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Thread started 21 May 2007 (Monday) 00:21
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How do you go abought getting a press pass

 
primoz
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May 28, 2007 00:54 as a reply to  @ post 3276088 |  #16

Well it depends Jim :) Reuters, Getty, AFP etc. are all doing exactly this. Also whole bunch of small(er) photo agencies are doing this, at least around here. But I agree there's "a bit" difference between Reuters and someone who decided to establish his own photo agency :)


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Croasdail
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May 28, 2007 01:05 |  #17

primoz wrote in post #3242258 (external link)
I was just talking yesterday with friend about this "equipment thing". People relate pro to 1d (now preferably mk3 and at least 2 of them), almost complete collection of L lenses etc. It's not really like this. If you are doing things for fun, money is not really limit. For hobby, you are ready to spend more, and it's good thing. Money should be there so you are able to have fun, not to be laying on bank account.
For pros things are different. This is just a job. Yes sometimes really nice one, but other times really shi**y one, just as every other job is. But when it comes to money it matters if you spend $5000 for lens or $500. In last case you have $4500 extra on the end of month. And let's face it... you don't always need $20k worth of equipment to get good enough photo. And watch out... I'm talking about good enough photos, not perfect photos. Point in being pro is that you have good enough photos that your clients are happy. It's not about having perfect photo, it's about making clients happy. So if you are able to do this with $500 lens, why to bother spending $5000 just to look cool. And once standing on sideline noone bothers with looking cool... well at least I, and those guys who I regularly meet on sidelines, don't.

I will add an amen to this one. You need to have the right tools for the job, but just as with any investment in equipment a company would make, over spending where there is no real ROI based on the additional expense. 90% of what I produce ends up reproduced on the web or in news print. My crankie old 1D does that job just fine. Am a great photographer ... heck no! But my stuff is good enough - which is a side issue for me for another day. I hate being just good enough. But at the end of the day, the customer is happy, so I should be too.

But to your initial question, like Liza said, work for the press then. There is a good reason why the average joe blow doesn't have the same access.... and it is rarely to keep them them from getting cool shots. Media work under silly timelines, and they absolutely need to get the shots - not just want to. Consideration is made so these people can get their jobs done... whether it be for a small local or for a wire agency. With that said, getting great shots from public areas should not be an issue. You just need to be more creative. The opportunities for shots are there, you just need to find them. And be willing to earn your stripes on smaller events first. They are often much more accomidating.


Mark
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Croasdail
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May 28, 2007 01:09 |  #18

primoz wrote in post #3278027 (external link)
Well it depends Jim :) Reuters, Getty, AFP etc. are all doing exactly this. Also whole bunch of small(er) photo agencies are doing this, at least around here. But I agree there's "a bit" difference between Reuters and someone who decided to establish his own photo agency :)

Exactly.... I do a ton of agency spec work. But it takes relationships to get in the door very often, which takes time to develop. But even then, the minimums for image size has slowly been creeping up where I will have to retire my old 1D this year.


Mark
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blackshadow
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May 28, 2007 21:14 |  #19

The best known and probably most successful music photographer in Australia shoots everything on old Nikon film cameras (F3s I think). He knows what he is doing and gets results and gets paid!
As has been said before in this thread professionals use the gear they need to deliver the results to their clients.


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solrain
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May 29, 2007 17:47 |  #20

themirage wrote in post #3275910 (external link)
What if I start a business where papers can purchase rights to my photos. I wouldn't be press but I sell my imagery to the media as a legit company. Do you think that would work as a means to getting a 'press' pass?

Ok...I am a freelance rock concert photographer and sometimes AP stringer. I am a full time working pro. Dealing with press passes was/is a daily thing for me.

You still need an affiliation with a media outlet to get a pass. You are going about this backwards. Target 5-6 magazines/newspapers that you would like to submit to. Make an appointment to show them your portfolio (Fed Ex it if you need to). Once they look at your work, ask them if they would like to send you out on occasional assignments on "spec." When and if they say yes, you will then spend time finding assignments and suggesting them. Once you suggest something they want, THEY will arrange the press pass for you.

After the assignment, you show them them work, they buy the shots and you wash, rinse and repeat day in and day out. Once you "get on" with 3 or 4 magazines you will find getting on with the rest of your target market comes easy, if you are very very good.

You can make a living at this. But you will spend an awful lot of time in the office. When I am working, I have someone suggesting assignments and dealing with the editors for me, so I am out shooting.

The worst thing you can do, is to try to represent yourself into getting a press pass. Go about it the right way, by stringing for legitimate media outlets.


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solrain
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May 29, 2007 17:53 |  #21

blackshadow wrote in post #3282713 (external link)
The best known and probably most successful music photographer in Australia shoots everything on old Nikon film cameras (F3s I think). He knows what he is doing and gets results and gets paid!
As has been said before in this thread professionals use the gear they need to deliver the results to their clients.

I intentionally shoot with only what I need to get the job done correctly. Equipment gets stolen and damaged in my field for me to be lugging around $14,000 worth of "impress" quality gear. All it takes is your gear to get stolen once, and you figuring out all you needed was a 30d and 50mm 1.8 to get the job done, and you'll learn.


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Geejay
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May 30, 2007 09:34 |  #22

Presumably there are times when less gear is desirable, as it doesn't always pay to 'look' like a pro? Lugging around a bunch of big white lens and a couple of 1Ds etc.. could be a bit obvious....


