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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Critique Corner 
Thread started 08 Apr 2007 (Sunday) 20:00
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My Hand at HDR

 
3dog
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Apr 08, 2007 20:00 |  #1

After seeing the pictures done by HDR I had to learn more and try it. This is my first sunset using the technique. The first shot is what the camera metered. The top shot was a one second exposure @f4 and ISO 50 with my G3. I had the Auto Bracketing on with a two full steps between each shot. I took two more shots 4 stops above and below for a total of five shots for the HDR procedure. Constructive critisism appreciated. I like the results, but I'm biased. Thanks.


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MALI
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Apr 08, 2007 21:01 |  #2

Wow, that looks beautiful.


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JaGWiRE
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Apr 08, 2007 21:02 as a reply to  @ MALI's post |  #3

Nice result, but maybe straighten the horizon?


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3dog
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Apr 08, 2007 21:15 as a reply to  @ JaGWiRE's post |  #4

Sorry I should have noticed that earlier, Thanks


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Duder
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Apr 08, 2007 21:19 |  #5

the shadows look very blue, and the masking around the edges of the sky against the trees and roofs looks pretty bad. otherwise, not a bad attempt.


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eos_o_eos
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Apr 09, 2007 07:13 |  #6
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Duder wrote in post #3007958 (external link)
the shadows look very blue, and the masking around the edges of the sky against the trees and roofs looks pretty bad. otherwise, not a bad attempt.

Second that




  
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Robert_Lay
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Apr 09, 2007 07:21 |  #7

I think that you should be commended for the effort AND the results. The objective here was to master the HDR related procedures, and I think you have accomplished a lot with your experiments - especially in regard to learning the basic principles of dealing with HDR images.

Could you give us a reference to which procedures you were following - Merge to HDR, or some more manual procedure?


Bob
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MALI
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Apr 09, 2007 12:01 |  #8

Duder wrote in post #3007958 (external link)
.....the masking around the edges of the sky against the trees and roofs looks pretty bad. ....

Masking is used in HDR? Can you elaborate?

MALI


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Duder
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Apr 09, 2007 12:17 |  #9

MALI wrote in post #3010856 (external link)
Masking is used in HDR? Can you elaborate?

MALI

I'm not sure what you're asking. Producing an HDR from bracketed exposures, leaves you with a 32-bit file which is tone-mapped down to 16/8 bit. That tonemapped file, can then be processed like any other. In this case there is distinct evidence that the sky was masked, without feathered edges, and therefore left small gaps of the sky, along the edges of the roofs and trees, with lower luminosity and saturation.


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MagicallyDelicious
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Apr 09, 2007 12:18 |  #10

Great colours!

this is something I want to try!


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MALI
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Apr 09, 2007 12:55 |  #11

Duder wrote in post #3010930 (external link)
I'm not sure what you're asking. Producing an HDR from bracketed exposures, leaves you with a 32-bit file which is tone-mapped down to 16/8 bit. That tonemapped file, can then be processed like any other. In this case there is distinct evidence that the sky was masked, without feathered edges, and therefore left small gaps of the sky, along the edges of the roofs and trees, with lower luminosity and saturation.

I am new to this HDR thing; let me explain how I thought this worked. You take 3 exposure bracketed shots and combine them into one picture using CS2. That's it.

Masking makes me think more than what is described above is done to the picture, more of a manual manipulation where you use masks to cover particular parts of the picture so that you end up with the desired exposure in the right places.

I always thought the second way, if it is done like that at all, would not be called HDR but I dunno exposure correction using masks?

MALI


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Robert_Lay
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Apr 09, 2007 15:29 |  #12

MALI wrote in post #3011166 (external link)
I am new to this HDR thing; let me explain how I thought this worked. You take 3 exposure bracketed shots and combine them into one picture using CS2. That's it.
----

Dear MALI,
Thanks for your response that you are using PSCS2. I further assume that when you actually perform the HDR procedures, that you are using the tool called "Merge to HDR".
Be advised that in my experience, only 2 shots (no bracketing) will usually suffice. However, that presumes that your two shots are chosen very carefully - Hi!

If you have not yet read it, may I recommend my tutorial piece on the use of "Merge to HDR".
Step-by-step Tutorial on "Merge to HDR"
Now available at the following Web site:
http://www.zaffora.com​/W9DMK/UsingHDR.htm (external link)
or as a downloadable PDF:
http://www.zaffora.com​/W9DMK/UsingHDR.pdf (external link)

I would also deeply appreciate your comments (both + and -) on the tutorial. I would also suggest that three shots should be more than adequate - again, based on the presumption that the exposures in those 3 shots are well-chosen, and that is an important part of my tutorial - how to set up for the optimum exposures.

I cannot comment on the masking issues, other than to say that if you simply used "Merge to HDR" for your processing, then any artifacts may have been generated by the "Merge to HDR" tool, OR they may have been produced by the JPG compression. The more I see of JPG compression applied to higher resolution images, the more I realize how seriously JPG compression can damage your image. It might be worth it you post an image of around 1 Megabyte on some other host and just put a link to it here in order to see what your final product looks like with more moderate JPG compression.


Bob
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3dog
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Apr 09, 2007 16:32 |  #13

Thanks everyone for your remarks. My process comes from this website: http://www.naturescape​s.net/072006/rh0706_2.​htm#whatisHDR (external link)
I read it all. The exact procedure was 5 shots in Raw two steps apart in exposure. Three probably would have been enough. Process the Raw pictures in RawShooter Essentials, much better than the Canon bundled Raw Processor IMO and free too. Then brought the tiff files into Photomatix
http://www.hdrsoft.com​/ (external link)
played around with the tone mapping. Saved the HDR 16 Bit image and opened in PS7. There I corrected a few simple things. I should have worked on the windows..next time. Duder is mostly correct in that the sky was modified slightly. I did color burn of the sky color at 24 percent. Change the file to an 8 bit to save as jpg and posted. I am really thankful people took the time to look and comment. Thanks so much.




  
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Duder
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Apr 09, 2007 20:15 |  #14

MALI wrote in post #3011166 (external link)
I am new to this HDR thing; let me explain how I thought this worked. You take 3 exposure bracketed shots and combine them into one picture using CS2. That's it.

Masking makes me think more than what is described above is done to the picture, more of a manual manipulation where you use masks to cover particular parts of the picture so that you end up with the desired exposure in the right places.

I always thought the second way, if it is done like that at all, would not be called HDR but I dunno exposure correction using masks?

MALI

You're right on both counts, although the main reason for utilising bracketed expsoures for HDR is to capture a wider dynamic range than a single exposure can, therefore providing you with much better shadow and highlight detail.
The image that the HDR software spits out it is basically your new high quality 'digital negative' that will require post processing like any other image, such as contrast/saturation/le​vels adjustments etc. Infact adding contrast, whether local or global, is usually the main requirement for tonemapped HDR's, without destroying the highlight/shadow detail you've restored by using bracketed exposures in the first place.


Pete
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Robert_Lay
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Apr 09, 2007 21:27 |  #15

Sorry, I became confused and took up the dialog with MALI thinking he was the original poster. All I did was muddy the water.


Bob
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