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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 16 Aug 2007 (Thursday) 12:10
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dahonu
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Aug 16, 2007 14:09 as a reply to  @ post 3739084 |  #16

I think the over all feel is that the 100-400 L IS is the way to go?. that is if I get one lens and getting the 24-105mm of course easy of handling and everything else.
would that be a good set-up. I think she would be happy either way. even with the 28-300. its something anyway. and its not like Canon made the 28-300 really crappy. sure it has a f/5.6 but creativity holds no bounds.




  
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20droger
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Aug 16, 2007 14:12 as a reply to  @ post 3739004 |  #17

You did not make an error with the 5D. It is an excellent camera and will serve her well.

As for the EF 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6L IS USM, it is an excellent lens. However, it has two drawbacks: it is big and white, and it is heavy.

It is 92mm (3.62") in diameter, and 184mm (7.24") long, unextended. Being very white, it shouts out "big, expensive lens and camera," and makes it more prone to theft than a smaller, black lens.

It weighs in at 1670g (3.68 lbs.) without hood, which is heavy for it's size. This is a lot of lens to be hanging around one's neck all day long, especially on a 5D. If you get your wife this lens, you should also get her a POTN padded neckstrap (or equivalent) to ease the carry burden.

My personal recommendation would be to get two lenses. For a primary lens, I recommend the EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM. While this is not an "L" lens, it is one of the best (optically) in its range. It is also much smaller and lighter than the 28-300, and it is black.

For her wildlife shooting, add a Kenko AF 1.4X Teleplus Pro 300 DG teleconverter. This will extend the reach of the 70-300mm to 98-420mm with virtually no loss of image quality. A Kenko AF 2.0X Teleplus Pro 300 DG teleconverter can also be added if you with to extend her reach even further, to 140-600mm. Be aware, though, that the 2× teleconverter does cause a loss of image quailty, minimal, but present. In both cases, be sure it is the Teleplus Pro 300 DG teleconverter, not the cheacher versions.

The Canon teleconverters do not work with the 70-300mm lens.

For the lower end, I recommend something like the EF 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM. This lens, too, is not an "L" lens, but is still very good. The overlap between the two lenses helps to avoid unnecessary swapping.

The other things I recommend are a good camera bag (I like Tamrac, but there are many good brands) with room for growth, and a good tripod and head. She will need the tripod if she plans on birding or any serious wildlife work. I have a Manfrotto 3021B Pro with a 488RC2 ball head, but again, there are many good ones out there.

If a tripod is not practical, especially for carry-on luggage, you might consider a monopod. They offer a significant increase in stability without being so heavy and bulky.

Hope this helps.

Roger




  
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Richard_Miami
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Aug 16, 2007 14:19 as a reply to  @ post 3738633 |  #18

One additional thought - if she was an A-1 user, she is used to 35mm work - which translates to the 5D at full frame and not to the 1.6 crop cameras. She will know how a400mm looks through the viewfinder and how close she needs to get to her subjects.

She would have some re-learning to do with the crops. Not a very compelling factor, just thought I would bring it up.


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dahonu
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Aug 16, 2007 14:23 as a reply to  @ post 3739062 |  #19

I have a quick question.. other than the obvious extra 400mm on the 100-400 its has an f/4.5-5.6 were as the 28-300mm has f/3.5-5.6.
is the 100-400 lighter ? prob not by much. or os it that the 100-400 is just that much more clear sharper and crisp then the 28-300.
am i missing something?
hope this made sence LOL :)
thanks for your time and honest opinion




  
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wimg
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Aug 16, 2007 14:40 |  #20

dahonu wrote in post #3739269 (external link)
I have a quick question.. other than the obvious extra 400mm on the 100-400 its has an f/4.5-5.6 were as the 28-300mm has f/3.5-5.6.
is the 100-400 lighter ? prob not by much. or os it that the 100-400 is just that much more clear sharper and crisp then the 28-300.
am i missing something?
hope this made sence LOL :)
thanks for your time and honest opinion

It is a little lighter, at about 3 pounds, but it is actually balanced very well, you always support it at the right point for weight and balance, hence is easy to handhold, and for a zoom in its range and aperture, there isn't anything that can beat it. Fast USM, IS, sharp, and one of my favourites: shift zoom, which can be combined with manual focusing if so required, because of the placement of the focus and zoom rings, hence very fast at zooming and/or manual focusing, if so required.

The 28-300 is not a bad lens, but it is a compromise, extremely heavy, and less easy to handle. You don't always want the weight of it on a body, IMO. It is easier to have the 24-105 for general shooting, and a separate lens for nature and wildlife. The 24-105 has a very, very nice reach, actually, on a FF camera, from good wide angle (more so than the 28-300), great for landscapes to indoor shots and architecture, to a length that is great for all kinds of short/medium tele shots, i.e., portraits, slightly compressed landscapes, candid shots, architectural details.

And the 100-400 starts where the 24-105 stops. Both have IS, which is another plus. It makes the 100-400 truly handholdable, and adds a 3 stop tripod for those museum and church shots, or when dusk starts setting in.

If you consider te 100-400 too large, you could also go for the 70-300 IS, or the 70-300 DO IS, maybe with Kenk converter.

Kind regards, Wim


EOS R & EOS 5 (analog) with a gaggle of primes & 3 zooms, OM-D E-M1 Mk II & Pen-F with 10 primes, 6 zooms, 3 Metabones adapters/speedboosters​, and an accessory plague

  
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Richard_Miami
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Aug 16, 2007 15:29 as a reply to  @ post 3738633 |  #21

I agree with Wim. I use the 100-400 for wildlife (I wish I had longer lenses, but only in addition to the 100-400. not in place of it). I use the 24-105 for urban walkaround purposes. I also own a 70-200 (there are four different flavors of that one) to put on when I am not really sure what I am going to face - it is a great photojournalism lens for that reason.

