Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Community Talk, Chatter & Official Stuff Member Activities 
Thread started 08 May 2006 (Monday) 18:28
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Where's Nifty?! #2

 
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 11:52 |  #11971

LOL. Thanks guys!!

Here's another daily dose of Rijksmuseum. :lol:

I posted shots of the model of a ship. The Netherlands once were a force to reckon with. We dominated the seas, as the phrase goes. And of course we had our fair share of wars that were often taken to sea. No wonder our art reflects that. I have always loved the paintings of ships, seas, battles. Here are a few that I happen to like very much.

The Battle of Terheide
Jan Abrahamsz Beerstraten (1622-1666)
oil on canvas, 1653-1666

Between 1652 and 1674, three naval wars were fought with England - the so-called Anglo-Dutch Wars. This painting represents the Battle of Terheide on 10 August 1653. In the centre is the largest vessel in the Dutch fleet, the Brederode, commanded by Admiral Maerten Harpertsz Tromp. It is firing its cannons at an English ship. The Dutch Republic won the battle but lost its commander Tromp, who was fatally wounded.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


The Battle of Livorno (Leghorn)
Willem van de Velde I (1611-1693)
ink on canvas, c. 1659

In 1653 the English ship the Samson went up in flames off the coast of Italy after an encounter with Cornelis Tromp’s warship the Halve Maan. Van de Velde represented both vessels at the centre of this pen painting. Tromp commissioned the picture to honour and glorify himself. The work is still in its original frame with the Tromp family coat of arms.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:00 |  #11972

I didn't get all of the frame well, in the frame. Unfortunately. And then this guy would not move! Anyway, just to give you an idea of the old, original frame...


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Apart from sea battles and heroics, the Netherlands is a country of water. More than half of the country lives well below sea level and the water is as much an enemy as it is a friend. No wonder then that the sea is depicted often by the old Dutch masters.

Arrival of the Boats
Jacob Maris (1837-1899)
oil on canvas, 1884

Waiting for the catch was a daily event on the beach at Schevingen. Everyone in the village, young and old, came out to pilot the boats to shore, to haul them up onto the beach by horse, and to snap up the freshly caught fish. The format and composition that Maris chose for this painting draws us into the scene; we seem to be queueing up, as it were.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:05 |  #11973

Two more very Dutch paintings and then on to other things.

Fishing Pinks in Breaking Waves
Hendrik Willem Mesdag (1831-1915)
oil on canvas, c. 1875-1885

Mesdag was fascinated by the sea, fishermen and their fishing ‘pinks’. These vessels had a flat bottom that allowed them to be hauled up onto the beach. Fishing Pinks in Breaking Waves depicts the moment when the new catch is being distributed. with its horizontal format and rugged brushwork, Mesdag transformed an everyday scene into a monumental composition. The artist generally made preliminary studies on the spot in Scheveningen but executed his paintings in the studio.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


By the way, Mesdag also painted this huge panorama known here as "Panorama Mesdag". The panorama is a cylindrical painting (also known as a Cyclorama) more than 14 metres high and about 40 metres in diameter (120 metres in circumference). From an observation gallery in the centre of the room the cylindrical perspective creates the illusion that the viewer is on a high sand dune overlooking the sea, beaches and village of Scheveningen in the late 19th century. It's quite a spectacle.

And then a very Dutch scene.

The Windmill at Wijk bij Duurstede
Jacob Isaacksz van Ruisdael (c. 1628-1682)
oil on canvas, c. 1668-1670

The windmill rises up majestically, defying the dark rain clouds and overshadowing the castle and the church of Wijk bij Duurstede. The River Lek flows in the foreground. This painting is world famous, and rightly so. In this impressive composition, Ruisdael united all the typical Dutch elements - the low-lying land, the water and the expansive sky - manipulating them to converge on the equally characteristic Dutch windmill.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:08 |  #11974

Examples of what the wealthy had in their homes...

Cabinet
Augsburg, c. 1660-1670
fittings: Johann Spitzmacher and others
various woods, veneered with ivory, ebony, letterwood, olive wood and rosewood, inlaid with lapis lazuli, pietro duro panels and Lydian stone; fittings: silver gilt, gilt copper

From the 16th century, Augsburg was a centre of production for luxurious cabinets, which were exported throughout Europe. The outside of this showpiece combines extremely rare and precious materials. Mosaic panels of various kinds of hardstones (pietre dure) were applied onto a background of ivory, between columns of semi-precious stones. The panels were made in the grand-ducal workshop in Florence.

There are also several bacchanals, a ceremonial tankard, a seashell boat with infant Sea Nymphs and so on.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


A close-up of the cabinet.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:11 |  #11975

Cabinet
attributed to André-Charles Boulle (1642-1732)
Paris, c. 1670-1675
oak, veneered with various woods, copper, pewter, tortoiseshell, horn and lapis lazuli; mounts: gilt-bronze

This may be the earliest-known masterpiece by Boulle, the most celebrated cabinetmaker of his time. Boulle perfected the technique of floral marquetry in various woods.
The gilt-bronze armorial trophy above the middle door originally contained a portrait of Louis XIV. It was replaced with a likeness of King George I of England (1660-1727).

It's like Joayne said earlier, incredible that these things were actually used by real people. Wealthy people, obviously, but still...


