Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment People 
Thread started 13 Oct 2008 (Monday) 18:48
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

How do you deal with comp vs focus points??

 
savone
Goldmember
Avatar
1,048 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Dec 2005
Location: New Jersey
     
Oct 13, 2008 18:48 |  #1

Ok I thought I would get some input here from you guys and girls. I often like to shoot at a low aperture which as we all know limits your focused areas (very shallow DOF). So I was just wondering how everyone here deals with composition vs focus points? Its not always possible to drop a focus point on someones eye(s) and still get the composition you want. So do you shoot with focus points on the eyes and crop in post? Or do you focus and then recompose the shot in camera (which often for me leads to a mis focus).

Anyway, here is an image where I came across this problem. Comments are more than welcome...

IMAGE NOT FOUND
IMAGE IS A REDIRECT OR MISSING!
HTTP response: 404 | MIME changed to 'text/html' | Byte size: ZERO




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
Shutter22
I'm very sensitive
Avatar
1,379 posts
Joined Oct 2005
Location: The Only Town in Pennsylvania, fools.
     
Oct 13, 2008 19:21 |  #2

Personally, I hate cropping in post, unless it's absolutely necessary.

I choose a focal point that's close, and recompose.


Danielle
http://flickr.com/phot​os/danielledeleon/ (external link)https://photography-on-the.net/forum/danielle​.dphoto.com

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tacoma200
Member
Avatar
203 posts
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Southern KY
     
Oct 13, 2008 22:05 |  #3

I use the center focus point to focus on the eyes (since it's the most accurate) then recompose for the shot. Sometimes focus can be lost while recomposing but this is the most popular technique I know of. I love to shoot wide open also so I know I'm going to get less keepers so I make sure to take more than one of each pose.


Relearning Portrait Photography
Canon 5D+Rebel 28-135 IS
Canon 85 1.8, Nifty Fifty, Tamron 90 macro
Emotional appeal then technical excellence
All feedback is meant to be helful not hurtful

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Zazoh
Goldmember
Avatar
1,129 posts
Joined Mar 2008
Location: MICO - Texas
     
Oct 13, 2008 22:09 |  #4

On the 5D, which you have, custom set the multidirection joystick to select focus points, then it only takes a twitch in either direction to change points, pushing down re-centers.


A Camera - A Lens -- Gear Doesn't Matter

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Rhinotherunt
Looking for a Rock
Avatar
7,129 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Jun 2006
Location: Jasper, AL
     
Oct 13, 2008 23:46 |  #5

Zazoh wrote in post #6491119 (external link)
On the 5D, which you have, custom set the multidirection joystick to select focus points, then it only takes a twitch in either direction to change points, pushing down re-centers.

Ditto^^

Plus use DOF Calc: http://www.dofmaster.c​om/dofjs.html (external link)


Ryan McGill
My Gearhttps://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=592450

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
tacoma200
Member
Avatar
203 posts
Joined Sep 2008
Location: Southern KY
     
Oct 14, 2008 00:24 |  #6

The eyes never seem to line up with the sensors, even with the joy stick so focus/recompose is my best bet. Glad others have had such luck but at 1.8 the sensor has to be directly on the eye, not close. Experiment a little.


Relearning Portrait Photography
Canon 5D+Rebel 28-135 IS
Canon 85 1.8, Nifty Fifty, Tamron 90 macro
Emotional appeal then technical excellence
All feedback is meant to be helful not hurtful

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
fubarhouse
Senior Member
Avatar
480 posts
Joined Jun 2008
Location: Canberra, Australia
     
Oct 14, 2008 03:07 |  #7

If you really took some time, you can use the 40D's live view and zoom in 10x, move to where the eyes are, get the model to stay terribly still and manually focus on the eyes. and then release the shutter.

Just noticed you've got a 5d, so thats not an option, I ususally focus on a point that is close to what I want in focus (using * function - not sure if that is on the 5D) and then release shutter. If not, focus near eyes, turn manual focus on and recompose. I'm sure there are many ways, but those are the ways I would go about it.


