Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 28 Feb 2008 (Thursday) 21:42
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Software and Routine for Backing Up Files to External Drives

 
JW22
Member
74 posts
Joined May 2006
Location: Calgary (Canada)
     
Mar 28, 2008 02:06 |  #16

Tony-S wrote in post #5207498 (external link)
You're going to run into trouble if your Time Machine drive is smaller than your working drive, unless you keep your working drive to under 350 or 400 gigs. Time Machine does incremental backups and in a week or two or four you'll run out of room on your TM drive and it'll tell you you have to delete things from your working drive for it to start again. But if you want to do it, here's how:

1. Connect your two drives and launch Disk Utility.

2. When the drives show up, click on one of them and initialize as an HFS+ volume with journaling enabled. Name it as you like for your working drive and initialize. Do the same for the other one and call it "TimeMachine" (with no space - just to be safe). You should now have two Mac volumes.

3. From the Apple in the upper left, choose System Preferences, Time Machine. Turn it on and select the TimeMachine drive as your disk.

4. Here's where it gets goofy (imo). Click on Options and you get a window for "Do not back up" (seems really awkward to me). If there's anything you don't want backed up (drives, folders, files, applications), click the '+' and then search for those items to add. Time Machine will skip them and not back them up. If you use Aperture, be certain that you add your Aperture Library to the Do Not Backup list because TM can corrupt it if it's open during an hourly backup. Click Done, quit System Preferences and you should be good to go.

The first time you start Time Machine should be right before you go to bed, because the first back up can take several hours. Our 500 gig drive required about 8 hours to back up under with a USB drive.

Sweet Thanks!


_______________
Jill

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tim
Light Bringer
Avatar
51,010 posts
Likes: 374
Joined Nov 2004
Location: Wellington, New Zealand
     
Mar 28, 2008 03:29 |  #17

The advantage of robocopy over xcopy is it only copies files that have been modified, which can save a lot of time with large psd and raw files.


Professional wedding photographer, solution architect and general technical guy with multiple Amazon Web Services certifications.
Read all my FAQs (wedding, printing, lighting, books, etc)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
neil_g
Senior Member
Avatar
708 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Jun 2005
Location: South, UK
     
Mar 28, 2008 03:38 |  #18

tim wrote in post #5208141 (external link)
The advantage of robocopy over xcopy is it only copies files that have been modified, which can save a lot of time with large psd and raw files.

thats what the /D switch is for..


Burp.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JW22
Member
74 posts
Joined May 2006
Location: Calgary (Canada)
     
Mar 28, 2008 10:58 |  #19

Tony-S wrote in post #5207498 (external link)
You're going to run into trouble if your Time Machine drive is smaller than your working drive, unless you keep your working drive to under 350 or 400 gigs. Time Machine does incremental backups and in a week or two or four you'll run out of room on your TM drive and it'll tell you you have to delete things from your working drive for it to start again. But if you want to do it, here's how:

1. Connect your two drives and launch Disk Utility.

2. When the drives show up, click on one of them and initialize as an HFS+ volume with journaling enabled. Name it as you like for your working drive and initialize. Do the same for the other one and call it "TimeMachine" (with no space - just to be safe). You should now have two Mac volumes.

3. From the Apple in the upper left, choose System Preferences, Time Machine. Turn it on and select the TimeMachine drive as your disk.

4. Here's where it gets goofy (imo). Click on Options and you get a window for "Do not back up" (seems really awkward to me). If there's anything you don't want backed up (drives, folders, files, applications), click the '+' and then search for those items to add. Time Machine will skip them and not back them up. If you use Aperture, be certain that you add your Aperture Library to the Do Not Backup list because TM can corrupt it if it's open during an hourly backup. Click Done, quit System Preferences and you should be good to go.

The first time you start Time Machine should be right before you go to bed, because the first back up can take several hours. Our 500 gig drive required about 8 hours to back up under with a USB drive.

I'm going to assume that if Aperture corrupts than so would Lightroom? Am I right? I am running Lightroom.


_______________
Jill

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Tony-S
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
9,908 posts
Likes: 206
Joined Jan 2006
Location: Fort Collins, Colorado, USA
     
Mar 28, 2008 11:59 |  #20

JW22 wrote in post #5209744 (external link)
I'm going to assume that if Aperture corrupts than so would Lightroom? Am I right? I am running Lightroom.

I have not seen this issue reported with Lightroom, only Aperture. Those of us who use Aperture and Time Machine need to use Aperture's Vault for backup storage (which is really a nice tool).


"Raw" is not an acronym, abbreviation, nor a proper noun; thus, it should not be in capital letters.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,666 views & 0 likes for this thread
Software and Routine for Backing Up Files to External Drives
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Anne D
1044 guests, 232 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.