Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 14 Nov 2008 (Friday) 22:15
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

What should I know about the Alaskan winter and my camera gear?

 
shomat
Senior Member
Avatar
730 posts
Joined Jan 2008
Post edited over 1 year ago by shomat.
     
Nov 14, 2008 22:15 |  #1

...




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
JuiceBox
Senior Member
Avatar
495 posts
Joined Oct 2008
Location: New Jersey
     
Nov 18, 2008 14:27 |  #2

I've never shot in extreme weather like this, but I'm going to imagine you'll need lots of extra batteries; cold wreaks absolute havoc with batteries. Keep your spares tucked nice and deep in your gear to keep them warm; they won't last long once you take them out and start using them.

Other than that, I really don't know of any effects cold weather has on camera gear. It only gets down to about 10*F at the most where I am, and an Alaskan winter is much, much harsher.


Nikon D50 -- Nikkor 24mm F/2.8 -- Nikkor 28-80mm F/3.3-5.6 -- Nikkor 135mm F/2.8 -- Sigma 70-300mm F/4-5.6https://photography-on-the.net …ww.flickr.com/j​uicebox889 Flickr (external link)

If I come off as rude, don't take it personally. I strongly believe in harsh criticism; sugar coating things does not help one improve.
Darker Qorners (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
shomat
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
730 posts
Joined Jan 2008
     
Nov 18, 2008 15:51 |  #3

Apparently it can get down to 20 below in Fairbanks.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
JuiceBox
Senior Member
Avatar
495 posts
Joined Oct 2008
Location: New Jersey
     
Nov 18, 2008 16:06 |  #4

Huh; I would think it would be much colder. I've spent nights in the wilderness in upstate NY and have it get -20*F. Weird.


Nikon D50 -- Nikkor 24mm F/2.8 -- Nikkor 28-80mm F/3.3-5.6 -- Nikkor 135mm F/2.8 -- Sigma 70-300mm F/4-5.6https://photography-on-the.net …ww.flickr.com/j​uicebox889 Flickr (external link)

If I come off as rude, don't take it personally. I strongly believe in harsh criticism; sugar coating things does not help one improve.
Darker Qorners (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bps
Cream of the Crop
7,607 posts
Likes: 405
Joined Mar 2007
Location: California
     
Nov 20, 2008 23:56 |  #5

JuiceBox wrote in post #6712427 (external link)
I've never shot in extreme weather like this, but I'm going to imagine you'll need lots of extra batteries; cold wreaks absolute havoc with batteries. Keep your spares tucked nice and deep in your gear to keep them warm; they won't last long once you take them out and start using them.

I second this. I would recommend having some spare batteries and keeping them against your body (via an inside pocket) while you are outside.

I know this is obvious, but you;ll want to protect the tips of your fingers....

Other than that, and keeping your gear in zip-lock bags when gong from cold-to-hot, you should be fine.

Bryan


My Gear List

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
eeeksNYC
Senior Member
Avatar
604 posts
Gallery: 1 photo
Likes: 3
Joined Jan 2008
Location: NYC/NJ
     
Nov 21, 2008 00:23 |  #6

another thing to keep in mind that with the extreme cold, plastics and such, become much more brittle and susceptible to shattering with sharp knocks.

A tip someone once told me is to purchase some of those hand warmer packets and stuff them in an inside pocket with your fully charged backup batteries, might help them to last a bit longer.

also, to help combat the condensation problem, the plastic bags that bps mentioned should help but also pack a bag of Damp Rid (a dessicant available at Home depot) or something similar in your camera bag.


eeeksNYC (my blog (external link), my flickr (external link))
zeiss ikon icarex 35s,5D MK1/ EF 28-70 f2.8L / Sigma 50mm f1.4 / Sunpak 383s / Cybersyncs / and a couple bags of other stuff....http://www.flickr.com/​photos/29075737@N02/ (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
keitaro
Senior Member
Avatar
605 posts
Joined Dec 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
     
Nov 22, 2008 13:18 |  #7

get some pocketwarmers, and keep your spare batteries with them. Also get a large ziplock bag to keep your camera in when transitioning between outdoors and indoors. This will avoid condensation building up.


