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FORUMS Photo Sharing & Visual Enjoyment Motorsports 
Thread started 28 Feb 2010 (Sunday) 16:51
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Motocross-My first shots?

 
OldNick
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Mar 07, 2010 20:36 as a reply to  @ post 9748917 |  #31

100 ISO is good, because you have plenty of light.

I would tend to use Tv mode for action shots, because you want control of the shutter for sharp or blur. However that does come at the expense of background blur because you cannot control the aperture. That's where panning starts to come into it. but not for nearly head-on shots like yours.

Some really canny guys actually go full manual! That is great if the light is not changing, but will be a real pain if it is. I often shoot racing boats and kite surfers, so I am frequently panning through downsun toward upsun. Makes manual very tough. I prefer to let the camera take care of "the other part".

What gets me with full manual is that you still have to get correct EV, so you are still simply juggling.

As I said, ND filters are the way to go iof you want slow shutter and wider aperture in bright light.


Nick
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but don't expect me to agree:cool:

  
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FMX
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Mar 07, 2010 22:49 |  #32

Definitely Tv if not Manual for sports. You want control of the shutter speed in sports for sure... Btw those last pics look a lot better. As others have said you would benefit from the fast focusing of the 70-200 and overall quality. It focuses unreal fast.




  
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motofan
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Mar 08, 2010 17:23 |  #33

another good thing is with a good filter on the front, the 70-200 is really weather resistant. I'm not shy about shooting in somewhat dusty and wet conditions. Obviously you want to limit exposure but getting it a little wet or dirty by accident shouldn't harm it. I know i took a header into the mud last year, and after 30 minutes of cleaning the mud out of everywhere, it was like it never happened. I wouldn't trade the 70-200 for anything to be attached to the 40D




  
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Twhit.
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Mar 08, 2010 20:06 as a reply to  @ motofan's post |  #34

Next time out I will use TV mode.I'am not ready for manual mode.


Canon 50D and a bag full of stuff!

  
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Twhit.
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Mar 09, 2010 18:37 as a reply to  @ Twhit.'s post |  #35

If I were to try manual mode with my D50 , what settings would I start with?(for motocross on a clear sunny day)


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OldNick
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Mar 09, 2010 18:57 as a reply to  @ Twhit.'s post |  #36

I honestly cannot see the point. With manual, you have to take care of all the EV conditions. If the light changes at all, you become over or underexposed, unless you change one parameter. This means that you have to pretty well know exactly where the subject is going to be when you take the shot, if they are riding in changing light, such as when you pan with them as you wait for them to do a jump, or turn or whatever.

Regarding what settings you would use, that's part of the call you have to make. You have to choose the shutter speed you want for either freezing a shot or panning, then select the aperture that suits what you think the light will be when you take the shot, so the the EV is close to correct, as indicated by the camera's EV bar/indicator. Or choose an aperture that makes for the DOF that suits you and select a shutter speed that suits the EV.

That is the point I am trying to make. You are still bound by the "rules" (physics) of the fact that each setting requires that the other be within a narrow range to suit the light. You can get away with maybe one stop, and it's better underexposed than over, usually. If you use a semi-auto like Av or Tv, the camera gives you a range to work with as the light changes. You might not get exactly the "other setting" you want, but you get a correctly exposed shot. I used a full manual camera for years when I started out, and for action stuff it had you working if the light was changing. It was not just snap-happy amateurs that gobbled up the auto cameras.

It's up to you of course, but I reckon you have enough to bother with shooting a fast-moving bike.


Nick
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Twhit.
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Mar 09, 2010 20:27 |  #37

OldNick wrote in post #9763338 (external link)
I honestly cannot see the point. With manual, you have to take care of all the EV conditions. If the light changes at all, you become over or underexposed, unless you change one parameter. This means that you have to pretty well know exactly where the subject is going to be when you take the shot, if they are riding in changing light, such as when you pan with them as you wait for them to do a jump, or turn or whatever.

Regarding what settings you would use, that's part of the call you have to make. You have to choose the shutter speed you want for either freezing a shot or panning, then select the aperture that suits what you think the light will be when you take the shot, so the the EV is close to correct, as indicated by the camera's EV bar/indicator. Or choose an aperture that makes for the DOF that suits you and select a shutter speed that suits the E
That is the point I am trying to make. You are still bound by the "rules" (physics) of the fact that each setting requires that the other be within a narrow range to suit the light. You can get away with maybe one stop, and it's better underexposed than over, usually. If you use a semi-auto like Av or Tv, the camera gives you a range to work with as the light changes. You might not get exactly the "other setting" you want, but you get a correctly exposed shot. I used a full manual camera for years when I started out, and for action stuff it had you working if the light was changing. It was not just snap-happy amateurs that gobbled up the auto cameras.

It's up to you of course, but I reckon you have enough to bother with shooting a fast-moving bike.

I think I will stick with AV and TV mde!!!!!!!!!!!!!Thanks for all your input!


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OldNick
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Mar 10, 2010 01:12 as a reply to  @ Twhit.'s post |  #38

Although I said that the camera "takes care" of the other side, you should still be watching what is happening as you move around in the light. Be ready to alter ISO, for instance, if the camera starts to give you too much DOF, or it may actually reach the end of the apertures available for that shutter speed. However semi-auto does give you all this stops of leeway.

When I am setting up at a location, I usually swing across the intended panning field of view, seeing how the camera reacts as I move though the brightness spectrum. That lets me decide the ISO, shutter speed etc, and I work to mostly shoot where I get the best result. For long pans, because most cameras are now limited to 100ISO slowest, I am starting to try ND filters, for slower shutter and larger aperture. sigh.


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Motocross-My first shots?
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