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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 07 Oct 2018 (Sunday) 22:51
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LED Lights

 
firme
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Oct 07, 2018 22:51 |  #1

I went online and have been searching the difference between led/strobe lights. Now I don't do much evening photography but would like to start. Once in a while indoor photography does happen and lighting varies from well lit to not so well lit. I came across various options online that caught my eye. https://www.youtube.co​m/watch?v=kwrGLPi6qb4 (external link) (external link)

I have also looked at other bigger set ups as well and can only guess there many different uses. This set up I would like to use for individual photo shoots. The camera mount I would like to use for video as I have a Canon 80D. I do own a Canon 580EX Speedlite. https://www.diyphotogr​aphy.net (external link) ‚Ķfor-portrait-photography/ (external link) Now I stumbled upon this site among the many other ones I read and from these pictures... with enough practice can one achieve the same/similar look at night? This set up I would like to use for individual photo shoots. Can you tell my skill level is very poor? Lol. Being that would want to do evening shoots, continuous lights are a better option?

I know any option will have its limitations... just looking to find a descent set up for my intended purposes. By the way, don't have a big budget which is why I provided the youtube which are cheap but I know I have to buy battery separate or any other set up such as second link provided.

Thanks for any help in advanced.




  
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Wilt
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Post edited over 1 year ago by Wilt.
     
Oct 08, 2018 18:17 |  #2

Back in the days of film about 1970-ish, generally one had electronic flash (portable or studio) or very hot incandescent lights.
The problem back then were that hot lights were HOT, and for the person being photographed the lights were VERY BRIGHT in order to provide sufficient illumination for the relatively slow film emulsions usually used (ISO 100 to 400)

Fast forward and our alternatives now are
electronic flash (portable or studio) or cool lights (most folk don't even think about hot lights any more)

Let's discuss, but break down the grouping even more


  1. electronic flash, portable
  2. electronic flash, studio
  3. CFL cool lights
  4. LED cool lights


Alternatives 3 and 4 suffer from the BRIGHTNESS issue of incandescent lights if you try for apertures like those with studio flash/portable flash, but now you can make the lights less squinty to the subject by upping the ISO setting of the digital camera! Gone is the immense production of heat from incandescent. But you do have the issue of subject motion due to slow enough shutter speeds for the lower intensity of LED/CFL/hotlights.

If subject motion is of concern to you, that brings you to #1 or #2, electronic flash. Inherently brief flash duration, bright enough to shoot even without slow shutter speed. But the portable flash fails to LET YOU SEE the resulting illumination and shadows unless you take some photos! Studio flash units with built in 'modelling lights' let you see immediately, reducing your setup time and wasted shots (not so much benefit from a cost savings since digital shot 'is free') and making for a much less unpleasant experience for a portrait sitter!

If you UNDERSTAND what is happening with ambient room light, it should be possible to mimic almost anything with artificial lighting...look at what movie and TV shows depict, indoor and outdoor scenes often shot in a studio!

You need to give me OK to edit your image and repost! Keep POTN alive and well with member support https://photography-on-the.net/forum/donate.p​hp
Canon dSLR system, Olympus OM 35mm system, Bronica ETRSi 645 system, Horseman LS 4x5 system, Metz flashes, Dynalite studio lighting, and too many accessories to mention

  
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firme
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Location: East Chicago, IN
     
Oct 10, 2018 08:15 |  #3

Thank you for the help. Does help me in trying to determine what will help more. I do understand that perhaps one set up is not a multipurpose use.




  
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