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Thread started 08 Jan 2010 (Friday) 13:39
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5D2 metering: anyone else need +2/3 or +1 all the time?

 
Trevor04GT
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Mar 11, 2010 00:22 |  #46

Weird, mine seems to like to overexpose..


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golf88
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Mar 11, 2010 00:31 |  #47

I haven't really noticed that I need +2/3 or +1, usually just 0 is fine on evaluative metering and AV. Lately I've been using spot metering though and trying to manually expose for critical elements. For example, I would take a picture of a very dark skinned man at around -1.5 or -2.0 EC (spot metered on his skin). Lighter skin individuals can be +0.5 or +1.0. This seems to work just fine as well.


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THE ­ TROOPER
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Mar 11, 2010 04:54 |  #48

I suppose it depends on situation and lens but yes Im usually +1/3 - +1


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Jesper
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Mar 11, 2010 08:36 |  #49

anthony11 wrote in post #9770978 (external link)
How am I using the spot meter? Is that a trick question? I set the metering mode to spot and I pressed the shutter release.

Using the spot meter requires some knowledge. It's not just a question of putting the camera on spot metering and just pressing the shutter release without thinking about metering anymore.

When you use the spot meter, the camera only looks at a small area in the middle of the frame to determine what exposure to use (aperture and shutter speed). (In evaluative mode, it will measure the whole frame instead of just a spot in the middle). The camera will setup the exposure so that the spot in the middle comes out with a brightness of "middle gray". If you in fact have something lighter than "middle gray" in the middle of the frame, your shot will become underexposed, and if you have something darker, it will become overexposed.

You will have to use + or - lighting compensation in such situations. That's to be expected and is not a flaw in the meter of your camera.

Have a look at this: Understanding Camera Metering (external link), Why Spot Metering (external link)


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aubsxc
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Mar 11, 2010 12:04 |  #50

anthony11 wrote in post #9770978 (external link)
How am I using the spot meter? Is that a trick question? I set the metering mode to spot and I pressed the shutter release.

No, its not a trick question. Based on your response, I don't think you understand how the different metering modes in your camera work, and I believe you would be best served by picking up a book and/or reading an online tutorial that explains the basics of exposure and metering.


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Cicero
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Mar 12, 2010 13:02 |  #51

I got mine today and noticed the some problem.. had to go +2/3.
While on 7D i dont need to make any EC.


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Martin.D
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Mar 12, 2010 16:49 as a reply to  @ Cicero's post |  #52

One thing to consider and this caught me out if I'm not using the histogram - if your viewing the image through the LCD display watch out for the light sensor adjusting the light on the rear automatically :p


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EdBray
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Mar 12, 2010 17:09 |  #53

According to Canon themselves their DSLR meters are calibrated against 12% grey which is +2/3 stops above 18% grey.

The best way to get a great exposure for your subject without resorting to HDR is to spot meter fom a mid range to white subject from the brightest area in you wish to retain detail and then open up by 2-2.5 stops If the subject is between mid range and black then spot meter from the darkest area in which you wish to retain detail and then stop down by 2-2.5 stops. A little trail and error will be required initially to find out the range of your sensor, once you know the ideal setting that will be what you set every time.

Exposing for the subject and letting the rest block out or blow out is the best way of getting a good image without the use of HDR.

I placed an Understanding Exposure thread here which may help! (external link)


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anthony11
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Mar 18, 2010 12:36 |  #54

TheBurningCrown wrote in post #9771674 (external link)
Generally, for the type of shooting that I do I'm using Manual mode 99% of the time, and for the last year or so my de-facto metering mode has been partial (as close to spot as I can get on my 350D). To meter, I use some rule-of thumb metering values (black is generally -1EV, white is generally +1EV, the palm of my hand is ~1 2/3EV etc.). For a particular scene I'll do several meterings, dial in what I've determined to be the correct exposure, focus, recompose, and then finally press the shutter.

I'll surmise that you shoot static subjects.

For the most part, spot metering isn't really a "set it and forget" kind of a metering mode. To really use it correctly you need to change your technique.

I've read more than once that spot metering is appropriate for a backlit subject to avoid the background from causing the subject to be underexposed. That's the only situation where I use spot metering. I use evaluative most of the time.


