Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS General Gear Talk Changing Camera Brands 
Thread started 10 Aug 2018 (Friday) 09:28
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Canon + Sony Combination

 
RPCrowe
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
7,971 posts
Likes: 902
Joined Nov 2005
Location: San Diego County, California, USA
     
Aug 10, 2018 09:28 |  #1

I have been married to Canon since the 10D eons ago. It has been a decent relationship but, lately has become a Love-Hate relationship.

I really enjoyed my 40D and 7D cameras and absolutely love my 7D2. I needed a full frame camera because the area in which I shoot my dog portraits doesn't allow me enough room to back up far enough to capture a larger dog with the 70mm side of my 70-200mm f/4L IS lens which is my lens of choice when shooting dogs.

A few years ago, I found a 5D2 that was in minty shape at a very good price. I sold my 7D and the proceeds came quite close to funding the 5D2. I really liked that camera and began to shoot people outdoors using the 70-200mm lens on the full frame and a 17-55mm on my 7D2. That was a great focal range combination because there was no gap in coverage between the two lenses. In fact, there was a bit of overlap in coverage which I like. However, the AF of the 5D2 was not all that great.

I made a big mistake and purchased the 6D2 without researching the camera. There are some things that I really like about the 6D2 but many things that I absolutely detest... Primarily, this has to do with autofocus when shooting with the eye level viewfinder. In a word... The eye level AF of the 6D2 simply sucks with the 80D style AF array centered in the middle of the frame. It is nasty for shooting portraits since the highest AF point places my subjects eyes towards the center of the frame. Focus and recompose is O.K. in a studio setting but is not feasible outdoors when shooting with a very wide aperture to blur the background. Using live view with the excellent dual point AF and face detect would solve that problem but, I just don't like using live view outside. I find myself choosing the 7D2 over the 6D2 more and more.

I have been researching cameras, especially along the Sony line; since with adapters, I can still use my great Canon glass and since bu just purchasing a new Godox XTPro trigger, I can use all my Godox equipment.

At first, I was attracted by a used Sony A7Rii which a local guy is selling (the A7Riii is too expensive for me to consider). However, with the advent of the A7iii. I am looking into that camera. However, I want to find one to rent for a weekend of shooting before I make my decision...


See my images at http://rpcrowe.smugmug​.com/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Charlie
Guess What! I'm Pregnant!
14,966 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 5103
Joined Sep 2007
     
Aug 10, 2018 09:41 |  #2

RPCrowe wrote in post #18681422 (external link)
I have been married to Canon since the 10D eons ago. It has been a decent relationship but, lately has become a Love-Hate relationship.

I really enjoyed my 40D and 7D cameras and absolutely love my 7D2. I needed a full frame camera because the area in which I shoot my dog portraits doesn't allow me enough room to back up far enough to capture a larger dog with the 70mm side of my 70-200mm f/4L IS lens which is my lens of choice when shooting dogs.

A few years ago, I found a 5D2 that was in minty shape at a very good price. I sold my 7D and the proceeds came quite close to funding the 5D2. I really liked that camera and began to shoot people outdoors using the 70-200mm lens on the full frame and a 17-55mm on my 7D2. That was a great focal range combination because there was no gap in coverage between the two lenses. In fact, there was a bit of overlap in coverage which I like. However, the AF of the 5D2 was not all that great.

I made a big mistake and purchased the 6D2 without researching the camera. There are some things that I really like about the 6D2 but many things that I absolutely detest... Primarily, this has to do with autofocus when shooting with the eye level viewfinder. In a word... The eye level AF of the 6D2 simply sucks with the 80D style AF array centered in the middle of the frame. It is nasty for shooting portraits since the highest AF point places my subjects eyes towards the center of the frame. Focus and recompose is O.K. in a studio setting but is not feasible outdoors when shooting with a very wide aperture to blur the background. Using live view with the excellent dual point AF and face detect would solve that problem but, I just don't like using live view outside. I find myself choosing the 7D2 over the 6D2 more and more.

I have been researching cameras, especially along the Sony line; since with adapters, I can still use my great Canon glass and since bu just purchasing a new Godox XTPro trigger, I can use all my Godox equipment.

