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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 16 Feb 2010 (Tuesday) 14:10
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? about perfect exposure

 
doublehmom
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Feb 16, 2010 14:10 |  #1

This has probably been asked but I was just wondering, do you ever get to the point where you know exactly what apeture, ss, iso to use in any situation? I was taking some pics of my daughter in her room around noon today, window open, very bright due to snow and was wondering what would someone like Scott Kelby do? My photos are terrible, too many blown out parts. Anyway, just wondering.




  
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snyderman
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Feb 16, 2010 14:29 |  #2

When I just started out, and that wasn't so long ago, and was confused about what settings to use in manual, I'd put the camera in full auto and look what the camera chose for settings. Put camera back in manual duplicate the settings and see what I could get on my own. Adjust from there.

One tip about exposure I read here at POTN that made a lot of sense to me was this: Set your DOF first, (apeture); then set a shutter speed at which you feel comfortable; finally, raise ISO until you have a proper exposure. For example, when shooting your daughter in her room, set a reasonable apeture so the part(s) of her you want in focus are in focus for how far you are from her. Next, set a comfortable hand-holding shutter speed like 1/200 maybe. Adjust ISO until you have the needle close to a proper exposure and take the shot. Adjust ISO or shutter speed as necessary.

Go take a shot and let's see what you get!

dave


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Sorarse
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Feb 16, 2010 14:53 |  #3

I'll make an educated guess but I can pretty much guarantee I'll have to tweak the settings from my original thoughts to get it right.


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RPCrowe
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Feb 16, 2010 15:54 |  #4

Lots of times, blown out images are not a function of camera settings but of an image that contains an exposure ratio which cannot be captured by the digital sensor.

In this case, you need to adjust and manipulate the lighting. When shooting with window light, the distance of your subject from the window will control the key light. The fill light MIGHT be supplied by another wall reflecting onto the shadow portion of your subject's face but, that is too serendipitous to count on with any regularity. A reflector is the tool for bringing the exposure ratio down to one that your sensor can capture.

Additionally, showing a portion of the window in your frame will also cause blown out highlights.

Despite many photographers claim that they "Want to shoot with natural light because it looks natural!" many photographers shoot with unmodified natural light because they don't know how to control light sources.

Unfortunately, unmodified "NATURAL" light often looks very "UN-NATURAL"


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neilwood32
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Feb 16, 2010 16:22 |  #5

I think a lot of people can get very close with their exposure guesstimates.

I tend to use Sunny 16 and work from there adjusting aperture and SS to get my "correct" exposure.

As PRCrowe suggests, modifying the light might be the only way to avoid blown out highlights. Either a reflector to use existing light or flash to overpower the incoming light (adding light will actually even out the exposure)


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doublehmom
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Feb 16, 2010 16:49 |  #6

Thanks, everyone. I have a 7d with 28-135mm kit lens. This is just a pic I snapped fast, I think it is in dummy mode, does it look soft to you, it also looks like it has a lot of noise. It is probably just me, not the camera. I do need to get a speedlite and a better lens for sure. I am renting a tamron 24-75 before I invested in one~want to make sure it is really what I want. I applied sharpening on the second one. What do you all think? I am probably just freaking out like I always do with a new camera. I just need to relax and have fun shooting!!!


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egordon99
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Feb 16, 2010 19:31 as a reply to  @ doublehmom's post |  #7

^ Shots look fine (sharpness-wise) at that small size. I'm also not seeing ANY noise.

Not a fan of the harsh direct flash/shadow though. I highly recommend a speedlight if you want your pictures to NOT look like they came out of Point-N-Shoot.

So you settled on the 7D? My good friend has one (upgraded from a Rebel XT!) and she is LOVING it!

Relax and have fun shooting! (and spending time with your kids ;) )




  
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IUnknown
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Feb 16, 2010 19:42 |  #8

Yeah, and if you do get a speedlight, point it backwards so the back becomes a softbox and you will get more flattering results.


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egordon99
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Feb 16, 2010 19:44 |  #9

IUnknown wrote in post #9623428 (external link)
Yeah, and if you do get a speedlight, point it backwards so the back becomes a softbox and you will get more flattering results.

Great advice! I used to just do a straight ceiling bounce, but depending what the walls are like, bouncing behind you or to the side usually gets much better results.




  
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doublehmom
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Feb 16, 2010 20:09 |  #10

Darn, I sold my 580ex2 but it was a little too much for me, I never could figure it out but I never spend anytime on it either~never even opened the manual. I am looking for a simple speedlite for a simple minded person.

egordon99-I am loving my 7d, just need to figure it out. I feel terrible spending that much money becasue of my family situation but my very nice husband said to forget about the money and just enjoy and that I must keep this camera a year~lol!!!




  
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DreDaze
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Feb 16, 2010 20:54 |  #11

i'm confused by the amount that you buy and sell here...are you using all that stuff, and then selling it quickly?...if so I highly recommend holding onto a camera and lens combo for at least 6 months without buying anything else...it'd help your photography....and also let you figure out exactly what you want in a new lens when you do buy one


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Morlow
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Feb 17, 2010 05:00 |  #12

I have noticed I can make much better original guesses than I used to. That said, it is still usually quite a bit off and requires quite a bit of tweaking and test shots.


Chris Knapp

  
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HappySnapper90
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Feb 17, 2010 11:28 |  #13

doublehmom wrote in post #9623598 (external link)
Darn, I sold my 580ex2 but it was a little too much for me, I never could figure it out but I never spend anytime on it either~never even opened the manual. I am looking for a simple speedlite for a simple minded person.

If you want better flash results than with your pop-up flash, you'll need to learn advanced usage and open the manual of any external flash you use. Otherwise it would just be a more powerful direct flash. Good flash photography is something that takes quite some time to figure out and get good at. Or you could take a class or workshop in external flash use.

The pop-up flash if for simple minded people.




  
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neilwood32
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Feb 17, 2010 11:48 |  #14

Even the lower end external flashes need to be learned otherwise as Robert says, it will just be a bigger version of the on board flash.

With ETTL metering, external flash shouldnt be to difficult to learn. Bouncing does make a huge difference to image quality.


Having a camera makes you no more a photographer than having a hammer and some nails makes you a carpenter - Claude Adams
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doublehmom
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Feb 17, 2010 21:25 |  #15

Thanks everyone. I appreciate it. I am going to take a 7d camera course at my local camera shop the a speedlite one.




  
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? about perfect exposure
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