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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 06 Mar 2010 (Saturday) 12:18
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can a lens affect exposure metering?

 
anothernewb
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Mar 06, 2010 12:18 |  #1

can lens affect the camera's meter? or is it more likely that I've just gotten better at watching for the highlights?

I was looking though some pics I took with the 18-55 IS kit lens, and there seemed to be a general tendency to have blown out skies in many of my outdoor shots.

I now have the 15-85 and compared a number of the shots with that lens and in general, the sky and lighter objects seem less prone to being overexposed.

not complaining about the camera or lenses - just more kind of curious if that's a possibilty. I don't think I'm paying any more attention to the exposure than i did before - but then again, maybe it's become habitual. My thinking is that the meter is what it is, and it meters on the light that hits it - lenses should have no effect correct? i mean if light hits the sensor - light hits the sensor.


Gripped 80D,10-18 STM, 55-250 IS STM, 15-85 IS USM, 85 1.8, 10-400 II, 430 EX II

  
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440roadrunner
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Mar 06, 2010 12:51 |  #2
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As a guy who plays with manual lenses, glass (for some reason) DOES AFFECT metering. My old Xt was much better at metering (uncoupled) manual lenses than my 40D, which is usually blown clear past compensation range.

As far as EF glass--there certainly could be a misalignment between lens (electronics) and the camera which would make the exposure stop--down unaccurate. The camera meters wide open, then stops the lens down just before shutter opens. so if something is electrically/ mechanically wrong in the lens that causes it to not stop down the correct amount, certainly it will affect exposure.


2-40D's, 30D, Xt, EOS-3, Elan7, ElanII 100-400L, 24-105L, 17-55IS 2.8, Sig 12-24 EX DG 4.5
Mamiya M645 1000S, 45mm 2.8, 80mm 1.9, 110mm 2.8 + 2x extender

  
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can a lens affect exposure metering?
FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
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