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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 14 Aug 2009 (Friday) 07:03
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Burned skies - eos 450d

 
EagleX
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Aug 14, 2009 07:03 |  #1

I just came back from germany, and I shot most of my pictures at noon, with the 18-55.
Now, no matter what I do, different aperture, exposure time, exp comp, iso, metering mode, whatever - I almost always getting sky which are totally burned.
I can fix some by shooting with raw, but some photos are doomed from the beginning...
What am I doing wrong?
Thanks.


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JeffreyG
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Aug 14, 2009 07:43 |  #2

Try posting some examples, but the most likely reason for your problem is that you were probably shooting subjects that were in the shade. Your camera doesn't have the dynamic range it would take to properly expose a subject in shade as well as preserve a sunny sky. The difference from light to dark is simply too great.

Your options are:
1. Expose for the subject and blow out the sky.
2. Expose for the sky and underexpose the subject. You call pull up the shadows a bit in post processing.
3. Expose for the sky and light the subject with flash.


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Lowner
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Aug 14, 2009 08:07 as a reply to  @ JeffreyG's post |  #3

Another option is to use a grey grad filter and hold the sky back a little.


Richard

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gjl711
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Aug 14, 2009 08:16 |  #4

Without examples it is difficult to diagnose, but I am guessing that the worst of the pics are shot pointing somewhere from southeast to southwest, and the subject is a little dark. The reason is that the camera is exposing for the subject causing the aperture or shutter speed to be such that the sky will overexpose. A neutral graduated filter will help tremendously in controlling this problem.

However, depending on how bad the overexposure is, there is a very simple way to create a ND filter in photoshop and you may be able to recover much of the detail in the sky while not affecting the subjects at all. As mentioned, a sample would be most beneficial.


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watt100
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Aug 14, 2009 08:23 |  #5

EagleX wrote in post #8458055 (external link)
I just came back from germany, and I shot most of my pictures at noon, with the 18-55.
Now, no matter what I do, different aperture, exposure time, exp comp, iso, metering mode, whatever - I almost always getting sky which are totally burned.
I can fix some by shooting with raw, but some photos are doomed from the beginning...
What am I doing wrong?
Thanks.

the sky photos with the "Kiss X2" (450D) on your Flickr page look OK,
post a pic




  
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stsva
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Aug 14, 2009 12:03 |  #6

If you want to keep the sky from blowing out, try spot metering on the sky then adjusting the exposure upward for your subject. You should probably be able to go up between 1 and 2 stops more exposure (possibly even more) without blowing the sky. See how that does for your main subject and the sky. There may be some cases where the overall dynamic range will be just too much to get both dark subject and bright sky without losing one or the other, but this approach should help avoid blown skies where the dynamic range is a little lower. Note: this approach will be easiest to implement in manual shooting mode.


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EagleX
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Aug 14, 2009 14:06 |  #7

Thanks for you answers and advices, great forum, I will definitely try to implant this methods when shooting in the future.
Some questions regarding this topic:
1. How can I create a nd filter effect in ps?
2. grey grad filter? what is it?
3. I attached 2 examples, random. (read: VERY RANDOM :))
weird... it wont let me upload my pics.


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Canon EOS 7D | EOS 450D | BG-E5 | BG-E7
EF-S 17-55 f/2.8 IS USM | Tokina 11-16 F/2.8 | EF 50 F/1.8| EF 70-200 F/2.8L USM IS II | Speedlite 580EX II

  
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gjl711
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Aug 14, 2009 14:12 |  #8

EagleX wrote in post #8460162 (external link)
Some questions regarding this topic:
1. How can I create a nd filter effect in ps?
2. grey grad filter? what is it?
3. I attached 2 examples, random. (read: VERY RANDOM :))
weird... it wont let me upload my pics.

1. It's a simple technique where you create a duplicate layer, make adjustments to that layer, and blend it back into the first layer. Here is a very nice tutorial.
http://pshero.com …ed-neutral-density-filter (external link)
There are other ways as well but this one is quick and easy.

2. by gray I believe they meant neutral density grad.
http://www.singh-ray.com/grndgrads.html (external link)


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
I used to hate math but then I realised decimals have a point.
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DYORD
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Aug 15, 2009 02:26 |  #9

JeffreyG wrote in post #8458183 (external link)
Your camera doesn't have the dynamic range it would take to properly expose a subject in shade as well as preserve a sunny sky.

I have the same camera.. (450D) Do other cameras have wider dynamic range than 450D does?

re: burned skies; This issue has been my dilemma ever since I started photography.. I think the problem is the time frame when you're shooting. It's really hard to get a good photo when shooting at noon. Unless you use graduated ND filters.

Try shooting at diffrent time of the day (early morning or afternoon). And shoot opposite the sun (if you want a detailed foreground).


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Shadowblade
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Aug 15, 2009 02:28 |  #10

You need to either use HDR or get a set of graduated ND filters. Or both, even.




  
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JeffreyG
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Aug 15, 2009 08:17 |  #11

DYORD wrote in post #8463078 (external link)
I have the same camera.. (450D) Do other cameras have wider dynamic range than 450D does?

Not really. The dynamic ranges (DR) of all digital cameras are roughly equal. Some people will argue a 1/3 stop here or there, but functionally they are all pretty much the same.

One little known thing by most casual photographers is that digital camera DR is about as narrow as color slide film.

A lot of people used to shoot color print film which has a huge DR and then get it processed by a lab. What these people didn't know was that labs commonly pushed and pulled stuff to cover up an host of exposure errors. The latitude of the film allowed for it.

Moving to digital (or if you shot color slide film) makes you learn proper exposure right quick because there is simply no latitude for a miss.


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I use a Canon 5DIII and a Sony A7rIII

  
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gjl711
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Aug 15, 2009 09:38 |  #12

DYORD wrote in post #8463078 (external link)
Do other cameras have wider dynamic range than 450D does?

Not really. There is a slight variation, but not much. Check out table #3 in this link.
http://www.clarkvision​.com …/digital.signal​.to.noise/ (external link)

JeffreyG wrote in post #8463678 (external link)
A lot of people used to shoot color print film which has a huge DR .

I'm not so sure that there is that big of a difference. This is a pretty old link but it concludes that there is not that big of a differance.
http://www.clarkvision​.com/imagedetail/dynam​icrange2/ (external link)


Not sure why, but call me JJ.
I used to hate math but then I realised decimals have a point.
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Burned skies - eos 450d
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