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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Weddings & Other Family Events Talk 
Thread started 21 Aug 2009 (Friday) 10:17
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prime question

 
shooter ­ mcgavin
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Aug 21, 2009 10:17 |  #1

I may be shooting a couple of weddings in the upcoming year, and I just wanted to get some advice early so that I know which direction I should go as far as gear is concerned.
I currently have a 20D, Sigma 30 f/1.4 and Canon 60 f/2.8 Macro, and I will be getting a 40D and a 430ex before the end of the year.

My question is, if you had to choose two other lenses to add to my others, which would you choose? I am pretty partial to prime lenses, and by having two bodies to switch between, I don't think that I will feel limited. I do not have a very large camera fund, and the expectations for these weddings aren't exactly high, but I know I can blow them out of the water :) ....errrr hope...

Anyway, I'm looking into getting something a bit longer and faster...maybe an 85 f/1.8 or 100 f/2 for candids and ceremony?
I'm also looking into something wider for group shots, but I'm not really having luck finding anything that I would be happy with....sub-$1,000. Any suggestions?
Does anyone use the 30 for group shots? Do I really need something wider?

I have never felt limited by my lenses in the past, but for a wedding, I want to make sure that I'm fully prepared.

Thanks in advance!




  
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bric-a-brac
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Aug 21, 2009 10:58 |  #2

the 100/2 for sure, unless you can find a used 135/2L. I LOVE my 135L for weddings. The last one I shot was particularly dark and I was shooting 1/80th sec with a monopod, F/2, ISO1600. You don't know how much flexibility an extra stop gives you until you need it.

I also shoot on crop cameras. I like my 50/1.4 but recently I've found it to be a little to narrow. That being said, I'm looking at moving into a 35L. So to answer your question in a very roundabout way, I think I would be comfortable shooting a whole wedding with a 30 or 35/1.4 on one camera and either the 100 or 135/2 on the other. You don't *need* wider than 30 very often, but there may be times where you would find the option nice to have.

If you're a prime guy, I'd say you're moving towards the start of a good setup.


"a photograph isn't about what something looks like, but what it's like to look."
50D|35L|other stuff

  
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Aug 21, 2009 11:38 |  #3

...You need wider than 30 on a crop sensor camera for formals, unless you have plenty of room.


Las Vegas Wedding Photographer: http://www.joeyallenph​oto.com (external link)

  
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shooter ­ mcgavin
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Aug 21, 2009 12:53 |  #4

Thanks for your responses!
I've been looking into one of the tonika wide angles. (11-16 or 12-24).
Does anyone have experience using those for a wedding?
I'm thinking of getting one of those and a 100 f/2 (the 135 price is pretty steep right now for me).

So that would put me at:
Tokina 11-16 f/2.8
Sigma 30 f/1.4
Canon 60 f/2.8
Canon 100 f/2
about $1,550 invested

When I eventually get a couple of full-frame bodies, my setup could upgrade nicely into:
Canon 16-35 f/2.8
Canon 50 f/1.2
Canon 100 f/2.8 macro
Canon 135 f/2
about $4,000 invested

That seems like a nice little combo to me for the kind of shooting I want to do.

That's the direction I'm heading now, but if anyone has any wisdom/input to share, I'm more than open to suggested improvements.




  
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Svetlana
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Aug 21, 2009 13:55 |  #5

I don't really see why you would need 2 macro lenses in your first set up...Don't forget 100 f/2 may be a tad slow for fast moving objects, I rarely hear it's used for portraits (it's not IS either)...


Canon 7D, 5Dmk2, 70-200mm f/2.8L II IS, Canon 50 1.2L, 35 1.4L, 85 1.8, Canon 16-35L, Canon 100 2.8L IS Macro, Speedlight 580EX II x 2, 430 EX, enthusiasm.:D http://svetlanayanova.​com/ (external link)

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nicksan
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Aug 21, 2009 16:20 |  #6

Svetlana wrote in post #8500099 (external link)
I don't really see why you would need 2 macro lenses in your first set up...Don't forget 100 f/2 may be a tad slow for fast moving objects, I rarely hear it's used for portraits (it's not IS either)...

The 100 f2 is a tad slow how?

Aperture?
AF speed?

On a crop, I would tend to agree that it might be too long for portraits, but as far as AF speed, it's on par with the 85 1.8. Aperture-wise, it would be a wash. The only thing is getting the shutter speeds at 100mm vs. 85mm IMO.

I've had this lens, and it's a good performer. The 135L is better, but not by a dramatic amount.




