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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
Thread started 07 Oct 2018 (Sunday) 19:16
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Cardinal Canon 6D mark II cropped what percentage is this. to me seems fine

 
Jeff ­ USN ­ Photog ­ 72-76
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Oct 07, 2018 19:16 |  #1

I shot a cardinal in my side yard, it was about 25 feet away shot out my den window. The background was extremely distracting, at least to me.

I decided to crop it severely, but not being good at math I was wondering how much crop this is. when I divided the original size by the new cropped size I get 80% but it seems more than that, I have no clue.

Secondly the huge crop with the 6DII seems to have held up well.

the original size is 6240x4160
the cropped size 1204x1751

how do I determine what percent it was cropped?

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moose10101
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Oct 09, 2018 13:27 |  #2

I think you misplaced the decimal point. Only 8% of the original photo remains.




  
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Jeff ­ USN ­ Photog ­ 72-76
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Oct 09, 2018 17:40 |  #3

How do you calculate the % remaining, I have no idea...


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Post edited 13 days ago by TeamSpeed.
     
Oct 09, 2018 18:34 as a reply to  @ Jeff USN Photog 72-76's post |  #4

Multiply your crop dimension then divide by the product of the original dimension. That is what percentage of the original resolution you have left.


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Jeff ­ USN ­ Photog ­ 72-76
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Post edited 12 days ago by Jeff USN Photog 72-76.
     
Oct 10, 2018 05:25 |  #5

thank god for calculators, it make it alot faster

(1204*1751)/(6240*4160​) (in Mumps * is a times)

yup 8%

That to me is even more amazing that it is not all pixelated!


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Oct 10, 2018 15:01 as a reply to  @ Jeff USN Photog 72-76's post |  #6

You only get pixelation really when you resize an image after the fact to be more resolution than the original content. Then depending on the algorithm, you end up with blocks of pixels that emulate one pixel.


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Oct 10, 2018 16:31 |  #7

hmm, I know with my 80D and the old 70D when I cropped in really tight I would see the pixels, or at least little squares, I had never been able to crop in to 8% like this


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Post edited 12 days ago by TeamSpeed. (4 edits in all)
     
Oct 10, 2018 17:07 |  #8

Jeff USN Photog 72-76 wrote in post #18726400 (external link)
hmm, I know with my 80D and the old 70D when I cropped in really tight I would see the pixels, or at least little squares, I had never been able to crop in to 8% like this

Then you are zooming beyond 100%. That will happen beyond 100% and is more noticeable depending on your viewing medium. The other factor might be what file type you are viewing, like JPEG at a low quality. Compression is created by merging pixels that appear to be in the same range of values and merging them. You can get boxy looks from that effect as well.

Here is a 100% crop from the 7D2, and then a 300% increase in size.


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Oct 10, 2018 17:18 |  #9

If I save this last resized image at a very low JPEG quality, you get some strange artifacts. I assume that is some of what you are seeing. If you have a sample of something that at 100% shows staircasing/squarish pixel looks, I would love to take a look.


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Oct 11, 2018 05:55 |  #10

Teamspeed,
Forgive me for being ignorant, how do I determine how much of a picture to be cropped is 100% ?

I usually just crop to show what I want. A forum member helped me determine that I had cropped down to 8% (1204x1751)/(6240x4160​) = .08

would 100% crop be 6240 by 4160 cropped to 3120 by 2080 ? or what?


Current stable Canon 6D Mark II, 80D both with vertical grips, 10-20 EF-IS 35 f2 EF IS
18-135 EF IS 55-250 EF IS STM 100 EF "L" Macro IS 100-400 EF "L" IS ii, 70-200 EF L f/2.8 and more
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Oct 11, 2018 10:57 as a reply to  @ Jeff USN Photog 72-76's post |  #11

100% view into your image is a viewing thing, not a cropping thing. You can take your full resolution and view it at 100% without cropping. However it is very easy to either resize a crop of an image such that it is digitally zoomed, or view at greater than 100%.


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Oct 12, 2018 10:35 |  #12

100% crop is a 'cropping thing' when you post to forums.

Recently the forum has put a limit of 1600 pixels (for either dimension) for posting.

First image is 6720 pixels wide original 5D4, resized to 1600 pixels wide.
2nd image is a 100% crop. 1599 pixels wide crop taken from the original but not resized. Within the forum window it will be 1280 pixels wide, clicking on it will allow you to see it at 100%, 1599 pixels wide. So it's a 100% crop, full size crop, or probably most accurately, 'Actual size'.

If I opened the original 6720 wide image in Windows Photo Viewer and clicked on the 'Actual Size' button it would do the same thing. If I clicked on the magnifying Glass button and made it any bigger, it would start to pixelate and look blocky because it would be larger than actual size, or more than 100%.
Photoshop uses the same 'View Actual Size' terminology to do the same thing, as do many photo display and editing software.


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Cardinal Canon 6D mark II cropped what percentage is this. to me seems fine
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Bird Talk 
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