At first, I was attracted by a used Sony A7Rii which a local guy is selling (the A7Riii is too expensive for me to consider). However, with the advent of the A7iii. I am looking into that camera. However, I want to find one to rent for a weekend of shooting before I make my decision...

uh, you're in SD? There should be a lot of folks that have one in your area. I know a lot of folks that have the 7iii in LA area. IMO, best if you can try out and have someone locally give you pointers, because unlike most Canon's, the late model A7's have a TON of configure options, that can take weeks to get down to your liking.

I've ran into a few shooters that were interested in trying out my R3 from last year.... they have since switched. Knowing how to efficiently use the system can take some time. I ran into a few 7iii users and even tried one out. Very very similar to the R3, so trying out either one will be practically the same. Stick with Gen 3 bodies, the upgrade is really worth it if you're to list them. In practice, the battery, firmware, AF, collectively make a HUGE difference in usability. I still have the R2 along with the R3, and they are completely different cameras despite looking the same.


Sony A7rii/A7riii - FE 12-24/4 - FE 24-240 - FE 35/2.8 - SY 35/1.4 AF - FE 50/1.8 - FE 85/1.8 - EF 135/1.8 Art - F 600/5.6 - CZ 100-300 - Astro Rok 14/2.8 - Tamron 28-75/2.8 RXD, 70-200/2.8 VC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
DC ­ Fan
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
5,876 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 47
Joined Oct 2005
     
Aug 10, 2018 12:28 as a reply to  @ Charlie's post |  #3

Another Canon and Sony combination, but this may be too expensive and heavy for many users.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Mbell1975
Member
248 posts
Likes: 60
Joined Jul 2018
Post edited 1 month ago by Mbell1975. (3 edits in all)
     
Aug 10, 2018 14:27 |  #4
bannedPermanent ban

RPCrowe wrote in post #18681422 (external link)
In a word... The eye level AF of the 6D2 simply sucks with the 80D style AF array centered in the middle of the frame. It is nasty for shooting portraits since the highest AF point places my subjects eyes towards the center of the frame. Focus and recompose is O.K. in a studio setting but is not feasible outdoors when shooting with a very wide aperture to blur the background.

I have been shooting fashion/glamour professionally for 15 years and have been doing it with Canon aside from a few flirts with Sony and Panasonic. If you can't focus and recompose properly outdoors with a wide aperture, you need to work on your photography skills. I do this with fast primes on a weekly basis and with results good enough to be published in major magazines around the world. T5i, T6i, 60D, 77D, 6D...I have used them all (still use the 77D and 6D) doesnt matter. I can consistently reproduce the same results with any camera and thats what being a pro is all about really. I also know a TON of other portrait shooters who do the same. Rent the Sony first. We are spoiled by Canon's superior color science and skin tones, you will hate the look of your portraits straight out of the Sony if you are used to Canon. Then you will spend hours trying to fix it to look like a Canon image, waste of time and money IMO.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mystik610
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
8,083 posts
Gallery: 26 photos
Likes: 7440
Joined Jan 2012
Location: Houston, TX
Post edited 1 month ago by mystik610.
     
Aug 10, 2018 17:15 |  #5

RPCrowe wrote in post #18681422 (external link)
I have been married to Canon since the 10D eons ago. It has been a decent relationship but, lately has become a Love-Hate relationship.

I really enjoyed my 40D and 7D cameras and absolutely love my 7D2. I needed a full frame camera because the area in which I shoot my dog portraits doesn't allow me enough room to back up far enough to capture a larger dog with the 70mm side of my 70-200mm f/4L IS lens which is my lens of choice when shooting dogs.

A few years ago, I found a 5D2 that was in minty shape at a very good price. I sold my 7D and the proceeds came quite close to funding the 5D2. I really liked that camera and began to shoot people outdoors using the 70-200mm lens on the full frame and a 17-55mm on my 7D2. That was a great focal range combination because there was no gap in coverage between the two lenses. In fact, there was a bit of overlap in coverage which I like. However, the AF of the 5D2 was not all that great.

I made a big mistake and purchased the 6D2 without researching the camera. There are some things that I really like about the 6D2 but many things that I absolutely detest... Primarily, this has to do with autofocus when shooting with the eye level viewfinder. In a word... The eye level AF of the 6D2 simply sucks with the 80D style AF array centered in the middle of the frame. It is nasty for shooting portraits since the highest AF point places my subjects eyes towards the center of the frame. Focus and recompose is O.K. in a studio setting but is not feasible outdoors when shooting with a very wide aperture to blur the background. Using live view with the excellent dual point AF and face detect would solve that problem but, I just don't like using live view outside. I find myself choosing the 7D2 over the 6D2 more and more.