  
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tim
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Aug 21, 2009 17:26 |  #7

Wedding FAQ.

You need wider just in case you're stuck in a small room or something. 17-55 F2.8 IS (external link) would be perfect.


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Read all my FAQs (wedding, printing, lighting, books, etc)

  
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Peacefield
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Aug 23, 2009 11:19 |  #8

Work with your ultimate list in mind and make the investment one step at a time, even if it means going slowly. For me, I'm able to work with just two primes nearly all day: a 35L on a 5d2 (which makes it sufficiently wide) and an 85 1.2 L on my 50D (which essentially turns it into a faster 135). Having the two different sensors allows me to also get two additional focal lengths. The reality, though, is these two lenses stay on these two bodies nearly all day. I do have the older less expensive Sigma 10-20 on an XT for my widest shots.

My only change is to occassionally go to the 24-70 on the 5D2. I like the zoom's flexibility for the reception and sometimes even put it on for the up and down the aisle shots when I can use flash.

BTW, I put this set up together with dark churches in mind. I don't necessarily prefer primes but I want the speed they offer (which is why I went 1.2 on the 85 instead of 1.8 in spite of the many extra $'s). When I shoot an outdoor wedding, being free of dark spaces and walls, the 24-70 will go on the 50D and the 70-200 IS 2.8 on the 5D2. No need to change lenses at all with this setup for an outdoor ceremony.

An expensive collection of lenses; I guess ~$6k or so. But I'll say the obvious when I tell you to consider it an investment. Add them a few at a time and keep your potential earnings in mind.

Of course, it's all a matter of personal style; this is what works very well for me. Good luck.


Robert Wayne Photography (external link)

5D3, 5D2, 50D, 350D * 16-35 2.8 II, 24-70 2.8 II, 70-200 2.8 IS II, 100-400 IS, 100 L Macro, 35 1.4, 85 1.2 II, 135 2.0, Tokina 10-17 fish * 580 EX II (3) Stratos triggers * Other Stuff plus a Pelican 1624 to haul it all

  
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coryparris
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Aug 23, 2009 11:56 |  #9

Using a full frame camera I use:
24L, 50 1.4 Sigma, 85 1.8, 135 2.0. I also use a 16-35L at times and a 50 2.5 macro for a few details (rarely more than 10-20 images of the 3000 I shoot at a wedding).

For you, I would recommend the 85 1.8 as the long and a wide angle of some sort. When I shot with a crop camera years ago, I used a 12-24 Tokina that was very sharp, but not fast enough for my taste.


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Blog of said Seattle wedding photographer (external link)

  
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PMCphotography
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Sep 04, 2009 00:32 as a reply to  @ coryparris's post |  #10

If you like primes the 35 f/2 is a great lens. I don't use mine often but when I do the shots turn out great.


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caught14
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Sep 04, 2009 12:01 as a reply to  @ PMCphotography's post |  #11

I will second what Peacefield said -- look long term when investing in lenses. Get one really good lens instead of two medium quality ones. Starting out a couple years ago I am so glad I did this. It will take longer to build your collection, but if you don't do it this way then you my find yourself having to resell to upgrade and you will end up losing $$. The other benefit about buying high end lenses is that they hold their value very well.

That being said, I realize you aren't working with a big budget. So here are my recommendations, along with high end lens recommendations:

1) For a telephoto lens - the 85 f/1.8 or 100 f/2. With your crop sensors, those will be plenty long. The 85 has great IQ and focuses fast. If you can afford it, the 135L is one of Canon's best. IQ is stunning, the lens is fast, and it's one of the most their most affordable in the "L" series.

2) On the wide end, your 30 will probably be okay for group shots, especially if they are outside. Inside the church, you might have to back up some and it could bring the front pews into play if there isn't a lot of room. But honestly you will appreciate the wider end more for times when you are in a tight spot or a small room and can't back up. If you go the budget sensitive route, Canon has a 20 f/2.8 and a 24 f/2.8. If you can afford it, go for the 17-55 f/2.8 or the 16-35 f/2.8. The 17-40 is similar, but the aperture doesn't let as much light in at f/4. Very important for dark churches, preparation rooms, and receptions.

Good luck!


Colling Photography (external link)
Cameras & Lenses - Canon 5DMkII x 3 | 30D | 24
L | 35L | 45 TS | 50L | 85IIL | 135L | 16-35IIL | 24-105L | 70-200L
www.collingphotogaller​y.com (external link)

  
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