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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 28 Jun 2018 (Thursday) 23:49
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Westcott Eyelighter vs. stripbox?

 
ZoranC
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Jun 28, 2018 23:49 |  #1

I have been looking at Westcott Eyelighter and was wondering would I be better off with a stripbox?

Way I see it pros of Eyelighter are that it has that nice wraparound illumination and attractive catchlight. Cons are that assembling it is hassle, it is bulky, and you can not control how much it will illuminate, plus you are limited how far from subject it can be.

On the other hand stripbox does not maybe result in as attractive illumination (but how bad it could be?) _but_ it is easier to set up, you can control amount of illumination it will provide, and it is flexible distance wise. Plus there would be one less modifier to carry.

So does anyone have experience with both of these setups? What are your thoughts?




  
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Angmo
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Jun 29, 2018 00:17 |  #2

ZoranC wrote in post #18653325 (external link)
I have been looking at Westcott Eyelighter and was wondering would I be better off with a stripbox?

Way I see it pros of Eyelighter are that it has that nice wraparound illumination and attractive catchlight. Cons are that assembling it is hassle, it is bulky, and you can not control how much it will illuminate, plus you are limited how far from subject it can be.

On the other hand stripbox does not maybe result in as attractive illumination (but how bad it could be?) _but_ it is easier to set up, you can control amount of illumination it will provide, and it is flexible distance wise. Plus there would be one less modifier to carry.

So does anyone have experience with both of these setups? What are your thoughts?

Pure marketing. Save your money.

Use a reflector. You can get 3 white or silver cake pans for reflectors from Walmart for $3. Tape them together in pairs or threes. Or use the ever versatile striplight.


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Osa713
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Post edited 2 months ago by Osa713.
     
Jun 29, 2018 00:24 |  #3

Depends on the look you want...The eyelighter will reduce or soften shadows under the chin, not totally remove them like a strip box.

I thought about getting one but for the cost I can add another Godox strobe to my arsenal. I went w/ a big reflector and I am happy so far. If I want a different look I will use a strip box.

Shameless plug I’m selling an extra strip box in the classified section :-P


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Strobo
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Jun 29, 2018 13:09 |  #4

ZoranC wrote in post #18653325 (external link)
I have been looking at Westcott Eyelighter and was wondering would I be better off with a stripbox?

Way I see it pros of Eyelighter are that it has that nice wraparound illumination and attractive catchlight. Cons are that assembling it is hassle, it is bulky, and you can not control how much it will illuminate, plus you are limited how far from subject it can be.

On the other hand stripbox does not maybe result in as attractive illumination (but how bad it could be?) _but_ it is easier to set up, you can control amount of illumination it will provide, and it is flexible distance wise. Plus there would be one less modifier to carry.

So does anyone have experience with both of these setups? What are your thoughts?

Using a strobe for fill over a reflector has a lot of advantages, one of the main ones being the ability to vary the amount of fill in precise increments from the camera position, as well as remotely turning fill on or off.

I just picked up an inexpensive 24x80 stripbox and plan to put it in use as an eyelighter alternative. It won't have the same curved catchlight as the eyelighter but it's wide enough to provide plenty of wraparound for individuals and should also work well for couples, small groups, etc..




  
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ZoranC
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Jun 29, 2018 14:06 |  #5

Osa713 wrote in post #18653347 (external link)
Depends on the look you want...The eyelighter will reduce or soften shadows under the chin, not totally remove them like a strip box.

Can one reduce/soften shadows under chin, rather than totally eliminating them, by lowering power used with strip box? I figure that should be possible and one could have fine control of how much those shadows are softened, especially if one has strobe that works in 1/10 of stop.




  
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ZoranC
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Jun 29, 2018 14:08 |  #6

Strobo wrote in post #18653629 (external link)
Using a strobe for fill over a reflector has a lot of advantages, one of the main ones being the ability to vary the amount of fill in precise increments from the camera position, as well as remotely turning fill on or off.

