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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Macro Talk 
Thread started 28 Aug 2018 (Tuesday) 23:18
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What a tripod for macro photography?

 
Oleg2010
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Aug 28, 2018 23:18 |  #1

Hello

what a tripod for macro photography, flowers, insects?

What is important in this type of shooting,meaningfully 90 degree center column ?




  
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Ah-keong
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Aug 29, 2018 01:38 |  #2

I would recommend the Manfrotto 055xpro3 aluminum tripod with the mhxpro-3w head if you need.


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Temma
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Sep 04, 2018 19:16 |  #3

An intelligent recommendation requires more information:

  • What sort of macro photography do you intend to do? Indoor? Outdoor?
  • What level of magnification are you doing? 1:1? 2x? 4x? 10x?


Most of my macro photography is indoors in a living room with a "live" floor that makes it literally impossible to use a tripod physically separate from the subject stage. You can literally see the subject and camera move relative to each other when you shift from one foot to the other.



  
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Wilt
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Sep 04, 2018 19:58 |  #4

There are tripods with center columns that tilt, tripods whose legs can spread super wide to get the head very low to the ground, tripods with center columns which invert in order to get super low to the ground.

There are 'arms' like this one which mount onto the head mount of the center column to allow the head to be mounted out to one side...

IMAGE: http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i63/wiltonw/Equipment/Bogen-1_zps8obi9egh.jpg
IMAGE: http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i63/wiltonw/Equipment/Canon-1.jpg

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sawsedge
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Sep 04, 2018 22:54 |  #5

I've done a lot of closeups. I've used two tripods in the last 30 years. A Bogen 3221 was my first one (aluminum) and it was pretty good when the legs were not extended. It was a little prone to vibration when the legs were extended. I upgraded years ago to a carbon fiber Gitzo 3-series and haven't needed anything else since.

As others have indicated, the surface you place the tripod upon makes a big difference in stability. As mentioned, I also see the image shift when I'm inside my house and shift my weight. Concrete, solid earth, etc, are best.

I have never wanted/needed a tilting column. Never. Independent leg spread (and the ability to go to ground level) has been enough. Keep the camera centered over the apex for the best stability.

The more magnification you want to use, the stronger the tripod I would recommend. If you are not going on long walks with it, I'd even say the heaviest, highest end Gitzo or RRS would be best (4 or 5 series). They are pricey, but odds are good you'll never need another. You may want other tripods for other uses, but if the main use is macro, get something extra sturdy.

A short center column is useful. It is *much* easier to make fine adjustments by raising/lowering the column vs adjusting the legs when you are really close. With a high-quality tripod, a couple inches won't destabilize your rig. The camera is still centered over the apex of the tripod. I shortened the centerpost on my 3-series Gitzo to give me up to 5" of travel, and haven't seen any additional vibration when raised all 5" (I rarely need more than 1-2"). People will argue about it; this is just my experience.

A solid, precise head makes a big difference. All ballheads will shift a bit as you tighten them, but I found that the larger FLM ballheads barely shift at all. I am totally sold on FLM. But anything strong will work. Some might prefer a geared head depending on the magnification.

When I go higher than 1:1 magnification, I find a focusing rail handy - particularly with a bellows lens. But even a couple inches off center from the apex noticeably lowers the stability (this is where I think a bigger, heavier tripod might help).

Good technique helps too. Use a remote release, live view (this will avoid mirror slap if you have a DSLR - and also saves your neck and back from aches), hold your breath, don't shift your weight, don't touch the tripod or camera during exposure... And wind is your enemy. The softest breeze looks like a gale at 1:1.

I hope this was helpful.


- John

  
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soeren
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Post edited 1 month ago by soeren.
     
Sep 04, 2018 23:37 |  #6

I like my tripod to enable as low a camera position as possible. So will the leg assembly and head be in the way? Would you care to work with the camera upside down? Will you need to use the tripod for other stuff? What kind of low profile heads can you find..... and afford? will restrictions in movements of said heads be a huge problem?




  
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Oleg2010
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Post edited 1 month ago by Oleg2010. (2 edits in all)
     
Sep 05, 2018 13:33 |  #7

Hello,

Thanks a million!You’re so helpful!:love:

Temma wrote in post #18700452 (external link)
An intelligent recommendation requires more information:
  • What sort of macro photography do you intend to do? Indoor? Outdoor?
  • What level of magnification are you doing? 1:1? 2x? 4x? 10x?


