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FORUMS General Gear Talk DIY & Customizing 
Thread started 08 Jul 2018 (Sunday) 20:59
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Anone using a 7" monitor for a viewfinder?

 
jeffreybehr
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Post edited 1 day ago by jeffreybehr. (2 edits in all)
     
Jul 08, 2018 20:59 |  #1

Two buddies are using different 7", 1920X1200-resolution monitors mounted to the rear of their cameras as viewfinders.
Here's one... https://www.bhphotovid​eo.com …finehd_on_locat​ion_7.html (external link)
and the second... https://www.bhphotovid​eo.com …_ips_ultra_thin​_full.html (external link)

Each is connected via HDMI and each fotog LOVES the improvement in visibility, including apparent resolution and MUCH easier manual focusing. At about $300 for the monitor system and two 6600mAh batteries and a charger, I'm seriously tempted to try one, as my 74-year-old eyes are NOT getting better! With various clamps and rails I've been accumutlating for 19 years, I've patched together what I believe is a fairly rigid-yet-liteweight mounting system that will rotate with the camera for a vertical frame. Here's a pic of one friend's system. It's a little difficult to see clearly how it goes together, but all the controls on his Canon 5D3 are usable.

Anyone using a similar system?


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In 2018, switched to my fourth Sony system, this time an a7R3. The third rendition of lenses includes a Loxia 21, Canon TS-Es in 24mm (II) and, starting July 05, 50mm Macro, and Sony zooms in 70-200/4 and 24-105/4.

  
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gjl711
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Jul 08, 2018 21:24 |  #2

I haven't used a 7" monitor but I use my 15? laptop often.

IMAGE: https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4430/36742354505_e13d959038_b.jpg

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rwmson
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Jul 11, 2018 06:41 |  #3

That field monitor is designed to mount on TOP of the camera using hot shoe ball head. Your photo appears to show it mounted to the rear of the camera somehow. In this configuration, none of the controls or the LCD on the rear of the camera would be accessible. That would be a non-starter for me.

Also, I find that my field monitor, which is connected via HDMI, to have rather slow response times compared to the camera's display. For example, take a shot and have to wait a second for the review image to appear on the field monitor, then wait another second for the screen to switch back to the camera settings screen. I find this latency to be bothersome and something for you to consider when weighing the advantages/disadvantag​es of using a field monitor.

I would however like to see more details on how your buddies are doing the rear-mount.


yeah, I gots some stuff.

  
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jeffreybehr
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Post edited 3 days ago by jeffreybehr.
     
Jul 13, 2018 20:15 |  #4

rwmson wrote in post #18660416 (external link)
That field monitor is designed to mount on TOP of the camera using hot shoe ball head. Your photo appears to show it mounted to the rear of the camera somehow.
It's mounted on a rail starting below the camera.

In this configuration, none of the controls or the LCD on the rear of the camera would be accessible. That would be a non-starter for me.
It's difficult to see in this pic from mostly the rear, but ALL the controls on the back fo the camera are usable.

Also, I find that my field monitor, which is connected via HDMI, to have rather slow response times compared to the camera's display. For example, take a shot and have to wait a second for the review image to appear on the field monitor, then wait another second for the screen to switch back to the camera settings screen. I find this latency to be bothersome and something for you to consider when weighing the advantages/disadvantag​es of using a field monitor.
I'll know more about that next week, after my monitor system arrives.

I would however like to see more details on how your buddies are doing the rear-mount.

Here's my start...a Kirk Long Rail Plate and a couple inexpensive 1"-wide clamps. Since the monitor rail clamps on the camera's L-bracket, the monitor will rotate with the camera for vertical frames.

My setup will be a few ounces lighter than Steve's. I'll post more pics next week. FWIW, the tripod is a temp.; my Gitzo/Cube is out for a small mod to the clamp.


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In 2018, switched to my fourth Sony system, this time an a7R3. The third rendition of lenses includes a Loxia 21, Canon TS-Es in 24mm (II) and, starting July 05, 50mm Macro, and Sony zooms in 70-200/4 and 24-105/4.

  
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jeffreybehr
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Post edited 3 days ago by jeffreybehr.
     
Jul 18, 2018 01:26 |  #5

Here's the second stage. At 2 pics per post, it may take a while. But first, the cable is temporary; I'm looking for an HDMI cable with 90-degree connectors on each end. Also temporary are the aluminum spacers between the Cube's centerpost and the Kirk clamp screwed to it. The entire camera-and-monitor assembly lifts off the Cube tripod head upon loosening one clamp.

The monitor system rotates with the camera for vertical frames; I loosen the Cube's clamp, lift and rotate the camera, slide the normally vertical portion of the L-bracket into the Cube's clamp, and tighten the clamp. The monitor battery, an NP-F type, is rated at 6600mAh (the largest B&H had), and latches onto the monitor's back rather securely. Probably I'll slide the monitor forward on its rail maybe a half-inch. It's rather light (at least IMO) at 2 pounds, 1 ounce (930 grams) including the monitor and its anchor screw, big battery, rail, clamp, and too-long cable.