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Mantel clock (pendule)

porcelain: Sèvres
painted decoration: Charles Nicolas Dodin (1734-1803)
movement: Louis Montjoye
Paris, c. 1782
gilt bronze, enamel, painted and gilded soft-paste porcelain

In 1782 Grand Duke Paul of Russia, the later Tsar Paul I, and his consort, Maria Feodorovna, bought this expensive showpiece from the Parisian dealer (marchand-mercier) Dominique Daguerre. With its combination of splendidly worked gilt-bronze (ormolu) and Sèvres porcelain, this clock is a spectacular demonstration of the unrivalled quality of Parisian craftsmanship.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:16 |  #11976

European court art

In the late Rococo period - the years after 1750 - art objects were often decorated with specific imagery rather than playful ornamentation. entire paintings were copied in marquetry on furniture, in enamel on gold snuffboxes or in the painted decoration on porcelain vases. Precision was preferred to fantasy.

This tendency was reinforced by Neoclassicism, which - after conquering Paris and London - spread to all other European centres of production. Revived interest in Classical antiquity stimulated the demand for art with serious content. Architects, such as Piranesi in Rome, used Classical forms in the design of furniture and other elements for interiors. One thing remained unchanged: the princely taste for luxurious materials, bright colours and virtuoso craftsmanship.

Here are some examples of this court art. A table full of cases, notebooks and lots of snuffboxes.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


I took several close-ups but most were blurry or with depth of field so narrow (because I had to shoot at f/1.8) that the pic is rubbish. Here are two items (one in the next post)from the table that came out fairly well.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:18 |  #11977

Look at how rich this thing is...


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Vases, plates, figurines...


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Post edited over 1 year ago by Levina de Ruijter.
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:21 |  #11978

Chocolate pot with a molinet
Ernest Cardeilhac, c. 1900
Designer: Lucien Bonvallet

silver (metal)

The firm of Ernest Cardeilhac produced an accessible form of Art Nouveau silver. The designs are characterized by a combination of motifs based on nature in a repetitive pattern, in this case stylized thistles. The molinet (stirring rod) was used to stir and make the cocoa frothy.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Here I failed to photograph the description plate... But the plates were by Theo Colenbrander (more in the next post) and since they are exhibited together and seem to be of the same design, I assume the vases are Colenbrander's too.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:30 |  #11979

Here's one of the three plates that were on display together with the vases (previous post). I tried to take multiple shots with different focus but that didn't work well and I couldn't get them fixed in Photoshop. Except one. It's far from perfect but at least it will give an idea of how beautiful these plates are.

So, just one of three plates by Theo Colenbrander.

Theo Colenbrander (1841-1930) was the star designer of the porcelain factory Rozenburg in the 80’s. His decorative plates distinguish themselves for the bold colours and almost abstract floral patterns. Sometimes the overall design is difficult to grasp at once, as they stylized landscape with Middle Eastern architectural motifs. Although Colenbrander’s designs didn’t sell well, they were highly esteemed in the art world.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:33 |  #11980

Remember how in the corridors there were these huge stained glass windows? Here's an example of stained glass on display in the museum.

Stained glass

Small stained-glass panels were used as colourful, narrative accents in large windows decorating houses and public buildings. Pigments were fused onto the glass by firing. Compositions were often designed by prominent artists. Some windows were signed, such as those by the painter Dirck Vellert, who was active in Amsterdam and Antwerp. His compositions depict mostly allegories or stories from antiquity.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.

A close up of one: The Flight into Egypt, workshop of Dirck Vellert (c. 1480-1547), after a print by Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528). Antwerp, c. 1535


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:34 |  #11981

The Rijksmuseum also has a large library. Two pics.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:36 |  #11982

Being in one of the corridors again, there was this very modern stained glass window...


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.

And looking up, the ceilings of the corridors were also worth looking at!


HOSTED PHOTO
please log in to view hosted photos in full size.


That's it for today. More tomorrow.

Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
joayne
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
12,494 posts
Gallery: 3 photos
Likes: 1405
Joined Feb 2005
Location: Stuck@Coachella
     
Mar 04, 2017 12:49 |  #11983

Fabulous tour Levina!!
That library is tremendous.. and it looks like a Calder mobile hanging in there. (any idea?)

This is becoming a morning ritual for me!! :love:


joayne Contribute to POTN | Where's Nifty?! #2 |Nifty Sign Up List| Worldwide Photo Week

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Levina ­ de ­ Ruijter
I'm a bloody goody two-shoes!
Avatar
17,721 posts
Gallery: 269 photos
Best ofs: 10
Likes: 5813
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Amsterdam, The Netherlands
     
Mar 04, 2017 13:03 as a reply to  @ joayne's post |  #11984

Thanks very much, Jo!!
It is becoming an evening ritual for me! :-P

And yes indeed, that is Calder's "Noir, Rouge, Bleu, 1968". Well spotted!


Levina
Please quote when responding to a post!!!
There is no such thing as ect. It's etc. (with period) from latin et cetera.
Colours are not complimentary but complementary.
My flickr (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Timphoto
Creme de la Curmudgeon
Avatar
8,727 posts
Gallery: 59 photos
Best ofs: 2
Likes: 1947
Joined Apr 2008
Location: Milo's Meadow - Bloom County
     
Mar 04, 2017 14:13 as a reply to  @ Levina de Ruijter's post |  #11985

Levina, thanks for the wonderful tour of the Rijksmuseum. It was a nice way to "revisit" the museum. I was there in 2015 and I recall how difficult it was to shoot some of the subjects there with all the reflections on the display cases. You've captured it very well!



Tim


  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,264,302 views & 4,840 likes for this thread
Where's Nifty?! #2
FORUMS Community Talk, Chatter & Official Stuff Member Activities 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is PhotosByLena
439 guests, 385 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 6430, that happened on Dec 03, 2017

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.