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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 19 Jul 2009 (Sunday) 13:13
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Lightsphere and Flipit

 
Shooting
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Jul 19, 2009 13:13 |  #1

Has anyone ever shot an entire wedding from beginning to end and even reception coverage with the lightsphere or the Demb flipit? If so how did you deal with non white walls and/or ceilings or very high ceilings in the chapels.




  
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Jul 19, 2009 15:52 |  #2

If you restricted yourself to one technique for an entire wedding and reception you would be handcuffing yourself. Both of the modifiers you mention slide on and off easily so there is reason to confine yourself to using them beginning to end. In the chapel you might want to use direct flash, or consider a small softbox if the ceilings are too high to bounce off of. I think most of the flash is bounced off the flipit back to the subject so your color cast is probably not going to be significant like it would be if you bounced the flash directly off the colored wall.




  
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Jul 19, 2009 17:39 as a reply to  @ gonzogolf's post |  #3

Ok thanks..I have been using direct flash on a bracket inside the chapel and in the reception halls just to keep from changing things which just adds to the stuff to do. If it were possible I'd like to be able to use one thing thru the entire event rather than using one thing on them getting ready in small rooms, then another for the main chapel and yet change again for the medium sized reception hall...that is 3 changes..AAAHHH.




  
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Jul 19, 2009 17:46 |  #4

I've used a Lumiquest ProMax System through most of a wedding. On a camera flip bracket it would be my system of choice, versatile, light weight, effective with or without close walls (just push the insert into the 80/20).

I could see using a flip-it. I would never use the LightSphere for an entire wedding.


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Jul 19, 2009 19:32 |  #5

Shooting wrote in post #8307921 (external link)
Ok thanks..I have been using direct flash on a bracket inside the chapel and in the reception halls just to keep from changing things which just adds to the stuff to do. If it were possible I'd like to be able to use one thing thru the entire event rather than using one thing on them getting ready in small rooms, then another for the main chapel and yet change again for the medium sized reception hall...that is 3 changes..AAAHHH.


It can be a pain changing things, but remember its all about quality, not convenience for the photographer. Especially at a wedding. I agree with Titus, check out the lumiquest as well as the flipit and the lumiquest or micro apollo softboxes for use on your bracket.




  
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Jul 19, 2009 20:01 as a reply to  @ gonzogolf's post |  #6

Ok..I've tried softboxes before and very little difference in that and direct flash and too much light loss to make up for and deal with. I wish I could do away with a bracket, it gets sooo heavy as the day wears on. I tried using a flipit but so much light loss when there are high ceilings I quit because I do not have the luxury of fast 2.8 lenses.




  
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Jul 19, 2009 20:22 |  #7

Shooting wrote in post #8308592 (external link)
Ok..I've tried softboxes before and very little difference in that and direct flash and too much light loss to make up for and deal with. I wish I could do away with a bracket, it gets sooo heavy as the day wears on. I tried using a flipit but so much light loss when there are high ceilings I quit because I do not have the luxury of fast 2.8 lenses.


You can't beat physics though. To soften light you need to make your light source bigger. With a on camera flash that means either a bounce card, flipit, or some other diffuser, all of those deplete power to some degree. Even faster lenses are not without a tradeoff in that perfect exposure in low light means such a shallow depth of field that you can't get some of the images you want. What kind of flash are you using? Perhaps its time to step up in power.




  
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Jul 19, 2009 20:22 |  #8

http://www.bhphotovide​o.com …ProMax_80_20_Sy​stem_.html (external link)


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Jul 19, 2009 21:34 |  #9

I own both, and use both for weddings. I use the flip-it in church, especially those with a high ceiling. You have to be careful though when shooting the procession. When shooting 5 to 10 feet or so I tilt it straight up; beyond that tilt forward, and closer than that tilt it back. At the reception hall (typically lower ceilings), I'll use the lightsphere because it is more automatic, and works really well under those conditions. When shooting low to catch the chandelier, I'll put the lightsphere's dome in to cut down on the direct light on the ceiling.


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Jul 19, 2009 21:46 |  #10

gonzogolf wrote in post #8308675 (external link)
You can't beat physics though. To soften light you need to make your light source bigger. With a on camera flash that means either a bounce card, flipit, or some other diffuser, all of those deplete power to some degree. Even faster lenses are not without a tradeoff in that perfect exposure in low light means such a shallow depth of field that you can't get some of the images you want. What kind of flash are you using? Perhaps its time to step up in power.

580ex II..




  
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Jul 19, 2009 21:49 |  #11

I used to have the pocket bouncer from them but I could not tell the difference in that and direct flash.




  
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Jul 19, 2009 21:52 |  #12

Ditto - I don't own the entire ProMax system like Dave, but do have the Pocket Bounce and it's swiss cheese brother the 80/20. I use a rotating bracket also.

For recessional and processional I will use direct flash, or angled up a little bit with the white card on the 580ex extended. Outdoors I will use direct flash. At the reception I will be bouncing all the time, again with the lens pointed up and the card extended.

Again, if I need more light I'll put on the Lumiquest which I have been using for about 20 years now. They are inexpensive, very lightweight, not bulky like that other unmentionable, and will slide in a coat or pants pocket quite easily, and not break if you sit on it. :lol:

Titus213 wrote in post #8307965 (external link)
I've used a Lumiquest ProMax System through most of a wedding. On a camera flip bracket it would be my system of choice, versatile, light weight, effective with or without close walls (just push the insert into the 80/20).

I could see using a flip-it. I would never use the LightSphere for an entire wedding.


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Jul 19, 2009 21:56 |  #13

Shooting - what manufacturer's bracket are you using that it's so heavy? If you're not using a Newton, you may want to try it. The basic rotating bracket is around 11 ounces. Mine has more stuff on it so it's a few ounces more, but still incredibly lightweight.

As far as f/2.8, well, I've been using that 24-105 f/4 for several years now with no problems.

Shooting wrote in post #8308592 (external link)
......I wish I could do away with a bracket, it gets sooo heavy as the day wears on. I tried using a flipit but so much light loss when there are high ceilings I quit because I do not have the luxury of fast 2.8 lenses.


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Jul 19, 2009 22:20 |  #14

sapearl wrote in post #8309143 (external link)
Shooting - what manufacturer's bracket are you using that it's so heavy? If you're not using a Newton, you may want to try it. The basic rotating bracket is around 11 ounces. Mine has more stuff on it so it's a few ounces more, but still incredibly lightweight.

As far as f/2.8, well, I've been using that 24-105 f/4 for several years now with no problems.

I'm just using the stroboframe camera flip and it is pretty light but carrying that thing around with camera on it for 7 to 8 hours, it gets heavy real fast. Don't have the $ for something that is more comfortable. Glad to hear you are using the F/4..that makes me feel better..I'm using the 3.5/5.6 range....




  
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Jul 19, 2009 22:20 |  #15

sapearl wrote in post #8309122 (external link)
Ditto - I don't own the entire ProMax system like Dave, but do have the Pocket Bounce and it's swiss cheese brother the 80/20. I use a rotating bracket also.

For recessional and processional I will use direct flash, or angled up a little bit with the white card on the 580ex extended. Outdoors I will use direct flash. At the reception I will be bouncing all the time, again with the lens pointed up and the card extended.

Again, if I need more light I'll put on the Lumiquest which I have been using for about 20 years now. They are inexpensive, very lightweight, not bulky like that other unmentionable, and will slide in a coat or pants pocket quite easily, and not break if you sit on it. :lol:

but you can't use the pull out card in vertical shooting.




  
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Lightsphere and Flipit
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