I have been researching cameras, especially along the Sony line; since with adapters, I can still use my great Canon glass and since bu just purchasing a new Godox XTPro trigger, I can use all my Godox equipment.

At first, I was attracted by a used Sony A7Rii which a local guy is selling (the A7Riii is too expensive for me to consider). However, with the advent of the A7iii. I am looking into that camera. However, I want to find one to rent for a weekend of shooting before I make my decision...

Eye AF is probably the best thing to happen to portrait photography in the past decade. Not only is is it dead on accurate, it eliminates the need to change af points, or in the case of focus and recompose, eliminates the need to get the initial focus acquisition between shots. Wherever you frame your subjects eyes, the af system follows. Biggest benefit to me is that it greatly improves the flow of a typical shoot...particularly when working with a model who knows how to flow through her poses and you're not breaking the flow by messing with af between shots.

Works with adapted lenses too. I have an ef mount sigma 135 1.8 in my kit. Really narrow DOF wide open, but very reliable for outdoor portraits.


focalpointsphoto.com (external link) - flickr (external link) - Instagram (external link)
α7ʀII - RX1ʀII - α7ʀIII
Zeiss Loxia 21 - Canon 24-70 2.8LII - Sony/Zeiss 35 f1.4 ZA - Sony 50 1.8 - Sony 85GM - Sigma 135 f1.8 ART

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Mbell1975
Member
248 posts
Likes: 60
Joined Jul 2018
Post edited 1 month ago by Mbell1975. (2 edits in all)
     
Aug 10, 2018 17:38 |  #6
bannedPermanent ban

RPCrowe wrote in post #18681422 (external link)
I have been researching cameras, especially along the Sony line; since with adapters, I can still use my great Canon glass and since bu just purchasing a new Godox XTPro trigger, I can use all my Godox equipment.

I also forgot to mention that you will hate the EVF in a studio with strobes, inferior to an OVF in every way because WYSIWYG is useless when you are working with strobes. Not only that but Sony intentionally cripples their cameras (unless something has changed with the 3rd gens) forcing you to buy a Sony adapter to work properly with certain flashes and triggers which is even more petty than them not including a battery charger on a $2k camera. Rent one first, you'll be glad you did.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Osa713
Goldmember
Avatar
1,218 posts
Gallery: 42 photos
Likes: 743
Joined Jun 2011
Location: Houston, TX
     
Aug 10, 2018 17:50 |  #7

Mbell1975 wrote in post #18681680 (external link)
I also forgot to mention that you will hate the EVF in a studio with strobes, inferior to an OVF in every way because WYSIWYG is useless when you are working with strobes. Not only that but Sony intentionally cripples their cameras (unless something has changed with the 3rd gens) forcing you to buy a Sony adapter to work properly with certain flashes and triggers which is even more petty than them not including a battery charger on a $2k camera. Rent one first, you'll be glad you did.

You simply turn the preview exposure off.
I use it so much I have the on and off mapped to my up directional pad ;-)a


LIGHT>LENS>BODY

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Hogloff
Cream of the Crop
7,606 posts
Likes: 413
Joined Apr 2003
Location: British Columbia
     
Aug 10, 2018 18:34 |  #8
bannedBack in 5 months

mystik610 wrote in post #18681668 (external link)
Eye AF is probably the best thing to happen to portrait photography in the past decade. Not only is is it dead on accurate, it eliminates the need to change af points, or in the case of focus and recompose, eliminates the need to get the initial focus acquisition between shots. Wherever you frame your subjects eyes, the af system follows. Biggest benefit to me is that it greatly improves the flow of a typical shoot...particularly when working with a model who knows how to flow through her poses and you're not breaking the flow by messing with af between shots.

Works with adapted lenses too. I have an ef mount sigma 135 1.8 in my kit. Really narrow DOF wide open, but very reliable for outdoor portraits.

Eye AF is one of those technology leaps that 5 years from now you'll be asking how the hell did we manage without it. It truly takes the hassle of focusing out of the equation and let's you concentrate on composition and getting the precise expression...leaving the drudgery of focus and recompose or playing the put the little rectangle box over what you want in focus ( and then hoping it didn't pick up the nose rather than the eye ) games.

