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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 25 May 2009 (Monday) 13:08
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White BG - What to get to Achieve

 
[godfather]
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May 25, 2009 13:08 |  #1
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Currently I have Two Elinchrom 200ri strobes with two 25" square SB and one 135cm Octa

Since I believe I will be using only octa as the mai light, I can buy another light to get the white BG.

Bt I want to know what modifiers will be required to get the white BG.

Also, what size of BG should I get in order to get full body shots. I will be gettin gMuslin from a local tailor here


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jemersonl83
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May 25, 2009 13:19 |  #2

This is the best seamless tutorial I have come accross: http://www.zarias.com/​?p=71 (external link)


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TMR ­ Design
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May 25, 2009 15:49 as a reply to  @ jemersonl83's post |  #3

It very much depends on how large an area you want to render as pure white. Zack's tutorial is good but it's not the 'go to' universal tutorial. There are many factors that come in to play in terms of the space you're working with, the size of the background and the distance from subject to background.

Since you're using Elinchrom strobes, one of the best ways to achieve great coverage at close range with a large and somewhat uniform hot spot is to use the 9.5 inch 135 degree wide angle reflector with a mini silver deflector installed.


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johnboy00
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May 25, 2009 18:13 |  #4

Here's one I did with one light/reflector on white muslin bg and one light/softbox on subject. Subject is around 8' from bg which is about the max I can do. I think I had the bg too hot on this one, and I didn't notice the dress inside-out at bottom right.


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TMR ­ Design
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May 25, 2009 19:59 as a reply to  @ johnboy00's post |  #5

This was shot against 9 foot white seamless. I have one Elinchrom strobe on the left side and one on the right side. By using the 135 degree wide angle reflectors with silver deflectors installed it lets me get even coverage, left to right and top to bottom, at a distance of just under 4 feet from the background. The hot spot is enlarged and the wide angle allows me to work that close without gradation and without any wrap coming back from the background. It's a very efficient way to work in a small studio where you don't have 8 feet between subject and background. The subject was just forward of the lights at about 6 feet from the background. No post processing was done to the white background.

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[godfather]
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May 25, 2009 20:04 |  #6
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Ok you both means I only need a reflector rathera SB or Umbrella?


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[godfather]
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May 25, 2009 20:05 |  #7
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Oh nice Rob, I just posted before seeing your post.


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May 25, 2009 20:08 |  #8

[godfather wrote:
='[godfather];7987033'​]Ok you both means I only need a reflector rathera SB or Umbrella?

There are many techniques but in a small space it's very hard to control an umbrella or softbox and neither gives the coverage of a wide angle reflector with deflector installed. I know it sounds like I'm pushing those modifiers but I haven't found anything else to give me that kind of coverage with such even light.


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May 26, 2009 01:27 |  #9
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I understand the use of refleter, but why we use deflecter with?

Can you please explain?


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May 26, 2009 02:10 |  #10

Robert - considering you didn't post process the b/g of that image you posted, it's an excellent example showing solid technique for the relatively confined area you describe. And that the light doesn't wrap back around the edges of your model or have the background over-cooked reveals how good a control you got with your light placement, power settings, and exposures. Well done, You!


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May 26, 2009 03:37 |  #11
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Also I understand how the BG got the pure white BG but what about the floor?


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iamdogdog
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May 26, 2009 09:54 |  #12

TMR Design wrote in post #7987059 (external link)
There are many techniques but in a small space it's very hard to control an umbrella or softbox and neither gives the coverage of a wide angle reflector with deflector installed. I know it sounds like I'm pushing those modifiers but I haven't found anything else to give me that kind of coverage with such even light.

Hi Robert, can you post link to the wide angle reflector you mentioned(as there are quite some reflectors on your gear list)? I am using genesis and hopefully I can make use of this reflector as well as I got small spaces as well.

Thanks.


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May 26, 2009 10:17 |  #13

As important as the modifier type for even coverage might be, even more important is a flashmeter with many readings taken across the visible background area, to verify eveness of illumination and intensity sufficient to prevent the dreaded grays from happening


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May 26, 2009 10:31 |  #14

[godfather wrote:
='[godfather];7988689'​]I understand the use of refleter, but why we use deflecter with?

Can you please explain?

The deflector is a very important part of the puzzle. Keep in mind that the wide angle reflector only serves to increase the coverage to 135 degrees but it does not change the hot spot. The hot spot still very closely resembles that of a smaller reflector. Adding the deflector reduces the level of the hot spot while increasing the size.

Part of the problem people have when trying to render a white background is that you have a hot spot and then all the areas outside the hot spot where the light is falling causes gradations. When this happens you have two choices. You either expose the background correctly for the hot spot and deal with the gradations or you expose for the corners or edges, causing the hot spot to be driven very far into clipping and excessive amounts of light return to the subject area, often causing wrap, ghosting and halos.

When the hot spot and the overall coverage are increased you virtually eliminate the rapid falloff and gradations and this means you have more control, can work your subject closer to the background without wrap, and cut out tons of unnecessary time at the computer doing post processing.

[godfather wrote:
='[godfather];7989080'​]Also I understand how the BG got the pure white BG but what about the floor?

The sweep at the bottom of the seamless is getting the same amount of light as the middle or edges and the floor behind the subject is also receiving very even lighting due to the wide angle reflector. That light is slightly higher in output because it's the light that is not deflected and is coming out the side of the deflector and wide angle reflector so when it reaches the floor the level is reduced to just about the same level as that of the background.

The subject is lit with a 53" Octa and a large white reflector is used for fill. Since the subject is sitting on the floor, the combination of falloff from subject lighting and the light reflected from the background renders the floor around the subject white with some small areas that are 1/10 to 2/10 stop under but do not show any gradations.

iamdogdog wrote in post #7990460 (external link)
Hi Robert, can you post link to the wide angle reflector you mentioned(as there are quite some reflectors on your gear list)? I am using genesis and hopefully I can make use of this reflector as well as I got small spaces as well.

Thanks.

This is the 135 degree wide angle reflector:

http://www.bhphotovide​o.com …Wide_Angle_Refl​ector.html (external link)

Despite the fact that every image I've ever seen of this reflector appears to have a silver interior, the reflector actually has a white interior which makes for very nice light.

As mentioned above, just having the reflector is not the complete solution. You'll also need the mini silver deflector. Unfortunately you can't just buy the silver, as they are sold in sets which include one silver and one gold.

http://www.bhphotovide​o.com …_Deflector_Set_​2_for.html (external link)


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May 26, 2009 10:33 |  #15

Wilt wrote in post #7990583 (external link)
As important as the modifier type for even coverage might be, even more important is a flashmeter with many readings taken across the visible background area, to verify eveness of illumination and intensity sufficient to prevent the dreaded grays from happening

Absolutely correct Wilt. By using the deflector it gives me such even lighting that I never see more than 1/10 stop difference between the center and any area outside the center, be it top to bottom or left to right. It proves to be very effective.


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White BG - What to get to Achieve
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