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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 28 Oct 2009 (Wednesday) 00:23
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Waitaminute...is my 70-200 f4L (non-IS) plastic?

 
mrkgoo
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Oct 28, 2009 00:23 |  #1

I'm looking at it very closely, and I swear the parts in between the rings are coated differently - and they don't feel as cold as the metal rings...is it plastic? I honestly can't tell.

Also, is my EF 1.4xII plastic body as well?

I know it doesn't matter, I honestly can't tell, just curious is all.




  
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binlerne
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Oct 28, 2009 00:27 |  #2

From what I remember from my f/4 IS version, it was plastic and metal. I believe it is polycarbonate which is very durable. It saves weight. The only outside parts that are metal I think are the zoom and focus rings. And of course inside parts besides the glass...


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mrkgoo
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Oct 28, 2009 00:28 |  #3

binlerne wrote in post #8908724 (external link)
From what I remember from my f/4 IS version, it was plastic and metal. I believe it is polycarbonate which is very durable. It saves weight. The only outside parts that are metal I think are the zoom and focus rings. And of course inside parts besides the glass...

I know the IS ones uses polycarbonate. If the non-IS version also uses polycarbonate, I've been living a lie all these years :p




  
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binlerne
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Oct 28, 2009 00:31 |  #4

Haha well, like you said it doesn't really matter as long as the images are good.


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phreeky
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Oct 28, 2009 02:47 |  #5

Plastic has its advantages (mainly weight), and some plastic is very strong too.

The 400mm F/5.6 also has some small plastic sections. I'm sure plenty of other primes do too except for mainly the larger aperture big guys (and even then it wouldn't surprise me, to try and keep weight down).




  
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Jman13
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Oct 28, 2009 05:19 |  #6

A LOT of L lenses are plastic bodied.

17-40L
24L II
35L
50L
100L Macro
135L
both 70-200 f/4's
24-105L

And I think a few others as well. Don't worry, plastic is very tough.


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Bear ­ Dale
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Oct 28, 2009 06:07 |  #7

Ever been in the military? You'd be surprised at just how many things are plastic or have a plastic component to them.


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mortar
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Oct 28, 2009 06:13 |  #8

One word,,,, "Glock"..

:~)


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mrkgoo
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Oct 28, 2009 09:15 |  #9

I KNOW a lot of lenses are plastic I don't have a problem with it at all. It's just that I had the 70-200 f4l for years and only just noticed.

I remember in the 70-200 f4 L IS thread, someone was disappointed in the IS build - but if the non-IS is plastic as well...Also, someone asked Canon about the IS plastic, and the rep confirmed they 'switched' to plastic to save weight. At the time, I assumed they meant switched when they made the IS. If they also switched for the 70-200f4L, then when was the last metal one?




  
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reprod
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Oct 28, 2009 10:11 |  #10

So is the 70-200 f/2.8 IS all metal or also part polycarbonate?


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gasrocks
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Oct 28, 2009 13:04 |  #11

How many things theses days are all metal?


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msowsun
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Oct 28, 2009 13:18 |  #12

reprod wrote in post #8910660 (external link)
So is the 70-200 f/2.8 IS all metal or also part polycarbonate?

I think both 70-200 2.8's are all metal.

Here is one guy that was not too happy about his plastic 70-200 4 IS:

http://74.125.95.132/s​earch?q=cache:...&ct=c​lnk&gl=us (external link)

"While in Iceland, my 70-200 f/4L IS took a fall into a tall soft field of grass. I would expect even the cheapest of kit lenses to survive this fall. My 70-200 came apart. Upon closer examination, the entire outerbarrel from the zoom ring back to the lens mount is made of a very thin plastic. It is made tolook like the strong rugged white metal that we are accustomed to on L-lenses. This area has to hold the heavy part of the lens with all the lens elements. The heavy part is attached via four very small and light plastic tabs with screws. All 4 plastic tabs snapped at the screws rendering the lens completely unusable and in two pieces. This is unacceptable lens construction for something to be purported as a professional grade lens designed for heavy duty field use. User beware!

While, optically, it is one of Canon's best zooms, physically it isnot constructed for environments where it might be shocked, vibrated, or tossed around. After examining the lens further, I am convinced that these plastic tabs had started to break even before the fall, possibly due to the rough roads that we encountered along the way. It is a very disappointing and troubling development - we cannot have our lenses be cheapened like this -I would gladly pay $20 or $50 more for a lens that weighs one or two more ounces with a metalouter barrel."


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Mike ­ Deep
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Oct 28, 2009 13:30 |  #13

gasrocks wrote in post #8911885 (external link)
How many things theses days are all metal?

...Leicas?


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birdfromboat
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Oct 28, 2009 13:32 |  #14

In Iceland, plastic might be a drawback. I work with plastics and the ability to deform and return to nominal is a very desirable trait for a lens barrel, and many other products. The age of metal=good and plastic = cheap is over. BUT in some environments like extreme cold, it takes very little understanding of the physical properties of MOST plastics to realise there could be a problem
with brittleness. sounds like that is what is at work here.
I too thought that all of the white lenses were metal throughout, and most of the L glass as well. Live and learn.


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mrkgoo
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Oct 28, 2009 14:04 |  #15

SO can anyone confirm that they switched from metal to plastic in the non-IS f4L, or has it always been plastic, or am I hallucinating, and it's actually metal?




  
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Waitaminute...is my 70-200 f4L (non-IS) plastic?
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