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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 31 May 2006 (Wednesday) 17:54
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TS-E 24mm. Shifting -vs- Photoshop Correction

 
Scuff
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May 31, 2006 17:54 |  #1

I have read many opinions from photographers stating that they could do without the 24mm TS-E lens, when they can correct converging verticals using the lens correction filter in Photoshop.

Well I thought I would see what the differences were.

All of the shots were taken with a Canon 1DSmkII and a Canon 24mm f2.5L lens. Manual exposure was used. All the images were shot at f8 and focussed using the hyperfocal distances marked on the lens. The original RAW files were examined closeley for evaluation. These resulting images have been processed for the web to give the best result. Re-sized to 72dpi 800 pixels wide. Saved as JPEGs in high quality.

This first shot is an image of Guildford Cathedral taken on a tripod in the late evening. The camera was pointed upwards so that the whole building could be fitted into the composition. There is very obvious convergence shown and I have no doubt that it would be rejected by my Photo Library.:cry:

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO


This next shot was taken from the same spot. The camera was levelled using a hot shoe spirit level. The Lens was shifted upwards until the whole building fitted within the composion. I did notice some CA and more softness in the image due to using the edges of the lens coverage when shifted.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO


The last shot in the series is an edited version of photo 1 above. The lens correction filter was used to bring the verticals more upright. I noticed that contrast was lost and softness introduced where the pixels had been compressed and stretched. The image was then cropped to give a regular rectangular frame.

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO


Here are my Observations.

1. The image is softer when the lens is shifted and exposure has to be compensated.
2. When edited in photoshop, the image is softer with less contrast and has to be cropped.
3. For small prints, Photoshop will give you a pretty good result.
4. If using photoshop, you must frame the shot to take into account later cropping after adjustment.
5. The lens, when shifted will give you sharper and more contrasty results than correcting in software.

So.... If you need large prints or have to fill the frame, then the 24mm TS-E will be the way to go. If you are producing small prints or work for the web, then correcting in photoshop will produce pleasing results.

Scuff
Canon EOS 1Dx II, M5, XF400: 16-35 f4Lis, 24-105, 70-200 f2.8Lis III, 70-300 f4/5.6Lis, Sigma 150-600 Sport, 600ex-RT (3x), ST-E3 RT.
My flickr page (external link)

  
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JMHPhotography
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May 31, 2006 20:25 |  #2

That was a nice test... but I'm of the mindset that doing anything optically will beat out doing it in software.


~John

(aka forkball)
Have a peek into my Gearbag. and My flickr (external link)
editing of my photos by permission only. Thanks

  
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MDJAK
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Dec 14, 2007 18:38 |  #3

Aww, too bad you took those examples down. I would have liked to have seen them.

mark




  
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gasrocks
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Location: Portage, Wisconsin USA
     
Dec 14, 2007 18:46 |  #4

NO contest, a good tilt/shift lens wins everytime.


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cosworth
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Dec 14, 2007 18:51 |  #5

x of the red.


people will always try to stop you doing the right thing if it is unconventional
Full frame and some primes.

  
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TS-E 24mm. Shifting -vs- Photoshop Correction
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