My flickr (external link)
My Gear

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Blackey ­ Cole
Senior Member
480 posts
Likes: 21
Joined Feb 2007
Location: Alamogordo New Mexico
     
Dec 17, 2008 13:42 |  #8

Get yourself some of the hand warmers that stick so you can place them on your batteries to keep them alive in cold wx. Also do nothing for the first 1/2 hour you go out in the cold or in from it to allow your equipment to adjust and not be covered with condensation. and dress very warm.


Click Here and Join the POTN flickr Group Today! (external link)

Gear List

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
PBeeee
Senior Member
559 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Montana USA
     
Dec 17, 2008 22:47 |  #9

Keep your batteries close to your body. You'll be changing them out, put 'dead' ones in a warm spot and they may come back. Mine usually do. I have a little pocket sewn into the waistband of my thermal base layer, its where I keep mine. I've also 'revived' batteries by rubbing them on my nylon outer gear. I have gotten alot of shots out of dead batteries that way.
Your LCD is a LIQUID crystal display. It can freeze and that is big-O trouble. I know you're going to want to use a tripod for auroras but you need to put your camera under your coat to warm up if the temps are below zero. How often? Depends how cold. I would say if it is below zero, no more than 5 minutes. Use a quick release plate.
My 40d's shutter has stopped working twice this week in wind chills in the -30 to -40f range. As soon as it was warmed slightly, it came back. I'm not keeping my camera out from under my coat for more than 5-7 minutes at a time right now. And the post about plastics being more brittle is right on. Not a good idea to bang or drop a cold camera or lens.
The whole thing with bags only applies if you are going to a warm environment directly from the cold. I don't usually do that with my gear, I leave it in our shop, which is heated, very dry and not above 50f most of the time. After a bit, I bring it in the house. I also don't put it near the car heater on the way home. If I really can't wait for the pics, I just grab the card.
Once you and your gear are all back in a warm place and both warm, do your camera a favor. If it is not a humid environment, remove the battery and card and leave the doors open. This tip came from Canon, to allow any minute condensation to dry. I also always take time to clean my camera after I've abused it. Call it camera karma but I think babying it a little pays off, I take my gear out in pretty rugged stuff and until this week I had not had any issues before.




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Karl ­ Johnston
Cream of the Crop
9,334 posts
Likes: 3
Joined Jul 2008
     
Dec 23, 2008 01:53 |  #10
bannedPermanent ban

The cameras are more durable than that. I shoot all the time with my gear in -40 and below and never have half the problems people listed here.

Sure you can't stand outside for a whole night shooting, your batteries will only last about an hour before starting to give way and if you do a lot of handheld shooting i recommend some warm gloves.

Tripod is absolute necessity. A really good one. I'm just about to dump 700 $ on a really good 3way head and manfrotto myself; shop around, you can get a nice 055D for less than 100 $ (no head)

go here to see some northern lights done by a powershot;

on careful support you can get some really nice auroras;

http://flickr.com …/karljohnston/2​880671424/ (external link)
http://flickr.com …/karljohnston/2​785659485/ (external link)
http://flickr.com …/karljohnston/2​740243919/ (external link)

The 5D will have the larger sensor and be able to handle the noise better, but I don't recommend you go over iSO 800 with it when shooting. Also pack a nice wide angle.


Adventurous Photographer, Writer (external link) & Wedding Photographer (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Isshinharu
Member
72 posts
Joined Sep 2005
Location: Sunshine State
     
Dec 24, 2008 00:18 |  #11

If you go outside from a room temp environment to frigid air, keep in mind your glass may fog. I had this happen and it took a good 45 min or so for it to go away. Don't want to miss those shots!


20D | EF-S 17-85 f/4-5.6 IS USM | EF 50mm f/1.4 | EF 70-200 f/2.8L IS USM |580 EX-II | Manfrotto Monopod

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Steve ­ In ­ Kentucky
Senior Member
Avatar
390 posts
Joined Jan 2007
Location: Kentucky Lake
     
Dec 26, 2008 14:00 |  #12

Most have already given great tips so, all i have to add is I'M JEALOUS.


Rebel Xti/with grip
EF 17-40F4L
EF 70-200F4L
EF 50 f/1.4
EF 85 f/1.8

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

3,256 views & 0 likes for this thread
What should I know about the Alaskan winter and my camera gear?
FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Nick Lamendola
827 guests, 302 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.