I just picked up an inexpensive 24x80 stripbox and plan to put it in use as an eyelighter alternative. It won't have the same curved catchlight as the eyelighter but it's wide enough to provide plenty of wraparound for individuals and should also work well for couples, small groups, etc..

Thank you, that has been my train of though too. I will be curious to see your results.




  
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Angmo
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Jun 29, 2018 17:10 |  #7

Here's a shot with Walmart cake pans. Just below her hands. This is uncropped to show the pan at the bottom. Cropped is a few inches above the hands.

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Osa713
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Jun 29, 2018 21:03 |  #8

ZoranC wrote in post #18653656 (external link)
Can one reduce/soften shadows under chin, rather than totally eliminating them, by lowering power used with strip box? I figure that should be possible and one could have fine control of how much those shadows are softened, especially if one has strobe that works in 1/10 of stop.

Absolutely, using a strip box is very versatile you can angle it to taste move it in to wrap the light around the subject or move it back. You can throw on a grid to control spill on the background. Lots of fun stuff


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ZoranC
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Jun 30, 2018 03:39 |  #9

Angmo wrote in post #18653742 (external link)
Here's a shot with Walmart cake pans.

I could never use cake pans, Walmart or not. I would just get distracted from the shoot thinking about cake.




  
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ZoranC
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Jun 30, 2018 03:40 |  #10

Osa713 wrote in post #18653826 (external link)
Absolutely, using a strip box is very versatile you can angle it to taste move it in to wrap the light around the subject or move it back. You can throw on a grid to control spill on the background. Lots of fun stuff

Thank you! I think I will go for strip box.




  
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dmward
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Post edited 2 months ago by dmward.
     
Jun 30, 2018 09:09 |  #11

Here is a rig I put together for headshots.
It works really well. One light for subject. One light through translucent background for white.
Used it Thursday for a job. AD200 in octa was at 1/4 power, AD360 in a shoot through umbrella behind the translucent background for even coverage was at 1/8 power.

I have the subject stand with chest against the silver reflector. Octa, with inner diffusion only is aimed down a bit to ensure bounce.

I have found that keeping the reflector flatter than in picture is better than tilted toward subject as in the picture.


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Left ­ Handed ­ Brisket
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Post edited 2 months ago by Left Handed Brisket.
     
Jun 30, 2018 14:37 |  #12

I had to google eyelighter.

All I can say is, wow, three hundred bucks for bendy tinfoil. Wow.

I use white foam core or a cheap, round, collapseable reflector.


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ZoranC
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Jun 30, 2018 15:12 |  #13

dmward wrote in post #18654030 (external link)
I have found that keeping the reflector flatter than in picture is better than tilted toward subject as in the picture.

Thank you, that is a great tip!




  
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Osa713
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Jun 30, 2018 15:18 |  #14

dmward wrote in post #18654030 (external link)
Here is a rig I put together for headshots.
It works really well. One light for subject. One light through translucent background for white.
Used it Thursday for a job. AD200 in octa was at 1/4 power, AD360 in a shoot through umbrella behind the translucent background for even coverage was at 1/8 power.

I have the subject stand with chest against the silver reflector. Octa, with inner diffusion only is aimed down a bit to ensure bounce.

I have found that keeping the reflector flatter than in picture is better than tilted toward subject as in the picture.

thumbnail
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forum: Flash and Studio Lighting


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./showthread.php?p=186​54030&i=i256190097
forum: Flash and Studio Lighting

Thanks for sharing your setup, my go to headshot setup is the same minus the ad200 as a background/ rim light.

I like how the shoot thru background wrapped around the cheek area, I wonder how that would look gelled? Going to experiment now lol.


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Angmo
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Jun 30, 2018 15:26 |  #15

ZoranC wrote in post #18653936 (external link)
I could never use cake pans, Walmart or not. I would just get distracted from the shoot thinking about cake.

It’s just white or silver covered cardboard. Located in the baking section.


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Westcott Eyelighter vs. stripbox?
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