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In 2018, switched to my fourth Sony system, this time an a7R3. The third rendition of lenses includes a Loxia 21, Canon TS-Es in 24mm (II) and, starting July 05, 50mm Macro, and Sony zooms in 70-200/4 and 24-105/4.

  
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jeffreybehr
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Post edited 3 days ago by jeffreybehr.
     
Jul 18, 2018 01:32 |  #6

For my Arca Cube, we had to raise its clamp off the centerpost a quarter-inch so that the new 1"-wide clamp and Kirk Long Rail Plate would clear the rest of the Cube. To be clear on this, the camera's L-bracket clamps to the Cube's replacement, 1-1/2-inch-wide clamp, and the monitor's rail-clamp clamps to the left side of the camera's L-bracket.


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In 2018, switched to my fourth Sony system, this time an a7R3. The third rendition of lenses includes a Loxia 21, Canon TS-Es in 24mm (II) and, starting July 05, 50mm Macro, and Sony zooms in 70-200/4 and 24-105/4.

  
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jeffreybehr
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Jul 18, 2018 01:48 |  #7

I'll take more pics of details if anyone asks. The monitor-anchor nut and screw are temporary. After I figure out where I want to park the monitor front-to-back, my friend will make a simple plate to go under the rail for the screw to go thru.


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In 2018, switched to my fourth Sony system, this time an a7R3. The third rendition of lenses includes a Loxia 21, Canon TS-Es in 24mm (II) and, starting July 05, 50mm Macro, and Sony zooms in 70-200/4 and 24-105/4.

  
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jeffreybehr
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Post edited 1 day ago by jeffreybehr. (2 edits in all)
     
Jul 18, 2018 02:03 |  #8

Here are two from the bottom. I doubt you'd have to thin your rail and clamp to clear your tripod head. Here...

https://www.amazon.com …age_o01_s00?ie=​UTF8&psc=1 (external link)

...is the 1"-wide clamp I bought three of; I used only two. I already had the 1-1/2"-wide Kirk clamp now mounted on the Cube (which I LOVE, BTW). What size clamps you chose depends on the width of your camera's L-bracket.

My friend made the black-painted L-bracket that's double-sided-sticky-taped to the base of the monitor as a JIC reinforcement of its 1/4"-20 screwhole.


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In 2018, switched to my fourth Sony system, this time an a7R3. The third rendition of lenses includes a Loxia 21, Canon TS-Es in 24mm (II) and, starting July 05, 50mm Macro, and Sony zooms in 70-200/4 and 24-105/4.

  
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Audii-Dudii
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Jul 18, 2018 04:17 as a reply to  @ rwmson's post |  #9

I would however like to see more details on how your buddies are doing the rear-mount.

I'm one of the friends Jeffrey referred to in his posts above. Tinkering with cameras is my daytime hobby and photographing with them is my nighttime hobby. :lol:

As such, my camera rig is constantly evolving (and I like to think it's also improving, but that's a matter of opinion, I suppose), but here's a recent photo of the monitor setup I was using until Jeffrey bought from me earlier this week the monitor in the photo below.

That's because, based on my success using this 7", 1920 x 1200 resolution HDMI monitor over the past year, I decided to replace it with an even larger, even higher resolution, 10.1" 2560 x 1600 monitor.

Anyway, as the photo shows, the monitor is mounted to the A7R via an aluminum bracket screwed to the camera's tripod hole. This particular bracket is made from two pieces of aluminum angle screwed together, so it has a Z shape that allows the OEM LCD to be pulled as far away from the A7R body as possible. This reduces the LCD's ability to heat the A7R body and also increases the body's ability to shed heat from the sensor. (This is also why I am using an external battery to power both the camera and monitor, because I do a lot of long-exposure photography and the cooler the sensor, the lower the amount of noise it creates and becomes visible.)

I am also using a ribbon HDMI cable instead of the more common rubber jacketed cables to save some weight -- it's hard to tell from looking at this photo, but I am very weight conscious when it comes to my cameras -- and its smaller, less obtrusive size improves accessibility to the A7R's back-panel controls, which I can easily operate with the monitor positioned at this distance.


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Audii-Dudii
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Jul 18, 2018 11:22 |  #10

jeffreybehr wrote in post #18665103 (external link)
But first, the cable is temporary; I'm looking for an HDMI cable with 90-degree connectors on each end.

As we discussed, I strongly suggest that instead of a cable with 90-degree connectors, you look for right-angle adapters for each end of the HDMI cable.

This way, you can leave the adapters more-or-less permanently attached to the camera and monitor and transfer the wear from repeatedly plugging-and-unplugging the cables to the adapters, which are inexpensive and easy to replace, unlike the connectors / circuit boards inside the camera and monitor.




  
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rwmson
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Jul 19, 2018 07:13 |  #11

Thanks for posting the setups!


yeah, I gots some stuff.

  
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Anone using a 7" monitor for a viewfinder?
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