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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 02 Mar 2008 (Sunday) 09:29
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Can we talk about Bryan Pedersons book for a second?

 
Brad999
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Mar 02, 2008 09:29 |  #1

oops typo...peterson

Hi, can somebody explain two things from this book and bring it down to my level.

In the aperture pages, he talks about storytelling pics. He mentions that on primes, you can set the distance. The only one I have is the 85mm 1.8. Does this have this distance setting on it and exactly how do you do it?

Also, he mentions when he shoots a pic with a lot of green trees, he changes it to -2/3 of a stop. Does he mean to go into exposure compensation or does he mean to keep changing settings until the meter shows it -2/3?

Thanks in advance.




  
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eddarr
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Mar 02, 2008 10:30 |  #2

There is a distance scale on the 85/1.8 in both feet and meters. You can use this to set the focus to the correct point into your scene. This also works when using hyperfocus distance settings. Although, the effectiveness of hyperfocus is debatable.

The camera uses 18% grey as the "normal" metering point. When you have a scene that is predominately lighter than or darker than 18% grey the camera will adjust the exposure to try and force the scene to be 18% grey. The camera will tend to overexpose dark scenes and underexpose light scenes. This is why you will generally have to underexpose a dark forest scene to get a correct exposure.

You can use exposure compensation or if shooting in M just adjust the exposure by -2/3 stops. This is a good example of why you should be shooting in M and understand how to use the histogram. You can remember all the rules you want. Or just put it in M and chimp the histogram.


Eric

  
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Brad999
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Mar 02, 2008 10:54 as a reply to  @ eddarr's post |  #3

Ok, so thanks. When I go to take a picture, do I set that foott setting at the distance to 1/3 of the way into the scene?

ie, if I have a foreground and a cabin at 100 feet and then mountains. Would I set that foot setting at 100 feet?

Thanks




  
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eddarr
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Mar 02, 2008 11:11 |  #4

I think the distance scale tops out at about 21ft. Anything beyond that you will be focused at infinity. If you are using a small aperture like f/22 you can focus at about 5' and just about everything will be in focus. You can read here (external link) about depth of field and hyperfocus.


Eric

  
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troyer16
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Mar 02, 2008 13:27 |  #5

Are you reading his "understanding exposure" book?


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Brad999
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Mar 02, 2008 13:38 as a reply to  @ troyer16's post |  #6

Ok, perfect, thanks.

Yes, I forgot to put what book I was referring to...lol.




  
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Can we talk about Bryan Pedersons book for a second?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
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