Most of my macro photography is indoors in a living room with a "live" floor that makes it literally impossible to use a tripod physically separate from the subject stage. You can literally see the subject and camera move relative to each other when you shift from one foot to the other.

Outdoor:-) 1:1, 2х

John extremely useful :!: SUPER!!!!:-)

Wilt wrote in post #18700477 (external link)
There are tripods with center columns that tilt, tripods whose legs can spread super wide to get the head very low to the ground, tripods with center columns which invert in order to get super low to the ground.

There are 'arms' like this one which mount onto the head mount of the center column to allow the head to be mounted out to one side...

QUOTED IMAGE
QUOTED IMAGE

very interesting idea, thank you

soeren wrote in post #18700542 (external link)
I like my tripod to enable as low a camera position as possible. So will the leg assembly and head be in the way? Would you care to work with the camera upside down? Will you need to use the tripod for other stuff? What kind of low profile heads can you find..... and afford? will restrictions in movements of said heads be a huge problem?

Will you need to use the tripod for other stuff? -macro only
assembly and head be in the way? -YES ,Would you care to work with the camera upside down? - YES, What kind of low profile heads can you find..... and afford? - I'm afraid that's the next problem.;-)a




  
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Lester ­ Wareham
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Oct 11, 2018 05:35 |  #8

I have in the past used a benbo tripod in offset arm mode; it was rather wobbly, this is probably true of all offset arm solutions.

If it is low I use a bean bag.

For a tripod I would say carbon fibre or wood is better than aluminium as any vibration damps faster.

I seem to remember Toby got himself a low level wood tripod.

Head depends on weight of lens, smaller ball heads tend to creap with bigger lenses. Geared head is best control but expensive and heavy.


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GJim
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Oct 12, 2018 03:09 |  #9

I have sometimes used the Kirk WM-2 window mount, placed on the ground.
http://www.naturephoto​graphers.net/articles0​903/je0903-1.html (external link)


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Oleg2010
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Post edited 4 days ago by Oleg2010.
     
Oct 13, 2018 02:23 |  #10

Lester Wareham wrote in post #18726711 (external link)
I have in the past used a benbo tripod in offset arm mode; it was rather wobbly, this is probably true of all offset arm solutions.

If it is low I use a bean bag.

For a tripod I would say carbon fibre or wood is better than aluminium as any vibration damps faster.

I seem to remember Toby got himself a low level wood tripod.

Head depends on weight of lens, smaller ball heads tend to creap with bigger lenses. Geared head is best control but expensive and heavy.

Thanks, Lester!:-) I have not found Toby :oops: what is it ?

Not so important " Tilting column " ? ?




  
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Oleg2010
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Oct 13, 2018 02:24 |  #11

GJim wrote in post #18727271 (external link)
I have sometimes used the Kirk WM-2 window mount, placed on the ground.
http://www.naturephoto​graphers.net/articles0​903/je0903-1.html (external link)

Very interesting idea!Thanks!




  
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Lester ­ Wareham
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Oct 14, 2018 03:32 |  #12

Oleg2010 wrote in post #18727921 (external link)
Thanks, Lester!:-) I have not found Toby :oops: what is it ?

Not so important " Tilting column " ? ?

Sorry Toby is the real name of user racketman.

I did a search and I think the legs he was talking about are the Berlebach Min Tripod https://photography-on-the.net …showthread.php?​p=18347620


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Oct 14, 2018 05:26 |  #13

My experience: 2 knee pads and 1 elbow pad. Elbow pad optional, knee pads mandatory. Tripod, rarely any use for outdoor macro.


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Oct 14, 2018 05:33 |  #14

Result:

IMAGE: https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1138/3165538079_f31ca56bce_o.jpg

Stability provided by:
IMAGE: https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3123/3165537711_c3e9e5e7b4_o.jpg

Depending on magnification etc, most common method I used was hold the subject steady with my left hand and rest camera,chin, whatever on my left arm.
This means any body movement is at or close to synchronised. ie if I am slowly rocking forward, my arm, hand and camera are all moving the same.

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What a tripod for macro photography?
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