Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
Thread started 09 Oct 2018 (Tuesday) 10:36
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Timelapse of the Milky Way, Mars, Pleiades, Orion Complex, Sirius, etc from Oct 6th 2018

 
MalVeauX
"Looks rough and well used"
Avatar
12,865 posts
Gallery: 1283 photos
Best ofs: 4
Likes: 8683
Joined Feb 2013
Location: Florida
Post edited 13 days ago by MalVeauX. (5 edits in all)
     
Oct 09, 2018 10:36 |  #1

Heya,

I made an all-weather box that can sit out at my observatory and do captures for hours safely in the weather using a simple USB camera and a laptop.

Oct 6th was close enough to the new moon (no moon in the sky) that I could get a full night of clear sky and no bright objects so that I could get 9 hours of sky time to animate. I live in a green zone, which is a pretty dark sky zone with minimal light pollution so I can get a lot more out of the exposures without having to do any fancy processing. I captured a frame every 60 seconds for 9.25 hours and the playback is at 15 FPS reducing it to 37 seconds. It takes you from dusk to dawn with the core of the galaxy, Mars, several globs & clusters, Pleiades, Orion Complex, Sirius, etc.

(Click the link to go to my Flickr to playback the AVI, it's 37 seconds):

https://flic.kr/p/2bSy​hmF (external link)

Setup:

DIY weather box with an ZWO ASI224MC camera and 2.1mm wide angle lens


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Very best,

My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
andicus
Member
234 posts
Likes: 93
Joined Aug 2009
     
Oct 09, 2018 12:48 |  #2

Very cool, Martin!

I'm a little confused, though, about your camera/lens attachment. Where do you find a 2.1mm lens, and how do you attach it to the camera as well as focus?




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
MalVeauX
THREAD ­ STARTER
"Looks rough and well used"
Avatar
12,865 posts
Gallery: 1283 photos
Best ofs: 4
Likes: 8683
Joined Feb 2013
Location: Florida
Post edited 13 days ago by MalVeauX.
     
Oct 09, 2018 13:01 |  #3

Heya,

The ASI224MC has a standard threading (M42) for CCTV and standard optical systems, telescope systems, etc. They come with wide angle lenses like this and you can find them for sale. The 2.1mm lens came with this particular camera. But you can find them, CCTV lenses with M42 threading for pretty cheap. It focuses by turning the barrel while viewing live via a laptop or other device (it connects over USB). It's super easy since it's ultrawide (150 degree) angle and is focused to infinity. Think of it like a fancy CMOS web cam with lenses. I focused it once and leave it there (it's at infinity at this wide of an angle).

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
andicus
Member
234 posts
Likes: 93
Joined Aug 2009
     
Oct 09, 2018 14:04 |  #4

Ah, that makes sense. I didn't realize the they came with a lens.

I picked up a Neximage Burst a few years ago. It's been somewhat disappointing.

The ASI224MC looks like a decent planetary camera, based on some images I've seen, and the 2.1 lens is a nice bonus.

Thanks!




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
monty28428
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
10,084 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 232
Joined Jul 2007
Location: Carolina Beach
     
Oct 10, 2018 21:26 |  #5

I just want to put up a tent and hang out in your backyard for a year or two :-)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Noitca
Senior Member
517 posts
Gallery: 64 photos
Likes: 256
Joined Feb 2011
Location: Acworth, GA
     
Oct 12, 2018 06:00 |  #6

Awesome!


T1i with 18-55, 55-250, 50 1.8

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kezug
Senior Member
711 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 79
Joined Mar 2010
Location: N.W. Indiana
     
Oct 12, 2018 07:37 |  #7

This is cool and looks very unique! Congrats. How do you keep it from the affects of temperature changes such as lens fogging up or the dome fogging up. How do you keep it from overheating?


Camera's: 70D, G12 | Len's: 18-135mm IS STM, 55-250mm IS STM, 50mm f/1.8 II | Photos:flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
MalVeauX
THREAD ­ STARTER
"Looks rough and well used"
Avatar
12,865 posts
Gallery: 1283 photos
Best ofs: 4
Likes: 8683
Joined Feb 2013
Location: Florida
     
Oct 12, 2018 10:59 |  #8

It has a heat strip inside the box to keep it warm. Warm air radiates out of it, to ambient, so it's passively cooled. It's always warmer than ambient, therefore, no dew can form by design.

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
kezug
Senior Member
711 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 79
Joined Mar 2010
Location: N.W. Indiana
     
Oct 12, 2018 16:39 |  #9

MalVeauX wrote in post #18727504 (external link)
It has a heat strip inside the box to keep it warm. Warm air radiates out of it, to ambient, so it's passively cooled. It's always warmer than ambient, therefore, no dew can form by design.

Very best,

Thanks! Has NASA tapped you yet for their deepspace projects..I mean who needs Hubble when we have MalVeauX!


Camera's: 70D, G12 | Len's: 18-135mm IS STM, 55-250mm IS STM, 50mm f/1.8 II | Photos:flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
MalVeauX
THREAD ­ STARTER
"Looks rough and well used"
Avatar
12,865 posts
Gallery: 1283 photos
Best ofs: 4
Likes: 8683
Joined Feb 2013
Location: Florida
     
Oct 12, 2018 20:02 |  #10

The funny thing about Hubble and other telescopes, is that there's more data than people can even comb through, so really it's more significant with big data' if you can code and write software to analyze large blobs of data to result in patterns, or meaning basically. It's weird. I just like to see stuff and take pictures more. :)

Very best,


My Flickr (external link) :: My Astrobin (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

266 views & 8 likes for this thread
Timelapse of the Milky Way, Mars, Pleiades, Orion Complex, Sirius, etc from Oct 6th 2018
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Astronomy & Celestial 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is jshulerphotovideo
732 guests, 380 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.