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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 05 Mar 2009 (Thursday) 07:11
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Blown out Sky

 
dpds68
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Mar 05, 2009 07:11 |  #1

I have been having trouble when I shoot out doors during the Day time with the sky as the background , I shoot totally in Manual and have tried the meter + and - and still no Joy , I have even tried shooting in AV with the meter set at -2 all it did was give me good looking sky but the foreground was black .

The only thing that I can try now is my Metering mode I use Partial .

Here is a example .

P.S. I do not have a CPL or any filter .

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noxcuses1
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Mar 05, 2009 07:21 |  #2

Have you tried using a Polarizing Filter?




  
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Cyclop
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Mar 05, 2009 07:40 |  #3

Yes, try using a quality circular polarizer filter on your lens. That should enhance your photos.


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Curtis ­ N
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Mar 05, 2009 07:43 |  #4

Not sure why this is in the Flash section. Maybe a mod can move it.

The scene you illustrate exceeds the dynamic range of your camera. If you bring the exposure down to show color detail in the sky, the shaded areas will be rendered black.

A polarizing filter can make blue sky appear more saturated if it is exposed correctly, but I don't think it will solve your problem.

To capture detail in both the sky and the shadow areas, you will need to take more than one exposure and then use some method to blend them in post-processing.


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dpds68
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Mar 05, 2009 07:52 |  #5

Thank you to All

Sorry about putting it in the wrong Forum .


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Jark89
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Mar 05, 2009 08:49 |  #6

Without a filter, all you can do is blending multiple exposures (HDR), as Curtis N suggested. You should look into graduated neutral density filters, however.


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Curtis ­ N
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Mar 05, 2009 09:00 |  #7

Jark89 wrote in post #7459464 (external link)
You should look into graduated neutral density filters, however.

Why didn't I think of that?
:oops:


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tenoverthenose
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Mar 05, 2009 09:19 |  #8

Or you could wait until later in the day (or early in the morning) for the few minutes when the correct exposure of the sky and ground would be much closer.


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jacuff
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Mar 05, 2009 09:30 |  #9

Yeah, there's only a few things you can do. (For this case, the metering mode won't matter. You'll still get either a sky that's blown out or foreground that is too dark.)

1st would be to get a ND Grad or Split ND filter. This will bring back the sky so you can meter on the ground to get the right exposure.

2nd would be to bracket several exposure apart and then either do HDR or exposure blending to get a more pleasing image.

A CPL will help to increase contrast in the sky (and remove glare), but it is most effective when the sun is at an angle of 90 degrees from where you are shooting.

Probably the most important thing that hasn't been mentioned yet (well looks like the post above mentioned it), is to evaluate the sky and see if it is pleasing enough to include it in your composition. If not and you don't have a way to make it look more pleasing, maybe its better off if you don't include it. Come back earlier or later in the day or another day when the sky is more pleasing.

Since your shooting outdoors in manual mode, give the Sunny 16 rule a try. If you still want to go by your camera meter, at least be familiar with Sunny 16 so you can compare what the rule says your exposure should be and what exposure your camera is metering.


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mnaz
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Mar 05, 2009 09:35 as a reply to  @ jacuff's post |  #10

If you have lightroom you could use the graduated filter in the develop tab to get some of it back. But a ND would be your best bet to avoid it.


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Mar 05, 2009 09:43 |  #11

Probably the most important thing that hasn't been mentioned yet (well looks like the post above mentioned it), is to evaluate the sky and see if it is pleasing enough to include it in your composition. If not and you don't have a way to make it look more pleasing, maybe its better off if you don't include it. Come back earlier or later in the day or another day when the sky is more pleasing.

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tzalman
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Mar 05, 2009 12:10 |  #12

First, use RAW to maximze dynamic range and post-processability (hows that for a word). Second, in a situation like this what you want is the largest exposure that you can use without blowing out the sky and clouds. Even if this exposure makes them too bright, if they are not clipped all the data will be there and the brightness of the sky can later be reduced using a masking routine (like Lightroom's Graduated Filter tool) or even a simple curve adjustment. At the same time you will be giving the shadows the best exposure you can under the circumstances. The chances are good that in the RAW there will be enough shadow data that they can be lightened quite well. The cost will be increased noise, so it is best to use the lowest ISO possible. To acheive this exposure, spot meter the brightest cloud and add +2 stops. A RAW has about 3 stops of DR above medium grey, so this will leave you enough headroom to prevent clipping.


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Dan-o
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Mar 05, 2009 12:46 |  #13

Here it is a quick edit using the graduated filter in LR.

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Mar 05, 2009 12:49 |  #14

All good advice here. The split ND filter is my personal favorite. Everything is done quickly on site with little need to spend time post processing for the sky. One mantra I also try to keep in mind: "if the sky is white crop tight". If the sky is white and featureless, then crop your photo tighter and minimize the impact of the sky on the composition.


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dpds68
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Mar 05, 2009 14:39 |  #15

Thank you for all of the info .

I am looking at getting a ND Filter , But What's the difference between a ND and a graduated filter ?

David


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Blown out Sky
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