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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 04 Jan 2010 (Monday) 18:14
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Best Backdrop colors to start with for Family/Wedding Portraits?

 
Titus213
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Jan 05, 2010 12:47 |  #16

Another vote for grey if you plan on gelling the BG. There is another thread here that duscusses this and has photos...

https://photography-on-the.net …p?t=797509&high​light=gels

http://www.prophotonut​.com …dio-portraits-techniques/ (external link)


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pcj
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Jan 05, 2010 12:56 |  #17

belsokar wrote in post #9329394 (external link)
Another follow-up question,...does the gelled light need to be dead center for best effect? The main reason I ask is if I'm shooting some smaller models (i.e. kids), I may not be able to setup a background light low and center like some of the examples I have seen.

I shoot mine in from the side, but it definitely causes imbalance (the white isn't totally colored) - see this for an example (external link)

When I'm wanting it to white out entirely, I put a Genesis back there instead. My new barn doors have gels for the Genesis, so I should be able to overcome this.

Again though - the further away the model and Genesis lights, the better the color effect will be on the back. I run out of room before this is perfect though


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111t
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Jan 05, 2010 15:18 |  #18

belsokar wrote in post #9329394 (external link)
Another follow-up question,...does the gelled light need to be dead center for best effect? The main reason I ask is if I'm shooting some smaller models (i.e. kids), I may not be able to setup a background light low and center like some of the examples I have seen.

Well there are a couple of things you can do. You could set your light basically on the floor. There is a calumet stand that does this well and cheaply. (It's not really unique, tons of companies make them) I have one of these and the build quality is good. For $20 you can't go wrong.

http://www.calumetphot​o.com/item/MF6020/ (external link)

The vertical extension pole can be removed and if you look closely you'll see this little brass stud at the tip of one of the feet. This can go in place of the vertical pole. That'll be just fine for kids that are standing where you aren't taking a full length shot.

"But what if it's a baby sitting on the floor?" you may ask. You can make a little 'stage' out of some of those adjustable folding tables. I put 2 of them together so they are about 2 feet off the floor. The surface is about 4 1/2 feet square. Run your backdrop to the floor, then along the floor enough for you to set the backlight stand on, then up and over the top of the table. Now the background light is recessed. If you shoot from approximately the same level as the child, you won't notice the gap in the photo. (obviously you would notice a completely different color from a gel on the backdrop, but that's all part of the picture.) It is important to note that whenever shooting a young child on a table, They be CONSTANTLY supervised by someone whose SOLE JOB is to intervene if they are in any danger of the child getting to close to the edge.

The mother is usually the obvious choice. Just make sure she knows where she won't interfere with the lighting.

Here's a question for the group. Have any of you run into problems with the mirror finish of the genesis reflector? I've seen grummblings of uneven light patterns from them. I haven't used my genesis 400's as background lights yet and i never really notice a hotspot problem when all i'm doing is blasting them at white umbrellas.


All The best!
-Paul

WHAT TO DO IF YOU DON"T HAVE A LIGHT METER AND YOU STILL WANT TO MAKE INTELLIGENT EXPOSURE DECISIONS.

  
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Best Backdrop colors to start with for Family/Wedding Portraits?
FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
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