Like with any huge advancements...there are those that dig their heels into the dirt and refuse to adapt...even posting an image to show you don't need eye AF...but then there are those that just adapt it and move on smiling. :-D




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Hogloff
Cream of the Crop
7,606 posts
Likes: 413
Joined Apr 2003
Location: British Columbia
     
Aug 10, 2018 18:35 |  #9
bannedBack in 5 months

Osa713 wrote in post #18681689 (external link)
You simply turn the preview exposure off.
I use it so much I have the on and off mapped to my up directional pad ;-)a

Yep adapt rather than resist...the smart move.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Lyndön
Goldmember
2,080 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Best ofs: 1
Likes: 165
Joined Oct 2008
Location: Knoxville, TN
     
Aug 10, 2018 18:47 |  #10

Everyone’s entitled to their own opinion, but I personally find that shooting portraits on the A7iii (and my Oly EM1.2) is a better experience than on Canon. As said before, EyeAF works amazingly well and frees up my attention to work more on posing and the little things I usually miss and try to fix in PS/LR later. I personally love the EVF for portraits, even using strobes, since I have a custom button set to mimic an OVF (preview OFF) and it’ll give me a brief pop-up review of the image in the viewfinder. It’s great to be able to see your lighting and if someone’s eyes are open even if you’re outside in the blazing sun where the rear LCD is pretty useless. It’s also quicker for me to get my underexposure of the background dialed in quicker, since I don’t have to take test shots... then I just flip on the flash (preview OFF) and start shooting and don’t have to take my eye away from the viewfinder and interrupt the flow of things. I also use Flashpoint/Godox gear and it works pretty well for me. I not a full time pro, so I don’t usually put tons of stress on my gear and push its limits, but the Sony has made it quicker and easier for me to get good results. Could I get the same results using my Canon gear? Sure, but it would just take a little more time. It’s just two different methods of shooting, and some people will prefer one over the other.


GEAR LIST

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Charlie
Guess What! I'm Pregnant!
14,966 posts
Gallery: 8 photos
Likes: 5103
Joined Sep 2007
     
Aug 10, 2018 19:31 |  #11

Lyndön wrote in post #18681708 (external link)
Everyone’s entitled to their own opinion, but I personally find that shooting portraits on the A7iii (and my Oly EM1.2) is a better experience than on Canon. As said before, EyeAF works amazingly well and frees up my attention to work more on posing and the little things I usually miss and try to fix in PS/LR later. I personally love the EVF for portraits, even using strobes, since I have a custom button set to mimic an OVF (preview OFF) and it’ll give me a brief pop-up review of the image in the viewfinder. It’s great to be able to see your lighting and if someone’s eyes are open even if you’re outside in the blazing sun where the rear LCD is pretty useless. It’s also quicker for me to get my underexposure of the background dialed in quicker, since I don’t have to take test shots... then I just flip on the flash (preview OFF) and start shooting and don’t have to take my eye away from the viewfinder and interrupt the flow of things. I also use Flashpoint/Godox gear and it works pretty well for me. I not a full time pro, so I don’t usually put tons of stress on my gear and push its limits, but the Sony has made it quicker and easier for me to get good results. Could I get the same results using my Canon gear? Sure, but it would just take a little more time. It’s just two different methods of shooting, and some people will prefer one over the other.

For outdoor sun, turn on sunny weather LCD brightness, should help a lot, I have no issues with the sun.


Sony A7rii/A7riii - FE 12-24/4 - FE 24-240 - FE 35/2.8 - SY 35/1.4 AF - FE 50/1.8 - FE 85/1.8 - EF 135/1.8 Art - F 600/5.6 - CZ 100-300 - Astro Rok 14/2.8 - Tamron 28-75/2.8 RXD, 70-200/2.8 VC

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
mystik610
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
8,083 posts
Gallery: 26 photos
Likes: 7440
Joined Jan 2012
Location: Houston, TX
     
