can't spend all day perfecting each photo.

From watching mostly Rich Baum's and Nathan Cool's videos and trying different techniques in my own home, it seems like I could go one of two ways:

1) Flambient: One bounce-flash shot, one ambient shot, one direct flash shot per window, mask and blend in Photoshop. I was able to get pretty good results after a few tries. That flash shot can require considerable power to light properly. I have Einstein strobes and radio control, but that's not something I'd want to lug around and set up on site. I do have a Canon 580EXII and a YN-560 but sold my Cactus triggers when I stepped up to the Einsteins. The YN-560 does have an optical slave but it's not 100% reliable and obviously doesn't work through walls. So if I went this route, I'd want some more powerful battery-powered and radio-triggered lights.

2) Bracket shots with hotshoe flash bounced straight up, HDR in Lightroom: This one requires less gear, no round trip to PS, is fast and easy to shoot, but I don't like the result as well. It's not bad, way better than any phone or pop-up flash shots, but not as nice I can get with option 1 if I'm able to get the right shots. The windows still want to blow out and the foreground still looks a bit "flashy". Maybe that's something only photographers or art directors care about, not home shoppers or RE agents. I can use the local area adjustment tool in LR to pull the windows back, but the tool isn't as good as what's available in PS.

Which camp do you fall into? Could you offer #2 as a basic package and make #1 available for an extra charge?




  
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LVDJC
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Jun 14, 2018 18:44 |  #2

My suggestion would be number 1. You can get pretty quick at processing them in lightroom with presets that you can apply on import, then do a quick blend of layers in photoshop. My thought process is if you give sub par version 2 images then the realtor would not use you for the nicer listings that you can charge more for. You would also be building a Portfolio of how good your quality of work is with both smaller and larger homes. We may see smaller homes as not that important to spend any extra time on but the homeowner and those looking to buy will appreciate quality pics. You can also break down your pricing to 25 pics for less impressive and smaller listings and 35 pics for nicer listings. My 2 cents. Good luck.




  
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joooowan
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Jun 16, 2018 00:21 |  #3

from my experience with non-luxury homes. The realtor does NOT KNOW the difference, OR CARE between flambient and HDR. They don't want to pay for (or expect you to take anymore than) 1 hour at the house. It's kind of a dead end battle in my experience, just go with HDR.

I had a lot of talk and actually gotten in some heated arguments with realtors that doesn't quite understand the photo business or how much effort it takes to make their photos, I now work with some that realize good photos with lighting take a lot of time and trial and error and gives me pretty much whatever and however long I need to do the job. Life is way better now.


CC welcome.

  
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How much lighting and editing for RE photos of non-luxury homes?
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