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FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos RAW, Post Processing & Printing 
Thread started 18 May 2010 (Tuesday) 23:23
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How to get good backlighting?

 
Milla
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May 18, 2010 23:23 |  #1

I am in love with JD's photos. She seems especially good at backlighting. Whenever I do backlighting my subject never seems well lit. Here are two good examples of JD's backlighting: http://jamiedelaineblo​g.com …-grace-stevens-portraits/ (external link)
and http://jamiedelaineblo​g.com/post/date/2010/0​3/ (external link)

Is this something that is done in post? If not, how do I get I get my subjects well lit when they are backlit?

Her subjects always have lovely skin tones too. How is this achieved?


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S2K.OGRAPHY
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May 18, 2010 23:25 |  #2

use a flash?


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ssim
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May 19, 2010 02:49 as a reply to  @ S2K.OGRAPHY's post |  #3

You can use a flash or more importantly is to plan your shot out with the subject placement correctly.

You can enhance back lighting to some degree in post processing but you are not going to be able to simulate sunlight to the degree that the natural lighting will give you. If you do use the sun for your back lighting you have to be careful with the harsh shadows and loss of detail in the subject. Proper exposure and using the right amount of forward facing fill flash is almost a must in doing this correctly. Some will try to take the multiple shots and merge them to get the balance that they want.

To answer your overall question of how do you get yours to look well lit. There is nothing like practice and over time it will become easier.


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René ­ Damkot
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May 19, 2010 08:36 |  #4

Milla wrote in post #10206990 (external link)
Is this something that is done in post?

Part of it I think.
For the rest: Try here: http://www.sunbounce.d​e/index.php?id=beispie​le0&L=1 (external link) (Some image on that site are NSFW)


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sdipirro
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May 19, 2010 12:05 as a reply to  @ René Damkot's post |  #5

Looks to me like she's using the sun as her hair light/accent light in all the outdoor shots. You can use your camera's metering system to expose the hair and background to suit your personal tastes. Then you need a flash or, better yet, off camera lighting on the subject to make sure the exposure on the subject is what you want. You use the flash/lighting to properly expose the subject at a given aperture and shutter speed to control the ambient exposure (along with ISO).


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sdipirro
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May 19, 2010 12:08 |  #6

Oh, and depending on the position of the sun and how strong it is, you can sometimes use a reflector to bounce sunlight back on the subject to fill in shadows and properly expose skintones...either in place of flash or in addition to it to add more highlights.


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egordon99
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May 19, 2010 14:23 |  #7

Milla wrote in post #10206990 (external link)
IIf not, how do I get I get my subjects well lit when they are backlit?

Add light to the front? ;)




  
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cdifoto
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May 27, 2010 06:44 |  #8

Looks to me like you just have to be willing to let the sky blow to smithereens. ;) :)


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ImagineTNT
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May 27, 2010 20:36 as a reply to  @ cdifoto's post |  #9

Personally this is how I like to do it: I use the in-camera metering set to spot. This lets me be very precise in metering skin tones off the person's face. If you're doing any sort of overall/evaluative metering you'll have to be EV compensating and all that. To me, it's just easier to meter because I know exactly where it should be. About 1 1/3 past center on my camera (I can detail this more if anyone likes).

Once you have the metering right you can use some fill light (that just balances how "blown out" your sky is). Just remember the more you balance out, the more you reduce the backlighting effect.

You can also shoot all natural light if you don't mind blowing out the sky as cdifoto points out. It looks like most of JD's photos are done natural light. When shooting properly, you can get this effect with no post work.


Here are a few backlighting examples with all natural light:

IMAGE: http://www.celebrationpackages.com/images/portfolio/couples/BrieScott/BrieScott_102909_0149.jpg

IMAGE: http://www.celebrationpackages.com/images/portfolio/couples/BrieScott/BrieScott_102909_0152.jpg

IMAGE: http://www.celebrationpackages.com/images/portfolio/families/jessicar/Jessica_010610_B.jpg

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wernersl
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May 28, 2010 11:08 |  #10

Heres a couple from the weekend. the first one is natural light, second was just a touch of fill flash with the 580. had to really compress to upload these cause i cant get to photobucket from here. you get the idea though


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js09
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May 28, 2010 14:08 |  #11

whoa. intense website/blog/facebook for a natural light shooter.


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How to get good backlighting?
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