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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Motorsports Talk 
Thread started 24 Jun 2018 (Sunday) 21:00
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Need filter advice for shooting into sunset

 
LevelPebble
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Post edited 2 months ago by LevelPebble.
     
Jun 24, 2018 21:00 |  #1

I am the photographer at a local short track. In the early part of the evening I struggle with shooting into the sunset for the Victory Lane shots.

I prefer to shoot from this side of the car because it let's the fans in the stands see it and also I don't want the stands as the background. I have a few ideas on how to avoid the situation with composition and changing my position, but wanted to learn more about filters

Don't have too much experience with filters, but was thinking either a Graduated ND filter or a Circular Polarizer would help me with this problem.

Anyone have any advice about either filters or camera settings?


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Motorsports Photographer for ARCA at Flat Rock/Toledo Speedway

  
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Jul 10, 2018 09:21 |  #2

LevelPebble wrote in post #18650810 (external link)
I am the photographer at a local short track. In the early part of the evening I struggle with shooting into the sunset for the Victory Lane shots.

I prefer to shoot from this side of the car because it let's the fans in the stands see it and also I don't want the stands as the background. I have a few ideas on how to avoid the situation with composition and changing my position, but wanted to learn more about filters

Don't have too much experience with filters, but was thinking either a Graduated ND filter or a Circular Polarizer would help me with this problem.

Anyone have any advice about either filters or camera settings?


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forum: Motorsports Talk

After waiting for a while for other responses, your best approach would not be a filter or even spot metering, but fill flash. Judicious use of an on-camera flash can balance the sort of back light you face.

https://www.digitalpho​tomentor.com/off-camera-flash-portraits/ (external link)




  
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Jul 10, 2018 09:35 |  #3

100 percent agree on use of flash.

An on camera external flash would do the trick. A softbox and battery powered strobe would be better. To balance the color temp with the background, use 1/4 CTS or 1/4 or 1/8 CTO gel.


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Jul 10, 2018 09:39 |  #4

Just noticed your settings.

Drop the ISO down to 100 or 200 and shutter speed to 1/200 or 1/100. This wil maximize your sensor performance ... shoot raw and you can recover highlights and shadows a bit.

Still use flash.


PSA: The above post may contain sarcasm, reply at your own risk | Not in gear database: Auto Sears 50mm 2.0 / 3x CL-360, Nikon SB-28, SunPak auto 322 D, Minolta 20

  
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gjl711
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Jul 10, 2018 10:10 |  #5

I agree that using a fill flash will help tremendously, but also rotating 45 degrees left or right so that the sun is not directly behind you subjects will do more. Rotate and fill flash.


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Need filter advice for shooting into sunset
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