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neil_r
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May 30, 2007 09:44 |  #23

You may have more luck if you apply for Media Accreditation (Press Pass is not a generally accepted term and the use of it implies that you are not eligible for one)

Most events / venues have strict guidelines for issuing accreditation, you will normally see a line like "Accreditation is strictly reserved for members of the press i.e. print media, photo, radio, TV, film and news agencies - who fully meet media accreditation requirements." when you apply.


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solrain
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May 30, 2007 19:33 |  #24

Geejay wrote in post #3291170 (external link)
Presumably there are times when less gear is desirable, as it doesn't always pay to 'look' like a pro? Lugging around a bunch of big white lens and a couple of 1Ds etc.. could be a bit obvious....

My work is proof that I am a Pro. I don't need to "put on the Dog" to prove it. My concern is what my clients think, not the other photographers in the pit. Of course I don't go running into a Pro situation with a disposable camera. But people that over buy equipment to impress others are making a mistake. Buy exactly what you need to do your job, and do it correctly.

Your professional behavior counts more than your equipment when potential clients are hiring you. If you don't own a big white lens, and don't need it often, rent it. Some clients do have equipment requirements and if you are hired by them infrequently, again the rental house is your friend.

If you need 2 5D's or Marks and L glass on a weekly basis, by all means buy it. But don't lug a whale on the job if you won't be using it. Honestly very few people care. You really don't impress long timers with great equipment. I am more impressed by the photographer who throughly knows his or her equipment and knows how to expose, light and compose. Any idiot with a credit card can buy gear. Clients know that. Don't buy into the "gotta" have the best toys game. It's a fools game and a waste of money.


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solrain
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May 30, 2007 19:35 |  #25

Many of us on this side of the Pond still call it a press pass. We Americans can be a little slow to use proper English. :shock:

neil_r wrote in post #3291229 (external link)
You may have more luck if you apply for Media Accreditation (Press Pass is not a generally accepted term and the use of it implies that you are not eligible for one)

Most events / venues have strict guidelines for issuing accreditation, you will normally see a line like "Accreditation is strictly reserved for members of the press i.e. print media, photo, radio, TV, film and news agencies - who fully meet media accreditation requirements." when you apply.


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Geejay
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May 31, 2007 07:49 |  #26

solrain wrote in post #3293988 (external link)
My work is proof that I am a Pro. I don't need to "put on the Dog" to prove it. My concern is what my clients think, not the other photographers in the pit. Of course I don't go running into a Pro situation with a disposable camera. But people that over buy equipment to impress others are making a mistake. Buy exactly what you need to do your job, and do it correctly.

Your professional behavior counts more than your equipment when potential clients are hiring you. If you don't own a big white lens, and don't need it often, rent it. Some clients do have equipment requirements and if you are hired by them infrequently, again the rental house is your friend.

If you need 2 5D's or Marks and L glass on a weekly basis, by all means buy it. But don't lug a whale on the job if you won't be using it. Honestly very few people care. You really don't impress long timers with great equipment. I am more impressed by the photographer who throughly knows his or her equipment and knows how to expose, light and compose. Any idiot with a credit card can buy gear. Clients know that. Don't buy into the "gotta" have the best toys game. It's a fools game and a waste of money.

Where did that come from ?!

I was not commenting on your ability or behaviour as a pro photographer. Neither was I questioning your credentials. I was merely trying to build on the point, that having loads of gear is not an essential element of being a pro photographer or even a good photographer and that on occasions less is in fact more. But hey, whatever...

Ahhh... America and England, two countries divided by a common language (not to mention several thousand miles of water).. :)

Incidentally, if I've completely misinterpreted your response (and made an a**se of myself). Please accept my sincere apologies..

Cheers!


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neil_r
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May 31, 2007 08:53 |  #27

I read this differently, and I still do, from what I see you two guys are agreeing with each other :-)


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solrain
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May 31, 2007 18:08 |  #28

You gpt me all wrong. :) I wasn't using myself as an example or speaking about me personally. I was pointing out, that a pro is a pro because of their ability and not how they look holding some whale of a lens. :)

Geejay wrote in post #3296330 (external link)
Where did that come from ?!

I was not commenting on your ability or behaviour as a pro photographer. Neither was I questioning your credentials. I was merely trying to build on the point, that having loads of gear is not an essential element of being a pro photographer or even a good photographer and that on occasions less is in fact more. But hey, whatever...

Ahhh... America and England, two countries divided by a common language (not to mention several thousand miles of water).. :)

Incidentally, if I've completely misinterpreted your response (and made an a**se of myself). Please accept my sincere apologies..

Cheers!


If at first you don't succeed, destroy all evidence that you tried.

  
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Roger-Walker
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Jun 16, 2007 16:22 as a reply to  @ solrain's post |  #29

Just looking at Silverstone's policy (that available online):

To qualify for media accreditation you must fall into one of the following categories:
  • Working print journalist for publicly seen newspaper, magazine, news service or newsletter
  • Working broadcast journalist
  • Working website journalist
  • Working photographers
You do NOT qualify for media accreditation if you fall within one of the following categories:
  • Public relations and internal communications practitioners
  • Non-journalist staff of media outlets such as sales and advertising teams
  • Representative of fan websites
  • Representatives of marketing or advertising agencies
  • Team personnel

They then ask for:
Upload an example of published work
Upload letter of accreditation


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Jun 16, 2007 23:16 as a reply to  @ Roger-Walker's post |  #30

The difference between a professional and an amateur is one thing. ATTITUDE!


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How do you go abought getting a press pass
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