Canon 40D, 580EXII, BG-E2N, RS-80N3 (Remote), Velbon Vel-flo 5 PH 248 (Tripod), Velbon RUP-43 (Monopod), Hoya CP Filters
Canon EF 50mm F/1.4 USM Canon EFS 17-85/4.0-5.6 IS USM, Canon EF 28-300mm F/3.5-5.6 L IS USM, Canon EF 100-400mm F/4.5-5.6 L IS USM.
My Gear | My Website (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
S-S
frustrating simple something
Avatar
8,751 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Aug 2006
     
Oct 14, 2008 03:13 |  #8

focus-recompose, multiple shots if possible




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
James ­ P
Goldmember
Avatar
1,911 posts
Gallery: 5 photos
Likes: 241
Joined Aug 2008
Location: Chatham, Ontario, Canada
     
Oct 14, 2008 05:24 |  #9

I use the joystick to select the closest focus point to the eyes, then I recompose.


1Dx - 5DIII - 40D - Canon 24-70LII, 100L macro, 135L, 16-35L, 70-200 f4 and 100-400L lenses

- "Very good" is the enemy of "great." Sometimes we confuse the two.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
In2Photos
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
19,813 posts
Likes: 6
Joined Dec 2005
Location: Near Charlotte, NC.
     
Oct 14, 2008 07:59 |  #10

Shutter22 wrote in post #6490227 (external link)
Personally, I hate cropping in post, unless it's absolutely necessary.

I choose a focal point that's close, and recompose.

Same here when shooting for myself. But for paying customers cropping is a necessary "evil". It is not often that people only buy one size of your image. Often times you will have to work with 2 or 3 different aspect ratios in order to get the correct print sizes. So cropping is a must. In this case it is often best to shoot loose so you don't have to crop out important bits in the shot. This can affect your DOF, but it also may move the focal points closer to your desired location on your subject.


Mike, The Keeper of the Archive

Current Gear and Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
In2Photos
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
19,813 posts
Likes: 6
Joined Dec 2005
Location: Near Charlotte, NC.
     
Oct 14, 2008 10:16 as a reply to  @ In2Photos's post |  #11

Questions about the joystick have been moved to a new thread:

https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=585000


Mike, The Keeper of the Archive

Current Gear and Feedback

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bl4scott
Senior Member
Avatar
258 posts
Joined Jan 2008
     
Oct 14, 2008 10:19 |  #12

This is something that I too have questioned too. I love the 85 and shooting wide open. It seems that everyone has a different opinion to this. I read a great article about using a focus point and recomposing can be dangerous due to the shallow dof. It is a pain to keep moving the focus point to match up with the eyes but it seems to be the only way to get the most keepers.

Brian


5D MkII * 7D gripped * / Canon 85 1.8 / Canon 24-70 L / Canon 70-200 2.8 L / Sigma 30 1.4

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Gatorboy
Goldmember
Avatar
2,483 posts
Likes: 2
Joined May 2005
Location: Bel Air, MD
     
Oct 14, 2008 10:21 |  #13

savone wrote in post #6490062 (external link)
Its not always possible to drop a focus point on someones eye(s) and still get the composition you want.

Have you tried MANUAL focus?


Dave Hoffmann

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ben_r_
-POTN's Three legged Support-
Avatar
15,894 posts
Likes: 13
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
     
Oct 14, 2008 10:33 |  #14

Use the * button to AF, then just use the center AF point as your focusing point and re compose once you have what you want in focus. Thats how I do it.


[Gear List | Flickr (external link) | My Reviews] /|\ Tripod Leg Protection (external link) /|\
GIVE a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. TEACH a man to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
OL9245
Goldmember
Avatar
1,778 posts
Joined Dec 2005
Location: Montpellier France
     
Oct 14, 2008 11:13 |  #15

ben_r_ wrote in post #6493870 (external link)
Use the * button to AF, then just use the center AF point as your focusing point and re compose once you have what you want in focus. Thats how I do it.

That's what I do. Custum function #4 on the 5D if I remember well (not sure)


Gear list. Photoshop tips and tricks I've learned here at POTN.
English is not my native language. Once and then, I can make funny sentences :shock:
learn more about my avatar

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

1,770 views & 0 likes for this thread
How do you deal with comp vs focus points??
FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment People 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Roymoore
682 guests, 176 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.