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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 15 Sep 2008 (Monday) 16:30
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Shoot faster than your flash?

 
mdw
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Sep 15, 2008 16:30 |  #1

Hi,

I thought I read somewhere that it is possible to shoot faster than your flash... By doing this you could light the subject, but get a black backdrop. Did I imagine this, or can it be done?

I recently bought a Speedlite 430EX ll, so I'm still getting the hang of it... :o

Thanks in advance!


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krb
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Sep 15, 2008 16:36 |  #2

You're confusing two items here.

If you shoot too fast for the ambient light falling on the backdrop but use a flash on the subject then you'll see the backdrop while the underexposed background will be lost in shadow.

It is also possible to shoot too fast for the flash by using a shutter that is faster than the flash's synch speed. This does not create a dark background, this creates a partially lit subject. Using hi-speed synch on the flash will prevent this from occurring.


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mdw
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Sep 15, 2008 16:57 |  #3

The first I understand. The second however... :p

So, what's the best way then to ensure a well lit subject, and a dark background...? :oops:

Low light in the background, fast shutterspeed...


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Chandler.
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Sep 15, 2008 17:00 |  #4

Shoot at your flash sync speed, usually 1/200 s. This will let in very little ambient light and your flash will be the primary light source.


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Titus213
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Sep 15, 2008 18:33 |  #5

Flashes don't have sync speeds, cameras do.

Move your subject away from your background, move your flash close to your subject, shoot at max sync speed with your widest f-stop.


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NathanJK
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Sep 16, 2008 03:38 |  #6

Titus213 wrote in post #6312936 (external link)
Flashes don't have sync speeds, cameras do.

Move your subject away from your background, move your flash close to your subject, shoot at max sync speed with your widest f-stop.

This is definitely the trick, you need to massively overpower the ambient light to make a black background behind your subject. BUT, if you do...it gives you a studio like look in just about any place that has a solid color wall! I've used this outdoors to do waist up portraits before with a grey wall as a background at about 10am. The trick was just that the flash and umbrella was about 3 feet away from them on full power, they were about 20 feet away from the wall. If I remember right I was shooting at around 1/250th F11 ISO 100.


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Shoot faster than your flash?
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