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anthony11
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Mar 18, 2010 12:38 |  #55

aubsxc wrote in post #9775100 (external link)
No, its not a trick question. Based on your response, I don't think you understand how the different metering modes in your camera work, and I believe you would be best served by picking up a book and/or reading an online tutorial that explains the basics of exposure and metering.

Um, I understand metering modes just fine, and cookie-cutter condescension like the above doesn't change that.


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bomzai
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Mar 18, 2010 14:01 as a reply to  @ anthony11's post |  #56

I use +1/3 (2/3) in poor light, otherwise exposures are fine, but I mostly use evaluative metering.

Plus I shoot RAW, so I tend to be conservative (it's much harder, even impossible in many cases, to fill blown highlights than to deal with a tiny bit extra noise in shadows due to exposure pull) and keep in mind that I can add up to 2/3 stop exposure in post without any problem.


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TheBurningCrown
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Mar 18, 2010 16:06 |  #57

anthony11 wrote in post #9822352 (external link)
I'll surmise that you shoot static subjects.

Well yes, hence "the type of shooting that I do" ;).

anthony11 wrote in post #9822352 (external link)
I've read more than once that spot metering is appropriate for a backlit subject to avoid the background from causing the subject to be underexposed. That's the only situation where I use spot metering. I use evaluative most of the time.

Which is a very general statement. If the subject is backlit (in a certain tolerance range), using spot metering on the subject WILL yield a better (brighter) exposure than if you didn't, but it doesn't mean that it will be a correct exposure. If your subject is wearing black clothing, for example, with spot metering your shot will be overexposed. You can use spot metering for backlit subjects, but you still need to dial in exposure compensation based on what you're metering off of.


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Wilt
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Mar 18, 2010 16:07 |  #58

For someone of Caucasian backgroud, skin value is about +1EV lighter than 18% gray, which is what exposure meters are trying to make everything average out to, in a shot! So if you spot meter a face, the reading is taking a +1EV subject and making it too dark. Use of EC = +1 when metering a face would render the face at the proper level of brightness. The meter tries to take a Scandanavian bride in white wedding gown in a snow scene, and make that 18% gray, too, so EC is needed to add exposure to what the meter indicates. Similarly the meter tries to take a Nigerian bridegroom in black tuxedo in a coal mine, and make that 18% gray, too, so EC is neede to reduce exposure from what the meter indicates. I know my own skin is +1.3EV compared to an 18% gray card.

Post your sample shots, and I think we'll see the above in the photos.


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Mar 18, 2010 16:23 |  #59

Metered 18% gray card with Minolta Spotmeter F: 1/500 f/8 ISO100
Metered 18% gray card with Canon 40D: 1/500 f/8 ISO100
Metered 18% gray card with Canon 5D: 1/500 f/8 ISO100

Metered sky about 60 degrees from sun with Minolta Spotmeter F: 1/500 f/8 ISO100
Metered sky about 60 degrees from sun with Canon 40D: 1/500 f/8 ISO100
Metered sky about 60 degrees from sun with Canon 5D: 1/500 f/8 ISO100

Readings of the sky are affected by angular spacing to the sun, and dispersion of light by moisture in the air. Sky a few more degrees away indicated 1/400 f/8, for example

Metered with Minolta Autometer Vf incident meter: 1/500 f/8 ISO100

Sunny 16 rule of thumb expects ISO100, 1/100 f/16 or 1/400 f/8


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JeffreyG
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Mar 18, 2010 17:19 |  #60

anthony11 wrote in post #9822352 (external link)
I'll surmise that you shoot static subjects.

I shoot M mode and use either a zone system or an incident meter 95% of the time and I certainly do not shoot still subjects. I venture that M mode is typically the fastest method overall for shooting sports and action.

I've read more than once that spot metering is appropriate for a backlit subject to avoid the background from causing the subject to be underexposed. That's the only situation where I use spot metering. I use evaluative most of the time.

So long as your subject is close to middle grey in tone, spot metering them will correct for backlight. If your subject is white or black, it sure won't work.

I find applying some light myself with a flash is a better fix for backlight anyway.


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5D2 metering: anyone else need +2/3 or +1 all the time?
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