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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 23 Mar 2008 (Sunday) 13:45
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DIY Reflector Panel and Angled Reflector

 
SYS
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Mar 23, 2008 13:45 |  #1

Well, I got really bored while waiting for the rest of my lighting set up to be delivered, so I decided to use my restless energy on a couple of foamcore reflectors...

As for the full length reflector panel, I could have built a 4x8' "bookend," which is easier and simpler, but I opted for a panel for its multipurpose, as well as its modular, uses. After I built this, I found Robert's (TMR Design) old posting about the same project except much better than mine. So if anyone's interested in this project, take a look at his as well here:

https://photography-on-the.net …91552&highlight​=reflector

The similarities between his and mine are the material and its modularity and multifunctionality. The differences are that I used 1/2" PVC tubing (his is thicker, I think) and hung with a couple of rings through corner holes that are protected from wear and tear with 1/8" white fashion eyelets. All four corners have the eyelets in case I want to tie all four corners.


The panel can go taller or shorter by simply taking the couplers off on both legs and adjusting the height with whatever length tubes... I decided to hang (rather than attaching) the foamcore in order to be flexible, i.e., you can hang a black foamcore on the reverse side through the same rings, or take the whole thing off and use a fabric or whatever the situation calls for....


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This one's for filling the shadows from angled positions (chin shadow, etc.). I almost threw this music stand when it broke on my boys about a year ago, but something told me to keep it for some other possible use.... Well, I'm glad I didn't throw it away, as it's perfect for low angle reflector use. This music stand can be purchased new for less than $10 or get it for a couple of dollars at garage sales. Just make sure to get the one that controls the angle. This thing can angle to a horizontal position. I used a couple of self-adhesive velcro to connect the board and the music sheet support. Again, I didn't want it to be permanently fixed unit in case I want to use the thing for some other purposes....


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Mar 23, 2008 13:55 |  #2

Good job SooYoung. These DIY's are great because they're inexpensive, functional, and great for learning.


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SYS
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Mar 23, 2008 14:53 |  #3

TMR Design wrote in post #5174413 (external link)
Good job SooYoung. These DIY's are great because they're inexpensive, functional, and great for learning.

Thanks, Robert. I was just now in the process of making a background support for hanging both my black and white papers on top of each other, but it turns out I'm one PVC tube short... I miscalculated the measurement... :oops: Back to Lowe's tomorrow...



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Mar 24, 2008 09:11 |  #4

Well, my first ever home made, one-light studio shoot with the above reflectors. I do know that I messed it up not having a clue as to how to control the lighting...



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Mar 24, 2008 09:20 as a reply to  @ SYS's post |  #5

Hi SooYoung. I wouldn't say you messed up but as you probably know, it's hard to model the face correctly with stuffed animals and substitute subjects such as you've done.

You can, however experiment with use the reflectors to return light to select areas and you can also learn how to isolate the subject from the background and create background lighting.

Once you have a human subject you'll be able to see the highlights and shadows on the face, nose, neck and chin, and you'll be able to manipulate the light that returns.

You're off to a great start. Keep it going. :D


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SYS
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Mar 24, 2008 09:55 |  #6

TMR Design wrote in post #5179503 (external link)
Hi SooYoung. I wouldn't say you messed up but as you probably know, it's hard to model the face correctly with stuffed animals and substitute subjects such as you've done.

You can, however experiment with use the reflectors to return light to select areas and you can also learn how to isolate the subject from the background and create background lighting.

Once you have a human subject you'll be able to see the highlights and shadows on the face, nose, neck and chin, and you'll be able to manipulate the light that returns.

You're off to a great start. Keep it going. :D

Thanks, Robert. I just posted a new topic with my young son as the subject where I did play around with reflectors in different positions to see their effects. I'd appreciate if you'd offer some comments on those, as well.



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Mar 24, 2008 10:06 as a reply to  @ SYS's post |  #7

Link please?

EDIT: Never mind. I didn't realize you posted to this forum. I see it now.


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DIY Reflector Panel and Angled Reflector
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
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