Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon Accessories 
Thread started 13 Jan 2009 (Tuesday) 00:29
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Sekonic L-358 Light Meter

 
realitysays
Senior Member
Avatar
340 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Northern Beaches, Sydney, NSW
     
Jan 13, 2009 00:29 |  #1

I have a question regarding a light meter and in particular this light meter.

I have the chance to buy one for a good price, but i am just curious if i will use it to its full benefit. I have read this is quite an excellent light meter, but i still cannot find out if it will benefit me enough to buy it.

I mainly shoot landscapes,sports, some wildlife and a few portraits every now and then.

Will i be able to walk into a scene (lets say a seascape for instance) pull out my light meter, and it will tell me what my exposure should be in any conditions?

Or is this mainly for studio work and to use with flashes/strobes etc...

I would like it mainly for landscape work,sports so i can get a correct readout for exposure as this would help with workflow and time spent chimping.

Many thanks for your answers and sorry for the noob question!


2012 Cams Accredited Motorsport Photographer
Follow Me on Facebook! (external link)
www.flickr.com/photos/​koryleung/ (external link)
www.koryleungphotograp​hy.com.au (external link) - Motorsports & Automotive Photography

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
René ­ Damkot
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
39,856 posts
Likes: 8
Joined Feb 2005
Location: enschede, netherlands
     
Jan 13, 2009 03:53 |  #2

For landscapes, IMO a spot meter is more useful: You cannot always walk to the scene you want to photograph / meter.

The sekonic (I have one) is *very* useful when using flash, and when mixing flash with ambient. Wouldn't want to be without it.
But I've *never* used it for landscapes (nor think I ever will).

Have a look here (external link), might be more helpful.

Another link: Click (external link)


"I think the idea of art kills creativity" - Douglas Adams
Why Color Management.
Color Problems? Click here.
MySpace (external link)
Get Colormanaged (external link)
Twitter (external link)
PERSONAL MESSAGING REGARDING SELLING OR BUYING ITEMS WITH MEMBERS WHO HAVE NO POSTS IN FORUMS AND/OR WHO YOU DO NOT KNOW FROM FORUMS IS HEREBY DECLARED STRICTLY STUPID AND YOU WILL GET BURNED.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ben_r_
-POTN's Three legged Support-
Avatar
15,894 posts
Likes: 13
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
     
Jan 13, 2009 13:05 |  #3

Also keep in mind that there is a 1 degree spot meter attachment for this light meter that will give you spot metering capability. Its about $135 I think and can usually easily be found on ebay.


[Gear List | Flickr (external link) | My Reviews] /|\ Tripod Leg Protection (external link) /|\
GIVE a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. TEACH a man to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ironchef31
Senior Member
623 posts
Joined Apr 2007
Location: Vancouver
     
Jan 13, 2009 13:30 |  #4

Here is a quick tutorial on using a light meter
click (external link)


Ken
30D, 18-55mm, nifty 50, 17-55 F2.8 IS, 70-200 F2.8 IS

I tried to bounce my flash off the ceiling once. Left a mark on the ceiling and broke my flash.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
René ­ Damkot
Cream of the Crop
Avatar
39,856 posts
Likes: 8
Joined Feb 2005
Location: enschede, netherlands
     
Jan 13, 2009 13:35 |  #5

AFAIK the spot attachment is either 5 or 10 degrees.


"I think the idea of art kills creativity" - Douglas Adams
Why Color Management.
Color Problems? Click here.
MySpace (external link)
Get Colormanaged (external link)
Twitter (external link)
PERSONAL MESSAGING REGARDING SELLING OR BUYING ITEMS WITH MEMBERS WHO HAVE NO POSTS IN FORUMS AND/OR WHO YOU DO NOT KNOW FROM FORUMS IS HEREBY DECLARED STRICTLY STUPID AND YOU WILL GET BURNED.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
FlyingPhotog
Cream of the "Prop"
Avatar
57,560 posts
Likes: 160
Joined May 2007
Location: Probably Chasing Aircraft
     
Jan 13, 2009 13:38 |  #6

René Damkot wrote in post #7068165 (external link)
AFAIK the spot attachment is either 5 or 10 degrees.

There's a 1, a 5 and a 10 available...


