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Thread started 09 Jun 2008 (Monday) 11:09
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Anyone keep a pencil eraser in their bags?

 
seekphotography
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Jun 09, 2008 11:09 |  #1

On my old camera I used to get a bunch of ERR99 popups all the time to the point where I was going to send it into Canon service to see what was wrong with it.

Before I did that though I went onto google and tried to find the root cause. ERR99 is really a general code so I couldn't find the exact cause but after reading a page about using a pencil eraser to gently clean the contacts of the camera/lens connection .. the ERR99 stopped!

Keeping a pencil in the bag is a good idea anyways but now it serves dual purpose. :D

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a camera , a few lenses, various accessories and never enough time.

  
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ben_r_
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Jun 09, 2008 12:51 |  #2

Huh. No I do not... I think Id be too worried about eraser shavings getting in my camera to do that to the contacts.


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seekphotography
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Jun 09, 2008 14:03 |  #3

Put the camera on a tripod or hold it upside down and VERY gently rub any oxidation off the contacts .. no reason for any shavings to get into the body unless you're careless!

Doesn't take much pressure from the eraser to get the stuff off :)


a camera , a few lenses, various accessories and never enough time.

  
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JC4
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Jun 09, 2008 14:06 as a reply to  @ seekphotography's post |  #4

The one time I had err-99 due to dirty contacts I was able to quickly clean them with a Zeis pre-moistened lens cloth. The problem never returned. I always have some of these in my bag, so no need for an eraser, and no possibility of shavings. But, that may have been due to oils on the contacts of my, at the time new, 17-40. Other dirty contact issues may not clean as easily.


John Caputo

  
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P51Mstg
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Jun 09, 2008 19:27 as a reply to  @ JC4's post |  #5

What's a PENCIL?

Mark H


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seekphotography
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Jun 09, 2008 19:42 |  #6

JC4 wrote in post #5690372 (external link)
The one time I had err-99 due to dirty contacts I was able to quickly clean them with a Zeis pre-moistened lens cloth. The problem never returned. I always have some of these in my bag, so no need for an eraser, and no possibility of shavings. But, that may have been due to oils on the contacts of my, at the time new, 17-40. Other dirty contact issues may not clean as easily.

does sound like a safer method .. will go out and pick up a pack. will still keep the gummy eraser in the bag as well!


a camera , a few lenses, various accessories and never enough time.

  
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SkipD
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Jun 09, 2008 20:06 |  #7

My recommendation (as a 37-year tech in the industrial controls business) is to NEVER use a standard pink eraser on gold-plated contacts. The abrasive nature of the eraser really tears up the surface of the gold pretty badly. Look at the result of using such an eraser on gold-plated contacts under a microscope and you will totally agree with me.

A far better solution is a lint-free cloth dampened with a little alcohol.

If the alcohol wipe is not enough, a little wipe with a clean white drafting eraser (MUCH less abrasive than pink erasers) may possibly be needed. The alcohol wipe is more than enough, though, in 99% of the cases I have ever seen.


Skip Douglas
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NZDoug
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Jun 09, 2008 20:14 |  #8

I buy pencil erasers in bulk.
They also are useful for wedging small products when the eraser is cut with an Exacto or surgical knife to custom wedge shapes, for propping and styling.


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Magic_Puzzle
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Jun 09, 2008 22:11 |  #9

What are pencils?? Silly goose, they were what photographers used to capture images before cameras were invented.




  
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hqqns
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Jun 24, 2010 02:37 |  #10

SkipD wrote in post #5692442 (external link)
My recommendation (as a 37-year tech in the industrial controls business) is to NEVER use a standard pink eraser on gold-plated contacts. The abrasive nature of the eraser really tears up the surface of the gold pretty badly. Look at the result of using such an eraser on gold-plated contacts under a microscope and you will totally agree with me.

A far better solution is a lint-free cloth dampened with a little alcohol.

If the alcohol wipe is not enough, a little wipe with a clean white drafting eraser (MUCH less abrasive than pink erasers) may possibly be needed. The alcohol wipe is more than enough, though, in 99% of the cases I have ever seen.

+1 -Rubbing whats left of the gold off will make it worse in the long run. Isoproyl Alcohol is best as it leaves NO residue.


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klr.b
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Jun 24, 2010 02:47 |  #11

hmm...old thread.

it's an old trick where you use the rubber eraser on the end of a pencil to rub off the white or green oxidation on metal (gold) contacts. essentially, it works. the problem is the rubber eraser is abrasive; so it's like taking sandpaper to the gold contacts. you'll clean the oxidation off, but you'll also leave permanent damage.


gordon
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2mnycars
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Jun 24, 2010 08:25 |  #12

Thanks SkipD and others.
The pencil eraser method was recommended to me (at the Nikon School) a long time ago. This was for battery and contact cleaning; not lens contacts. I'll stop!
The white drafting erasers are incredible. Ever get wax on plastic trim on your car? White Staedtler eraser gets rid of it with no work at all.
Those that don't remember pencils would have real trouble visualizing an electric eraser. Used to have one handy near by drafting bench...
DaveL


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ecub
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Jun 24, 2010 10:25 |  #13

I usually use an cotton ear swab, moistened with alcohol to clean contacts.


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David ­ Yi
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Jun 25, 2010 14:23 |  #14

For any issues with electrical contacts, it is best to get a purpose made cleaner/deoxidizer. Deoxit and the gold version works very, very well for intermittent contact issues. Spray a small amount to a q-tip and apply to contacts as needed. http://www.caig.com/ (external link)


Gear list: Canon 5D3, 24-105L, 100L macro, 70-200L 2.8 IS II, 580EXII; Gitzo GT1541T, Gitzo GM3551, Markins Q3T.

  
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Anyone keep a pencil eraser in their bags?
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