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Thread started 20 Jul 2008 (Sunday) 10:17
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White Balance Eyedropper in Lightroom?

 
nutsnbolts
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Jul 20, 2008 10:17 |  #1

I usually shoot with a whibal card to correct my white balance when imported and developing in LR, however, in the event that the scene is not the same as the whibal, I have to at times do it manually.

What do you guys usually try to target?

R: 70 G: 70 B: 70 ? or somewhere around that?

I have heard 60 to 65, I have heard, whatever is in the scene that is supposed to be white?

What is technically correct? I know that white balance can be subjective but really as a general rule, what is the right thing before going into the creative aspects of adjusting white balance.


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Victoria ­ Bampton
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Jul 20, 2008 11:06 |  #2

White (but not specular white) and light grey are best. That's why it's called White Balance. ;)

Because it's working in a linear colour space, there's a lot more detail to work with in the lighter greys, whereas PS does better with a mid grey.


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Jul 20, 2008 11:35 |  #3

Victoria Bampton wrote in post #5947238 (external link)
White (but not specular white) and light grey are best. That's why it's called White Balance. ;)

Because it's working in a linear colour space, there's a lot more detail to work with in the lighter greys, whereas PS does better with a mid grey.

Victoria, I understand that lol. My question was, what do you choose specifically when you use the eyedropper tool.

Do you shoot for 60-65 % or 70-75% grey in an image?


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Victoria ­ Bampton
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Jul 20, 2008 12:13 |  #4

Higher the better.


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Jul 20, 2008 13:43 as a reply to  @ Victoria Bampton's post |  #5

hmm anyone else there are drastic changes between 60 and 70 or 80 for that matter


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Jul 20, 2008 13:54 |  #6
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Doesn't matter what it is All the tool does it tell lightroom that the pixels you picked are supposed to be the same in R G and B values. Whether its 30% or 70% It wont changed.


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nutsnbolts
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Jul 20, 2008 18:26 |  #7

V8Rumble wrote in post #5947960 (external link)
Doesn't matter what it is All the tool does it tell lightroom that the pixels you picked are supposed to be the same in R G and B values. Whether its 30% or 70% It wont changed.

That doesn't make any sense at all...so you're saying if you put your eyedropper tool over 30% for RGB and or 70%, there are no difference???


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Jul 20, 2008 23:30 |  #8

You want a number? Head for something in the realms of 80-90 if you can. That's light grey.


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Jul 20, 2008 23:38 |  #9

Victoria Bampton wrote in post #5950926 (external link)
You want a number? Head for something in the realms of 80-90 if you can. That's light grey.

Thanks Victoria. I'm presuming you try to strive to get all 3 RGB 80-90?


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Jul 21, 2008 02:03 |  #10

Ok, hang on, let's take this back a level.

Select the eyedropper.

Float over the image, watching, if you wish to, the numbers in the toolbar (press T) or the numbers in the eyedropper loupe.

Head for a light colour that should be neutral grey - around the 80-90 mark on that toolbar. The numbers will not be equal. All you're looking for is the fact that it's light grey - and you don't really need numbers to tell you that.

TBH, I usually turn the loupe off (in the toolbar) - it's quite distracting!


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Jul 21, 2008 02:31 |  #11

You can white balance on anything that has an absence of color...

White, Grey, Black .. Doesn't matter.

So long as the values for R - G - B are equal.
255, 255, 255 is the same as 0, 0, 0 as regards WB...


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Victoria ­ Bampton
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Jul 21, 2008 02:57 |  #12

Quoting Andrew Rodney (external link):

Working on gray's in Lightroom and in Photoshop are quite different. The data in ACR/LR is encoded in a linear fashion for processing. Half of all the data is contained in the first stop of highlights. Then half the data in the stop next and so on. This is vastly different in what's called a gamma encoded processing as found in Photoshop. This is why we white balance, not gray balance in LR. By the time you get to "middle gray" in such an encoding, you're working with a lot less data and it becomes far less useful and necessary to be targeting this value of tones.


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Jul 21, 2008 04:08 |  #13

I just look for any spot on the picture where the three numbers are the same. work fine for me. then i just adjust it to my tastes afterwards.


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Jul 21, 2008 06:11 |  #14

howzitboy wrote in post #5951983 (external link)
I just look for any spot on the picture where the three numbers are the same.

If the three numbers are the same, it's allready neutral...
Victoria is right:

Victoria Bampton wrote in post #5951674 (external link)
Head for a light colour that should be neutral grey - around the 80-90 mark on that toolbar. The numbers will not be equal.


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Jul 21, 2008 06:54 |  #15

Wow talk about confusing. You're stating to shoot for 80-90 and then another is stating it doesn't matter as long as the numbers of RGB are equal...

So an RGB of 80-80-80 will be equal to 10-10-10?

Of course all 3 numbers won't be equal but shooting to have all three numbers relatively close to each other.


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White Balance Eyedropper in Lightroom?
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