Jay
Crosswind Images (external link)
Facebook Fan Page (external link)

"If you aren't getting extraordinary images from today's dSLRs, regardless of brand, it's not the camera!" - Bill Fortney, Nikon Corp.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
GSansoucie
Senior Member
Avatar
788 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Jul 2005
Location: Southern Maine
     
Jan 13, 2009 14:06 |  #7

FlyingPhotog wrote in post #7068191 (external link)
There's a 1, a 5 and a 10 available...

The OP has a 50D (with a spot meter). Is there a big difference between the in camera spot meter and the Sekonic?


-=Glen=-
Flickr Stream (external link)
Check out my 2010 PaD (external link)
http://www.pbase.com/g​sansoucie (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
FlyingPhotog
Cream of the "Prop"
Avatar
57,560 posts
Likes: 160
Joined May 2007
Location: Probably Chasing Aircraft
     
Jan 13, 2009 14:14 |  #8

GSansoucie wrote in post #7068407 (external link)
The OP has a 50D (with a spot meter). Is there a big difference between the in camera spot meter and the Sekonic?

IIRC, the xxD series spot meter is something like three to three and a half degrees, right?

It's close but one advantage I can see to using the one degree on the Sekonic is the fact that the meter can store and average the readings which would give you a truer picutre of the contrast ratio you're facing. Meter your highlights, meter your shadows, shoot at the resultant average apertue and you're going to be very, very close to all good (especially in RAW)

But, you could do it in your head as well using the camera meter I suppose.

Like Rene said, invaluable in studio but since you have one, why not take it out in the field too.

I only have the stock Lumigrid which I think is roughly a 50 degree FOV but I'll stick it up next to the lens, take a reading then I can eyeball whether or not I'm faced with a scene that's primarilly highlight-heavy or shadow-heavy. It just gives me a ballpark aperture with which to start.


Jay
Crosswind Images (external link)
Facebook Fan Page (external link)

"If you aren't getting extraordinary images from today's dSLRs, regardless of brand, it's not the camera!" - Bill Fortney, Nikon Corp.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
ben_r_
-POTN's Three legged Support-
Avatar
15,894 posts
Likes: 13
Joined Nov 2007
Location: Sacramento, CA
     
Jan 13, 2009 14:25 |  #9

Here is someone selling the 1 degree on ebay for the l-358 LINK (external link)


[Gear List | Flickr (external link) | My Reviews] /|\ Tripod Leg Protection (external link) /|\
GIVE a man a fish and he'll eat for a day. TEACH a man to fish and he'll eat for a lifetime.

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
GSansoucie
Senior Member
Avatar
788 posts
Likes: 2
Joined Jul 2005
Location: Southern Maine
     
Jan 13, 2009 14:35 |  #10

FlyingPhotog wrote in post #7068458 (external link)
IIRC, the xxD series spot meter is something like three to three and a half degrees, right?

It's close but one advantage I can see to using the one degree on the Sekonic is the fact that the meter can store and average the readings which would give you a truer picutre of the contrast ratio you're facing. Meter your highlights, meter your shadows, shoot at the resultant average apertue and you're going to be very, very close to all good (especially in RAW)

But, you could do it in your head as well using the camera meter I suppose.

Like Rene said, invaluable in studio but since you have one, why not take it out in the field too.

I only have the stock Lumigrid which I think is roughly a 50 degree FOV but I'll stick it up next to the lens, take a reading then I can eyeball whether or not I'm faced with a scene that's primarilly highlight-heavy or shadow-heavy. It just gives me a ballpark aperture with which to start.


Thanks, I am thinking about this same meter and was wondering if it would provide any usefulness if only for a spot meter and you just sold me with the averaging.


-=Glen=-
Flickr Stream (external link)
Check out my 2010 PaD (external link)
http://www.pbase.com/g​sansoucie (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
realitysays
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
340 posts
Likes: 1
Joined Nov 2008
Location: Northern Beaches, Sydney, NSW
     
Jan 13, 2009 18:53 as a reply to  @ GSansoucie's post |  #11

Thankyou very much for the links and replies. They have proved very useful!

Thanks!


2012 Cams Accredited Motorsport Photographer
Follow Me on Facebook! (external link)
www.flickr.com/photos/​koryleung/ (external link)
www.koryleungphotograp​hy.com.au (external link) - Motorsports & Automotive Photography

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,620 views & 0 likes for this thread
Sekonic L-358 Light Meter
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon Accessories 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is jeffing
707 guests, 313 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.