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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 12 Jun 2009 (Friday) 20:55
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Monitor Calibration Questions

 
BTBeilke
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Jun 12, 2009 20:55 |  #1

I know that many people calibrate their monitors so that the colors they see on screen match their printed photos. (Or at least that is my current understanding.) So...

1. How can you calibrate any monitor to match printer output? Do actually have to print something (i.e. a color chart) and then use that in the calibration process?

2. Do you have to repeat this process for multiple printers or the same printer using different types of paper? Can you save multiple calibration profiles and switch between them as needed for the printer/paper you plan to use?

3. What do you do for online printing services?

To date, I've not really had any major color issues. While print colors may not always match the on-screen colors, I've not noticed any color cast issues, odd skin tones, etc. However, I just got a new Dell Precision laptop with their RGB LED screen. This screen is fantastic. It is significantly brighter (while being more energy efficient) than my old laptop screen or my desktop flat panel. Also, it supposedly has "100% color availability" as opposed to 42-45% for a standard CCFL backlit panel. (This technology is also coming out in HDTV panels now.) Images on these other screens look dull and dingy in comparison.

My concern with this brighter screen is that the exposure of my prints will be off. (I send most everything I have printed to a lab.) Does monitor calibration also do something to calibrate for exposure also?

I apologize if these "newbie" questions. I am generally pretty proficient technology-wise, but for some reason, I haven't been able to find any simple, straight answers to these questions.

Thanks for your help.


Blane
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Mike ­ R
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Jun 13, 2009 08:52 |  #2

I can some of your questions. When I used MPIX, I was unhappy with the first results, this was when I didn't know about calibration, So they sent me a calibration kit at no charge. It consisted of a print which had color squares on it along with skin tones and other things. There was also a CD with the same image. The concept was to load the CD and then adjust your monitor to match the print. Primitive calibration but it worked. You need to use their print because of the colors in it.

Since then, I have switched labs, to ExposureManager and now use a Spyder2 express for calibration but am thinking of upgrading to Spyder3 elite for greater accuracy.


Mike R
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Piet
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Jun 13, 2009 09:29 |  #3

BTBeilke wrote in post #8100137 (external link)
1. How can you calibrate any monitor to match printer output? Do actually have to print something (i.e. a color chart) and then use that in the calibration process?

You do not match a monitor to a printer, that's often messed up.
The monitor (which in fact includes the graphics card, the device drivers and the OS settings) is calibrated to a standarised profile.
So what you see on your monitor are the "real" colors etc. This one step has nothing to do with the printer.

BTBeilke wrote in post #8100137 (external link)
2. Do you have to repeat this process for multiple printers or the same printer using different types of paper? Can you save multiple calibration profiles and switch between them as needed for the printer/paper you plan to use?.

The same procedure (but with different hard- and software) has to be done for the combo printer/ink/paper. Keep in mind that these 3 belong together; change just one and the output differs.
Now your printer is able to print "real" colors, even if your monitor isn't calibrated and showing it wrong. Yes, if you switch to another paper, your printer needs to know it by switching to another output profile.

Use both together and you got it.

This is the only way to make any picture data interchangable. And now you can use more than one printer on your system, because everything reffers to the standard profiles "in the middle". If everyone "corrects" the pictures just for his current system (monitor => printer), how should they fit to the screens out in the world?

Keep on searching this forum and other sources.
You will not find just one simple answer, because color management is one of the most complex topics in photography. You must be willing to learn at lot of theory and things will get brighter... ;)
Books needed? Try "Real World Color Management" by Bruce Fraser, Chris Murphy & Fred Bunting.

BTBeilke wrote in post #8100137 (external link)
Thanks for your help.

Hope it helps.


Regards,
Piet

  
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Lowner
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Jun 13, 2009 09:35 as a reply to  @ Mike R's post |  #4

Blane,

The monitor calibration is independent of the paper/printer profiles you mention.

The method you mention having used is a "rough and ready" way of getting into the right ballpark, but I prefer to use a calibration device.

Printers should, if they are quality operations, be able to offer you a paper/printer ICC file to which you then softproof the image at a fairly late stage. When I'm printing at home it really is the last thing I do before printing.

And yes, for every different paper I use, I need to have a seperate printer/paper profile. But this is entirely a seperate issue to bringing a monitor into line with accepted standards. And beware, a bright screen is bad news! Most calibrated monitoers appear dark, dismal shadows of their uncalibrated former selves. I'd also be wary of colour claims made by screen manufacturers.


Richard

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ChasP505
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Jun 13, 2009 09:39 |  #5

Piet wrote in post #8102298 (external link)
Books needed? Try "Real World Color Management" by Bruce Fraser, Chris Murphy & Fred Bunting.

Another book recommendation: "Color Management for Photographers" by Andrew Rodney. (external link)

And watch this online seminar. (external link)


Chas P
"It doesn't matter how you get there if you don't know where you're going!"https://photography-on-the.net …p?p=10864029#po​st10864029

  
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BTBeilke
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Jun 13, 2009 10:19 |  #6

Thanks for the replies. What about exposure control or calibration? Is that accomplished by simply adjusting the brightness of your monitor or is there more to it? Do these Spyder (et al) systems calibrate the monitor for exposure also?


Blane
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René ­ Damkot
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Jun 13, 2009 11:13 |  #7

http://www.takegreatpi​ctures.com …anagement_and_D​isplay.fci (external link)


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Lowner
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Jun 13, 2009 13:44 as a reply to  @ René Damkot's post |  #8

Blane,

Sorry, but I don't understand what you mean by "exposure control or calibration"?

I use an Eye One Display Two which assists me to set brightness to a specific level (I use 110CD/M2, but anything between 90-120 is common), gamma (2.2 is fairly universal these days) and colour temperature (I use 6500 deg K). It then produces an ICC file which automatically tweaks the colours.


Richard

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Monitor Calibration Questions
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