Aug 10, 2018 22:35 |  #12

Lyndön wrote in post #18681708 (external link)
Everyone’s entitled to their own opinion, but I personally find that shooting portraits on the A7iii (and my Oly EM1.2) is a better experience than on Canon. As said before, EyeAF works amazingly well and frees up my attention to work more on posing and the little things I usually miss and try to fix in PS/LR later. I personally love the EVF for portraits, even using strobes, since I have a custom button set to mimic an OVF (preview OFF) and it’ll give me a brief pop-up review of the image in the viewfinder. It’s great to be able to see your lighting and if someone’s eyes are open even if you’re outside in the blazing sun where the rear LCD is pretty useless. It’s also quicker for me to get my underexposure of the background dialed in quicker, since I don’t have to take test shots... then I just flip on the flash (preview OFF) and start shooting and don’t have to take my eye away from the viewfinder and interrupt the flow of things. I also use Flashpoint/Godox gear and it works pretty well for me. I not a full time pro, so I don’t usually put tons of stress on my gear and push its limits, but the Sony has made it quicker and easier for me to get good results. Could I get the same results using my Canon gear? Sure, but it would just take a little more time. It’s just two different methods of shooting, and some people will prefer one over the other.

Yup that's been my experience as well. The thing about the Sony system is that once you get used to it, the camera simply gets out of the way and let's you focus on directing your subject, lighting...just overall less messing around with the camera and focusing (pardon the pun) more on composition and maintaining a nice flow when working with live subjects.


focalpointsphoto.com (external link) - flickr (external link) - Instagram (external link)
α7ʀII - RX1ʀII - α7ʀIII
Zeiss Loxia 21 - Canon 24-70 2.8LII - Sony/Zeiss 35 f1.4 ZA - Sony 50 1.8 - Sony 85GM - Sigma 135 f1.8 ART

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Mbell1975
Member
248 posts
Likes: 60
Joined Jul 2018
     
Aug 10, 2018 23:14 |  #13
bannedPermanent ban

Osa713 wrote in post #18681689 (external link)
You simply turn the preview exposure off.
I use it so much I have the on and off mapped to my up directional pad ;-)a

Right, and that totally defeats the purpose of an EVF and its completely inferior to a quality OVF in a dark studio with its lag and crappy image.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
clipper_from_oz
Goldmember
Avatar
2,320 posts
Likes: 7118
Joined Sep 2005
Location: Melbourne Australia
     
Aug 11, 2018 08:26 |  #14

DC Fan wrote in post #18681530 (external link)
Another Canon and Sony combination, but this may be too expensive and heavy for many users.

thumbnail
Hosted photo: posted by DC Fan in
./showthread.php?p=186​81530&i=i229524536
forum: Changing Camera Brands

9.3 to 930mm F1.7!!! Man what a zoom ......wouldnt mind having that on my 5DSR if was just a tad smaller :)....I shudder to think how much that lens is worth......


Clipper
5DSR,5DMkII,Fuji XPRO1,X-T1&X-T20,Fotoman 6x17cm Large Format Panorama Camera,Mamiya Universal 6x9
Canon EF 16-35mm f4 L, 17mm TSE f4 L,50mm f1.4, 24-70 f2.8 L, 70-200mm F4 L, 85mm f1.8, 100-400mm II L,
EF 400mm f2.8 IS II L, Fujinon XF18mmf2, XF35mmf1.4, XF60mm f2, XF18-55f2.8-4.5, XF55-200f4
Rodenstock, Sinar& Nikkor LF lens for Pano (75,95,150+210mm)
flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Osa713
Goldmember
Avatar
1,218 posts
Gallery: 42 photos
Likes: 743
Joined Jun 2011
Location: Houston, TX
Post edited 1 month ago by Osa713.
     
Aug 11, 2018 09:02 |  #15

Mbell1975 wrote in post #18681865 (external link)
Right, and that totally defeats the purpose of an EVF and its completely inferior to a quality OVF in a dark studio with its lag and crappy image.

Lol have you used this feature before because that’s not how it works.

When you turn the preview exposure off the evf can “see in the dark” and properly exposes your subject in your viewfinder. So in a very dim studio you can easily see your subject before the strobe fires. ;-)a speaking from experience the Fuji X-T2/H1 and Sony AR3 /A9 have no lag the quality is amazing.


LIGHT>LENS>BODY

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,359 views & 11 likes for this thread
Canon + Sony Combination
FORUMS General Gear Talk Changing Camera Brands 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is dustin.maciejewski
772 guests, 436 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.