Be careful with us POTNers..especially in the lens forum... this could seriously hurt your wallet.. ;)


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amfoto1
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Aug 16, 2007 17:58 |  #22

Hi,

I think your gift is tremendously thoughtful and don't want to discourage you in any way. It can be overwhelming and confusing, and you are doing great even if you just get her started with a replacement for her film camera and a single lens.

Coming from a film camera, she may feel right at home with the full frame 5D.

However, I notice she didn't have any particularly wide lenses in her old kit, so she might be just as happy with a 30D, and as others have said, really appreciate what it does for a telephoto lens. (Note: The 1.6X crop sensor makes telephotos effectively more powerful, but at the cost of wideness with wide angle lenses.)

The 30D & 5D are very similar in size and even share a number of functions. Without their respective battery grips, they are a bit larger but I would guess not much heavier than the A1.

If she used an MA Motor Drive on her A1, it would have similar in weight to the 30D or 5D with their battery/vertical grips, although the film camera and it's motor are slightly smaller. Also, if she used it that way, the MA Motor Drive used on high speed gives 5 or 6 frames per second, similar to the 30D's high speed 5 fps. The 5D is a bit slower at 3 fps.

As to lenses, I agree with the suggestion for the 100-400 as a possible starting point. It would work superbly on either of the cameras. But, some people like to work with prime lenses (I note she had a zoom telephoto, but perhaps she always longed for something different). In fact, she may some day end up with a full frame 5D *and* a 1.6X crop sensor camera, so she can take best advantage of both. Presently, only Canon gives this option.

I don't think it's really necessary to cover every single mm of focal length from XX to XXX. So, I'd recommend the 24-70/2.8 over the 24-105. Shooting available light, the extra stop of speed will be appreciated, I imagine. I don't find I.S. particularly important at this focal length. The 24-70 gives superb image quality and has very close focusing capability (near macro). But, these are really just choices I might make, personally.

One thing I'd caution is, if at all possible, keep the option open for her to exchange any lenses, possibly even the camera, for others she finds more appealing. Photo equipment and particularly lenses are a very personal choice.

Other things she'll find handy for a transition to digital: extra Compactflash cards, extra batteries & charger, a sensor cleaning kit, perhaps a couple books about digital photography and/or the Magic Lantern Guide for the model of camera you get her. She might also really appreciate the latest Canon "Lens Work" book, since she is transitioning from the older FD lenses and will likely want to learn about the modern EF lineup in more detail.


Alan Myers (external link) "Walk softly and carry a big lens."
5DII, 7DII(x2), 7D(x2) & other cameras. 10-22mm, Tokina 12-24/4, 20/2.8, TS 24/3.5L, 24-70/2.8L, 28/1.8, 28-135 IS (x2), TS 45/2.8, 50/1.4, Tamron 60/2.0, 70-200/4L IS, 70-200/2.8 IS, 85/1.8, Tamron 90/2.5 Macro, 100/2.8 USM, 100-400L II, 135/2L, 180/3.5L, 300/4L IS (x2), 300/2.8L IS, 500/4L IS, EF 1.4X II, EF 2X II. Flashes, studio strobes & various access. - FLICKR (external link) - ZENFOLIO (external link)

  
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dahonu
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Aug 16, 2007 22:37 as a reply to  @ amfoto1's post |  #23

Thank you very much for all your insite and everyone else for that matter.
Very informative and I will look much more in depth to all the lens you have mentioned.
One thing people keep telling me is that with the 100-400 4-5.6 f stop is slow.
Do you find this to be true? say over the 3.5-5.6 range with the 28-300mm lens.




  
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cc10d
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Aug 16, 2007 23:41 |  #24

The 100-400 is going to be a sharper lens than the 28-300 is. and all the other listed reasons for avoiding the 28-300 besides. I believe that the 24-105 or 28-135 will be much easier to use in the regular walk around type work than the very large in comparison 28-300. The Canon 100-400 IS is the best zoom for walk about wildlife lens currently available. I use it much more than I do my 300f2.8 L with or without 1.4 or 2.0. The 300 is a bit short for wildllife and with multipliers it gets to be a tripod only show. the 300 is an excellent lens but is not as easy to use. (means you don't take it along on a walk.) So the zoom with IS gets the shots. a nice thing with Canon DSLR's is you can use higher ISO and still have excellent results, so you do not have to have a super fast lens. Thaat don't mean I don't llike them, just that one can do OK with a 5.6 lens. Please don't get the compromising superzoom, 28-300 ! a two lens approach is much nicer to use, with better results in image quality.


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lkrms
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Aug 17, 2007 00:06 |  #25

A lens that zooms all the way from wide to super-telephoto is going to deliver inferior results to a more purpose-built lens. It's unavoidable. And though I have no experience with the 28-300, I personally don't think such a lens deserves an L designation, even if it does better than its non-L and third-party equivalents. It's a compromise lens.

Yes, the 100-400 starts at f/4 rather than f/3.5, but let's not forget it's f/4 at 100mm, not 28mm. And yes, 100-400 is a compromise, but it's not as much of a compromise as 28-300 (hence the better results). And it's lighter too.

I think that a 24-105 or a 24-70 would pair beautifully with a 100-400 on a 5D.


Luke
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